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  1. #1 Why are blacks more likely to get and die from Coronavirus? 
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    I have been reading about blacks being more affected by Coronavirus. I have not seen national figures, but according to the Detroit Free Press, "...black people “account for 35% of confirmed cases in the state and 40% of deaths from COVID-19.” According to The Other McCain, "...black people are only 12% of the state’s population." Blacks are,*therefore, overrepresented in the number of Coronavirus cases by a factor of almost 3, state wide.

    Other cities are mentioned in a recent Vox piece:

    As of Tuesday, black people made up 33 percent of cases in Michigan and 40 percent of deaths, despite being just 14 percent of the state’s population. In Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, where blacks represent 26 percent of the population, they made up almost half of the county’s 945 cases and 81 percent of its 27 deaths, according to a ProPublica report. In Illinois, black people made up 42 percent of fatalities but make up only 14.6 percent of the state’s population. In Chicago, the data is even graver: Black people represented 68 percent of the city’s fatalities and more than 50 percent of cases but only make up 30 percent of the city’s total population.

    In the South, the numbers are also grim. In the South, the numbers are also grim. In Louisiana, black people accounted for more than 70 percent of deaths in a state population that is about 33 percent black. About 33 percent of the state’s 512 deaths as of Tuesday morning have occurred in Orleans Parish, where black people make up more than 60 percent of the population and where 29 percent of people live in poverty, according to 2018 census data. Louisiana’s first teen death — also one of the first teen deaths in the nation — was that of 17-year-old New Orleans resident Jaquan Anderson, an aspiring NFL player, according to local reports."]Louisiana[/URL], black people accounted for more than 70 percent of deaths in a state population that is about 33 percent black. About 33 percent of the state’s 512 deaths as of Tuesday morning have occurred in Orleans Parish, where black people make up more than 60 percent of the population and where 29 percent of people live in poverty, according to 2018 census data. Louisiana’s first teen death — also one of the first teen deaths in the nation — was that of 17-year-old New Orleans resident Jaquan Anderson, an aspiring NFL player, according to local reports.
    While I am not a fan of Vox, they have links to all their data here.

    So the question is why. Why are blacks overrepresented in Covid deaths? I can think of a few reasons right off the bat, but I don't know if these explain the excessive numbers we're seeing:

    1. Co-morbidity

    Blacks have a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and other "underlying conditions" that lead to Covid-19 patients to die instead of recover. These underlying conditions seem connected to diet and lifestyle, although heredity may play a role.

    2. High-density living

    Covid-19 in the US is much more widespread in the densely packed cities than in the rural areas. This website, which graphs updates the available public data on Covid 19 shows that the virus is prevalent in big cities but much less so outside of the cities:

    http://webteq360.com/viz/covid-19/?f...bTcw1aJTNIBlNg

    Shows that COVID-19 outbreaks in the U.S. are highly localized.

    New York City’s outbreak crisis shows up in NY, NJ, and CT state data. Urban density (lack of social distance), high levels of international travel, and the recent Lunar New Year celebration in NYC’s Chinatown are drivers of the epidemic in New York City. Problem areas shown by the numbers and visualization in the states of NY, NJ, and CT are driven by the outbreak localized to the vicinity of New York City. Ideally, more detailed data by county, voting districts, and cities will be made available to make better visualizations and analysis.

    The state of Louisiana (LA) is the other problem area, which is localized to New Orleans. The outbreak was fueled by the recent Mardi-Gras celebration on 2-25-2020 with many visitors from China and Europe.
    One can add to this high density living the use of public transportation. Public transportation increases the accidental contact with viruses on seats, metal bars, and in the air from people sneezing, coughing and merely breathing. This is not a black-only issue. In New York and Washington DC, use of the subway/metro is high across racial groups who both live in and commute to the city.

    3. Melanin conspiracy theory

    Early on, the Covid-19 numbers in Africa were low to non-existent. This lead to a theory that blacks were somehow immune from Covid-19 due to the melanin in their skin. This conspiracy theory spread quixkly through the internet to the point where black doctors and even Politifact had to address it:
    https://www.politifact.com/factcheck...t-coronavirus/

    ... coronavirus spreads across the globe, following closely in its path are specious theories with a virality of their own. "People Of Color May Be Immune To The Coronavirus Because Of Melanin" read the headline of one article, from Blackmentravels.com, shared on Facebook. The post was flagged as part of Facebook’s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our partnership with Facebook.) No, dark skin color won’t protect you against coronavirus or the disease it causes, COVID-19.
    4. Deliberately disobeying "shelter in place" orders

    Throughout the crisis, there have been reports of black churches meeting in person, block parties in black neighborhoods, and of course the spring break traveling of college students of all colors. The liberal Pro Publica refers to the issue of blacks ignoring orders to stay at home in this delicate, leftist cant:

    https://www.propublica.org/article/e...-alarming-rate
    ...when the shelter-in-place order came, there was a natural pushback among those who recalled other painful government restrictions — including segregation and mass incarceration — on where black people could walk and gather.


    I think these four reasons explain a lot, and what they argue for is more EDUCATION of the black community, preferably by black doctors who have credibility among blacks. Money, slavery, discrimination, etc. is not the issue here. Education is. I would support more funding for Corona Virus education for blacks. General public health education regarding diet is also important to reduce the co-morbidities that will kill more blacks than whites. When blacks protest a Trader Joe's that will bring in healthy food, but continue to consume fast food at higher rates than any other race, they contribute to the co-morbidity that will kill them in a pandemic.
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member cadillac shark's Avatar
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    The virus prevents oxygen from reaching red bloodcells, so the clue is probably there. In that process.
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  3. #3  
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    You missed one: Ease of getting medical treatment. Now anyone can poo-poo that but hospitals are not being built in predominately black areas. Urgent care units are in the "better" part of town. Why these neighborhoods exist can be debated until the cows come home but that they do is readily apparent.
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    Senior Ape Articulate_Ape's Avatar
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    Interesting points, but I suspect that poverty plays a part in this. Poor people, regardless of race, are less inclined to rush to the emergency room when perhaps they should. This delay in care might account for higher morbidity as well.
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    Senior Member enslaved1's Avatar
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    Number 4 is likely a major effect. There's a culture, not limited to African Americans, nor exclusively African American, that touts various excuses to not follow laws. Sometimes they start with specific ones (weed use comes to mind), but the idea often expands to ignoring whatever rules or laws inconvenience a person or group.

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    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    Another point came to light this morning. Those people living in the shadows of manufacturing and other ‘polluting’ properties have an over abundance of breathing problems which can heighten the effects of the virus. At least downwind of the Texas refining facilities those folks are predominantly black and brown.

    A new study on this is now out for peer review and as yet unpublished.
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    The major hospitals in the Bridgeport Ct. area are all in Bridgeport.

    They are relatively easy to find, especially for the gunshot victims who are dropped off by an unidentified car.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    I

    1. Co-morbidity

    Blacks have a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and other "underlying conditions" that lead to Covid-19 patients to die instead of recover. These underlying conditions seem connected to diet and lifestyle, although heredity may play a role.
    Dr. Fauci mentioned this today at the Press Briefing.
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Banacek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Articulate_Ape View Post
    Interesting points, but I suspect that poverty plays a part in this. Poor people, regardless of race, are less inclined to rush to the emergency room when perhaps they should. This delay in care might account for higher morbidity as well.
    Incorrect.

    They are the first ones to go to emergency rooms because they have no cost medical care.

    In another life I worked in a welfare office.

    It was flu season and (at least in Bridgeport) stations were set up all around town to provide flu shots for parents and their children at no cost. They were to stay open from 8:00 A.M. To 5:00 P.M.

    The first mistake was to open them at 8:00 A.M. The second mistake was to set them up on the same day welfare checks were in the mail.


    All closed by 1:00 P.M. for lack of interest.


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  10. #10  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Articulate_Ape View Post
    Interesting points, but I suspect that poverty plays a part in this. Poor people, regardless of race, are less inclined to rush to the emergency room when perhaps they should. This delay in care might account for higher morbidity as well.
    One of the local (Harris county) health officials agrees with you quite strongly. His statement included the phrase “because you’re poor” as the main reason. He went on to say the co-morbidity thing was a result of the same condition. No money to stabilize treatment therefore continuing to suffer from whatever ails you a little more each day.
    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    . If you ain't havin' fun, it's your own damn fault
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