Thread: DU photographer convicted of failing to show sufficient respect to police...

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  1. #21  
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    Quote Originally Posted by biccat View Post
    In my Criminal Procedures class at law school, after we reviewed a case and topic, we would watch an episode of COPS to see exactly how it is not supposed to be done.

    However, although there are a lot of cops who are jerks, there are a lot that are just trying to do their job and don't like it when some "photojournalist" starts shouting about free speech and his rights, especially when the cop knows he is acting appropriately. The cops have one line in this story, the DUmmie has another. The truth lies somewhere in the middle, and I would wager that the police officer was not singling out this guy.

    Besides, community service and probation isn't a harsh sentence. Don't DUmmies always brag about how they love to help the community? 100 hours should be easy!
    Agreed that the truth probably lies someplace in the middle. However, I think the most probable scenario is that this guy started shooting photos, the cops told him to take a hike, he refused claiming "freedom of the press," and they arrested him. While cops are all for filming suspects in all locations, often times in violation of their civil rights, they really, really don't like people filming or photographing them unless it's guaranteed to be good publicity like Cops.

    As to it being a harsh sentence, counselor, it's a misdemeanour! Employers now not only ask if you've been convicted of a felony, they include misdemeanours as well. I know that in my line of work, dealing with large financial institutions, even a misdemeanour is a "death sentence."
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  2. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Warrior View Post
    As to it being a harsh sentence, counselor, it's a misdemeanour! Employers now not only ask if you've been convicted of a felony, they include misdemeanours as well. I know that in my line of work, dealing with large financial institutions, even a misdemeanour is a "death sentence."
    He was going to be found guilty of a misdemeanor anyway, he was complaining (either in the thread or on his blog, can't remember which) that the sentence was too harsh. Whether it was 100 hours of community service and a year of probation, or 12 hours and a month, it is still a misdemeanor.

    The prosecutor probably gave him a chance to plea out to a lesser charge that wasn't a misdemeanor, but he decided to take a chance with a trial, and worse, a jury.
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  3. #23  
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    Whether at a crime scene or a traffic stop, the police want complete control. If you do not understand that, you are not too bright. I have been stopped many times for speeding and have talked my way out of most tickets by showing respect. I think for the most part that the cops do a great job and have a job that I sure as hell would not want. Sure there are some bad apples but if you want to be an asshole, go ahead and shoot your mouth off if it makes you feel better. Just be prepared to suffer the consequences.
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  4. #24  
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    Quote Originally Posted by lacarnut View Post
    Whether at a crime scene or a traffic stop, the police want complete control. If you do not understand that, you are not too bright. I have been stopped many times for speeding and have talked my way out of most tickets by showing respect. I think for the most part that the cops do a great job and have a job that I sure as hell would not want. Sure there are some bad apples but if you want to be an asshole, go ahead and shoot your mouth off if it makes you feel better. Just be prepared to suffer the consequences.
    In a past life, I worked in hospitial security while attending college. I came to understand some of the crap that cops have to endure in their usually thankless jobs. Yes, there are some bad ones on power trips and others that are outright crooked. However, most are good and deserve our general respect until they demonstrate otherwise.
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  5. #25  
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    S.O.P. in my town when getting stopped at night is:

    1./ Roll your window down.
    2./ Put BOTH of your hands on the dash.

    I learned this when a guy I went to high school told me when he makes a stop at night he walks up on the car with his flash light in one hand, his mic open, and a baby Glock 26 strapped to the back of his metal clip board.

    Yes Sir.
    At Coretta Scott King's funeral in early 2006, Ethel Kennedy, the widow of Robert Kennedy, leaned over to him and whispered, "The torch is being passed to you." "A chill went up my spine," Obama told an aide. (Newsweek)
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  6. #26  
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    Quote Originally Posted by lacarnut View Post
    Whether at a crime scene or a traffic stop, the police want complete control. If you do not understand that, you are not too bright. I have been stopped many times for speeding and have talked my way out of most tickets by showing respect. I think for the most part that the cops do a great job and have a job that I sure as hell would not want. Sure there are some bad apples but if you want to be an asshole, go ahead and shoot your mouth off if it makes you feel better. Just be prepared to suffer the consequences.
    Keep in mind that, unlike a civilian, the police officer has a radio and is in touch with others in the area, so he has a better situational awareness than the crowd that he is trying to control. He will have information that a blogger with a camera won't have, and if he's been told to clear an area or get it under control quickly because something is going on a block or two away, then he's got to do that, and anyone who impedes him without knowing all of the facts may be endangering themself or others. An idiot who starts talking about his personal "right" to observe and record the police while they do their jobs, instead of backing off, is interfering with law enforcement.

    And, if you are polite and respectful and the cop still treats you badly, document it and file a complaint. When a civilian complaint review board reviews the complaint, they will investigate the officer's conduct and yours, and if you did what you were told to do, and didn't make a scene, and were still spoken to in an abusive or disrespectful manner, or worse, they will come down on the officer.
    --Odysseus
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  7. #27  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Keep in mind that, unlike a civilian, the police officer has a radio and is in touch with others in the area, so he has a better situational awareness than the crowd that he is trying to control. He will have information that a blogger with a camera won't have, and if he's been told to clear an area or get it under control quickly because something is going on a block or two away, then he's got to do that, and anyone who impedes him without knowing all of the facts may be endangering themself or others. An idiot who starts talking about his personal "right" to observe and record the police while they do their jobs, instead of backing off, is interfering with law enforcement.

    And, if you are polite and respectful and the cop still treats you badly, document it and file a complaint. When a civilian complaint review board reviews the complaint, they will investigate the officer's conduct and yours, and if you did what you were told to do, and didn't make a scene, and were still spoken to in an abusive or disrespectful manner, or worse, they will come down on the officer.
    That's usually true in larger cities and urban areas. Those departments are larger enough to have internal politics that make the officers have to watch their P&Q's. In the small towns, they all tend to cover for one another too closely. Even the good ones have trouble getting bad ones reprimanded. It's better to make your complaints to the state police even though they will initially try to get you to make your complaint at a more local level.
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  8. #28  
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLibertarian View Post
    That's usually true in larger cities and urban areas. Those departments are larger enough to have internal politics that make the officers have to watch their P&Q's. In the small towns, they all tend to cover for one another too closely. Even the good ones have trouble getting bad ones reprimanded. It's better to make your complaints to the state police even though they will initially try to get you to make your complaint at a more local level.
    This is true. Funny thing is, since moving to Texas, I've gotten two speeding tickets, but the police (both locals) couldn't have been nicer. Made it almost worth the fine for their company.
    --Odysseus
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