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  1. #1 "Google Wants Your Hard Drives On Their Network !" 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Google plans to make PCs history

    "More "BIG BROTHER' From Obama's State Security Organ ."


    "These people are seriously into spying on America for Obama .They have about as much 'Finesse' as an alligator."

    Google is to launch a service that would enable users to access their personal computer from any internet connection, according to industry reports. But campaigners warn that it would give the online behemoth unprecedented control over individuals' personal data.

    The Google Drive, or "GDrive", could kill off the desktop computer, which relies on a powerful hard drive. Instead a user's personal files and operating system could be stored on Google's own servers and accessed via the internet.

    The long-rumoured GDrive is expected to be launched this year, according to the technology news website TG Daily, which described it as "the most anticipated Google product so far". It is seen as a paradigm shift away from Microsoft's Windows operating system, which runs inside most of the world's computers, in favour of "cloud computing", where the processing and storage is done thousands of miles away in remote data centres.

    Home and business users are increasingly turning to web-based services, usually free, ranging from email (such as Hotmail and Gmail) and digital photo storage (such as Flickr and Picasa) to more applications for documents and spreadsheets (such as Google Apps). The loss of a laptop or crash of a hard drive does not jeopardise the data because it is regularly saved in "the cloud" and can be accessed via the web from any machine.

    The GDrive would follow this logic to its conclusion by shifting the contents of a user's hard drive to the Google servers. The PC would be a simpler, cheaper device acting as a portal to the web, perhaps via an adaptation of Google's operating system for mobile phones, Android. Users would think of their computer as software rather than hardware.

    "They already have these .They are called 'internet appliances',pc's minus a hard drive !"

    It is this prospect that alarms critics of Google's ambitions. Peter Brown, executive director of the Free Software Foundation, a charity defending computer users' liberties, did not dispute the convenience offered, but said: "It's a little bit like saying, 'we're in a dictatorship, the trains are running on time.' But does it matter to you that someone can see everything on your computer? Does it matter that Google can be subpoenaed at any time to hand over all your data to the American government?"

    Google refused to confirm the GDrive, but acknowledged the growing demand for cloud computing. Dave Armstrong, head of product and marketing for Google Enterprise, said: "There's a clear direction ... away from people thinking, 'This is my PC, this is my hard drive,' to 'This is how I interact with information, this is how I interact with the web.'"


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology...drive-internet
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  2. #2  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    The concept is - if they do everything web based - then pirated software can be eliminated. They've been talking about this shift for years . . .
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    The concept is - if they do everything web based - then pirated software can be eliminated. They've been talking about this shift for years . . .
    It goes far beyond that .They could care less about piracy,they are interested in what you are spreading about on the web and who is helping you do it.They know that as the changes are made to the law and the constitution that people will rebel and they need to identify the ringleaders and round them up quick .They will start with Limbaugh and Hennity and then go after Free republic and StopObama.com shutting them down for some blown up reason.Google is key to their plans for gathering anti Obama data on the net .
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    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    someone needs a new tinfoil hat . . . .
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    someone needs a new tinfoil hat . . . .
    Time will tell. You must admit though that boogiemen aside, unintended consequences could lead to exactly what the article suggests. I'm for fighting this possibility every step.
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    The concept is - if they do everything web based - then pirated software can be eliminated. They've been talking about this shift for years . . .
    In the tech industry, we've been anticipating this for a long time, at least from a storage perspective. We've imagined the benefits of all personal media being keep in a central storage system that could be accessed any where. Data files and the software to run them could be downloaded on to small computers and executed locally. The transmission speeds aren't there yet but very soon this will be a possiblity. If the privacy issues can be worked out this could be a great thing for reducing the cost, size and weight of computers while increasing the size and decreasing the cost of data storage.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
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  7. #7  
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    Tinfoil or not, the potential for abuse is huge. To think otherwise is unrealistic. It's centralized information folks! Take all the arguments against registration of all firearms and multiply by a thousand for starters...
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rd-try View Post
    Tinfoil or not, the potential for abuse is huge. To think otherwise is unrealistic. It's centralized information folks! Take all the arguments against registration of all firearms and multiply by a thousand for starters...
    The potential abuse in just about every piece of technology is huge. Should be abandon every piece of new technology because it has the potential to be abused?

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlaGator View Post
    The potential abuse in just about every piece of technology is huge. Should be abandon every piece of new technology because it has the potential to be abused?
    Thats a bit too general, don't you think?
    Is transferring ALL our computer information to a central data bank necessary for the internet's survival? What happens if we continue as is, Does the 'net explode?
    You can't deny the potential for abuse. Accessing such a goldmine of business, and otherwise personal information will become a priority in several circles, legal and otherwise. And the gain that makes it risk worth taking is exactly what?
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  10. #10  
    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rd-try View Post
    Thats a bit too general, don't you think?
    Is transferring ALL our computer information to a central data bank necessary for the internet's survival? What happens if we continue as is, Does the 'net explode?
    You can't deny the potential for abuse. Accessing such a goldmine of business, and otherwise personal information will become a priority in several circles, legal and otherwise. And the gain that makes it risk worth taking is exactly what?
    Some of the privacy issues can be resolved with encryption, but the government does keep a heavy hand in the encryption game. Any encryption (with the exception of quantum encryption) can be broken given a strong enough desire to break it. Most stuff that you will keep on line won't be so valuable as to cause someone to expend the effort to hack it. To be honest, it will be more secure that an alarm system on your home. Such systems only discourage robbers and thieves and any determined thief will circumvent you locks and security system. In the end, it will be a lot harder and more costly for someone to crack encryption on network storage than it would be for a burglar to bypass your system.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
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