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  1. #1 Weird Names Linked to Criminal Activity. 
    Odd first names linked to criminality

    Jennifer Harper (Contact)
    Thursday, January 29, 2009

    Mama, stick with Michael. But Malcolm? Maybe not.

    A man's first name can predict his criminal tendencies, according to research released Wednesday by economists who compared crime statistics and a roster of more than 15,000 first names to reveal a distinct "name-crime link" among American males.

    The more unpopular or uncommon the name, the greater the chance the lad will end up in jail, said David E. Kalist and Daniel Y. Lee of Shippensburg University.

    "Regardless of race, juveniles with unpopular names are more likely to engage in criminal activity," the study said.

    It applied succinct values to the names - Michael, for example, was rated at 100, and the least likely name to be associated with juvenile delinquency. David was in the middle at 50, with Alec, Ernest, Ivan, Malcolm and Tyrell languishing with a 1-point rating.

    The researchers found that for every 10 percent increase in a name's popularity, there was a 4 percent decrease in the number of juvenile delinquents of the same name.

    (snip)

    Social and cultural factors come into play, said Mr. Kalist, whose study was published in Social Science Quarterly, an academic journal.

    "While the names are likely not the cause of crime, they are connected to factors that increase the tendency to commit crime, such as a disadvantaged home environment, residence in a county with low socioeconomic status, and households run by one parent," he said.

    Yet, weird names also are common among our most well-heeled citizens. Celebrities are often notorious for bestowing odd monikers on their offspring. In recent years, magician Penn Jillette named his sons Moxie Crimefighter and Zolten, for example, while singer Gwen Stefani called her second baby boy Zuma Nesta Rock.
    I think they turn to crime out frustration with the fact that no one can satisfactorily pronounce "KeShaligua".

    Washington Times
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    About 15 years ago, when I was a delinquency worker, most of the white boys on my case load were named Jason and Steven. There were plenty of Michaels, but that name transcends race, for some reason.

    There were lots of Heathers among the white girls.

    I will say this about "black" names-at least the kid is usually the only one with that name, spelled that way, in his or her class. There were about 15 Sues in my graduating class (1982), and just as many Lisas. Michelle and Karen were also very common.
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    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
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    New of the Weird has a section on all the criminals with the middle name of Wayne. After years of reporting about the weirdness in the world they noticed that all lot of suspects and perps had Wayne for a middle name.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
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  4. #4  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    I think people should have the right to name their kids what ever they want. I also think I should be allowed to slap any parent who has named their kid something STUPID. I think the correlation between weird names and crime is more a comment on the character of people who name their kids weird shit.
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    About 15 years ago, when I was a delinquency worker, most of the white boys on my case load were named Jason and Steven. There were plenty of Michaels, but that name transcends race, for some reason.

    There were lots of Heathers among the white girls.

    I will say this about "black" names-at least the kid is usually the only one with that name, spelled that way, in his or her class. There were about 15 Sues in my graduating class (1982), and just as many Lisas. Michelle and Karen were also very common.
    I think the love affair with unique names is kind of overrated. It's not helpful if your highly unique name is consistently mispronounced and misspelled. My last name is very unusual and it gets tiresome correcting people all the time.

    I don't see anything wrong with wrong with having the same name as some famous historical person. I have one of those "interesting" first names that doesn't relate to anything. It kind of sucks. My name doesn't mean anything (real or imagined), it has no history, it can't be either reduced to a nick name or expanded to a sensible given name, and it's gender neutral (or confusing).

    It is easy to spell, though, so that's something. :p
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    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I think the love affair with unique names is kind of overrated. It's not helpful if your highly unique name is consistently mispronounced and misspelled. My last name is very unusual and it gets tiresome correcting people all the time.

    I don't see anything wrong with wrong with having the same name as some famous historical person. I have one of those "interesting" first names that doesn't relate to anything. It kind of sucks. My name doesn't mean anything (real or imagined), it has no history, it can't be either reduced to a nick name or expanded to a sensible given name, and it's gender neutral (or confusing).

    It is easy to spell, though, so that's something. :p
    oh just be glad you don't have a roman numeral after your name. :mad: People were surprised that I didn't torture my son with a numeral - dumbasses.
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    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    oh just be glad you don't have a roman numeral after your name. :mad: People were surprised that I didn't torture my son with a numeral - dumbasses.
    I always wanted to name a child Thurston Howell III.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
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  8. #8 Boys with unusual names 'more likely to commit crime' 
    Super Moderator bijou's Avatar
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    That would appear to be the advice from researchers who claim the more unusual a boy’s name is, the greater the likelihood he will commit crimes in adolescence.

    A study conducted by economists at the Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania set out to explore “the relationship between first name popularity and juvenile delinquency”.

    David E. Kalist and Daniel Y. Lee compared the first names of juvenile offenders in one US state with the first names of young males in the general population of that state.

    They assigned a popularity-name index (PNI) for each name based on how common it is among the general population and how unlikely it is to be associated with criminal behaviour. Therefore for Michael, the PNI is 100 while for David, it is 50.

    For names such as Alec, Ernest, Ivan, Kareem, and Malcolm, however, the PNI came out around one.

    When they considered young offenders, the researchers discovered a different distribution of names to that of the general population.

    The study found that, regardless of race, juveniles with the least popular names were more likely to engage in criminal activity. ...
    link

    Not terribly surprising for those of us who peruse the weird crime reports. ;)
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    Senior Member Rebel Yell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I think the love affair with unique names is kind of overrated. It's not helpful if your highly unique name is consistently mispronounced and misspelled. My last name is very unusual and it gets tiresome correcting people all the time.

    I don't see anything wrong with wrong with having the same name as some famous historical person. I have one of those "interesting" first names that doesn't relate to anything. It kind of sucks. My name doesn't mean anything (real or imagined), it has no history, it can't be either reduced to a nick name or expanded to a sensible given name, and it's gender neutral (or confusing).

    It is easy to spell, though, so that's something. :p
    I thought you're first name was the same as a spice? It was that last name of Snap always got me.
    I feel that once a black fella has referred to white foks as "honky paleface devil white-trash cracker redneck Caspers," he's abdicated the right to get upset about the "N" word. But that's just me. -- Jim Goad
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  10. #10  
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    Parents, stop giving your kids crappy names.
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