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  1. #1 Auschwitz survivor dies at 100 in fire at home in Brooklyn 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Auschwitz survivor dies at 100 in fire at home in Brooklyn

    Photo:Pallbearers carry coffin bearing the body of David Weiss, a 100-year old Brooklyn man who died in a fire in his Williamsburg home, during his funeral Sunday at the Satmar shul on Bedford St.


    David Weiss went to synagogue every day, including Saturday, the day he died, relatives said.A Brooklyn man who survived both world wars, the Auschwitz gas chambers and the deaths of four wives perished at age 100 when he was trapped in a fire in his Williamsburg home.

    David Weiss had seen the worst of the world but remained deeply faithful. He went to synagogue every day, including the morning he died, when relatives said he returned home for a forgotten prayer shawl and was caught in the flames."He lived for God," said his granddaughter, Faigy Stroh. "A very humble man."Neighbors called Weiss a lively man who seemed younger than his years.
    ........................ "Hear, O Israel: Y'hovah Elohiym one Y'hovah."

    "A 100-year-old man and he still walked without a cane - he still walked on his two feet. To be killed in a fire? It is a tragedy," said Moses Bineth, 31, who works at the minimart where Weiss bought chocolate for his great-grandkids.

    When firefighters arrived at 144 Division Ave. at 9:04 a.m. Saturday, flames had engulfed a row of buildings between Bedford Ave. and Clymer St. near the Williamsburg Bridge. They were mostly small businesses with apartments on the second floor.The fire was so intense it was deemed unsafe for firefighters to enter the buildings, officials said. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

    Even after the flames were doused from the outside just after noon, the structures remained so shaky that rescuers could not go inside until after midnight.Weiss' body was found under the dining table, relatives said. He was not burned and apparently died of smoke inhalation.

    Relatives said about 14 people, including Weiss' daughter, Sarah, and several grandchildren, were celebrating the Sabbath at the apartment. All but Weiss escaped unhurt.Born in Romania, Weiss was in his early 30s when he was sent to the Nazi concentration camp where his pregnant first wife, Rivkah, and three children were killed.

    Yanky Weiss said his grandfather was minutes away from being forced into the death chamber himself."He was in line to be burnt," the grandson said. "For some reason, two soldiers pulled him out of the line. He had no idea why. Our theory was that he was a strong-looking man and they could use him for work."

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2009...in_fire_a.html
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  2. #2  
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    Thank you for that story.

    Mr. Weiss, rest in peace.
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  3. #3  
    How awful. I feel glad that I am old enough to have known a Holocaust survivor. He was a natty sort of man who owned a deli/general store. I can remember asking my Grandmother why he had numbers on his wrist.

    She sat me down and explained in no uncertain terms exactly why he had those numbers, what they meant, who he was in the bigger ethnic/religious world, and why I had an obligation as a Christian to respect religious Jews.

    It's lesson I never forgot.
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  4. #4  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    How awful. I feel glad that I am old enough to have known a Holocaust survivor. He was a natty sort of man who owned a deli/general store. I can remember asking my Grandmother why he had numbers on his wrist.

    She sat me down and explained in no uncertain terms exactly why he had those numbers, what they meant, who he was in the bigger ethnic/religious world, and why I had an obligation as a Christian to respect religious Jews.

    It's lesson I never forgot.
    I think all true Christians have the same obligation, after all we have the one true GOD between us .
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    I think all true Christians have the same obligation, after all we have the one true GOD between us .
    And they have the Convent of the Chosen People. While I'm glad we have our own, I'm pretty much okay with being able to flip on a light switch on Sunday. :)
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    And they have the Convent of the Chosen People. While I'm glad we have our own, I'm pretty much okay with being able to flip on a light switch on Sunday. :)
    When I was a kid I earned my weekend movie money by lighting the gas stove burners for a Polish Hasidism Jewish woman so she could cook her Sabbath meals !
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    How awful. I feel glad that I am old enough to have known a Holocaust survivor. He was a natty sort of man who owned a deli/general store. I can remember asking my Grandmother why he had numbers on his wrist.

    She sat me down and explained in no uncertain terms exactly why he had those numbers, what they meant, who he was in the bigger ethnic/religious world, and why I had an obligation as a Christian to respect religious Jews.

    It's lesson I never forgot.

    There are still quite a few survivors in the northern Detroit suburbs, who have the numbers burned on their arms. There's a Holocaust museum in Bloomfield Hills, or somewhere in that area.

    I read "The Diary of Anne Frank" when I was in 3rd grade, and had to ask my mom a lot of questions. The diary part is about the family hiding out, but the afterword, which discusses the fate of Anne and her family, is the horrible part. I read my first real survivor's account a few years later, when I read "The Hiding Place".
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