Thread: Alaska 10,200-foot Mount Redoubt Volcano on Verge of Venting

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  1. #1 Alaska 10,200-foot Mount Redoubt Volcano on Verge of Venting 
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    Alaska Volcano on Verge of Venting

    Brent Hibbert will replace the air filters in his 18 taxicabs every 50 to 100 miles if the volcano at Alaska's Mount Redoubt erupts and coats his hometown of Kenai with engine-choking ash."It gets into everything," Hibbert said.He and other residents are preparing for what geologists say could be imminent. Steam and tremors emanating from the 10,200-foot Redoubt Volcano, located about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, are more likely than not to result in an eruption.

    If that happens, the abrasive ash could blanket the state's most populous area and threaten commercial air traffic in the region, said geologist Tina Neal of the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory.
    The Redoubt Volcano produces thick, grayish lava that rises in a dome. The ash can spew up to40,000 feet, observatory volcanologist Dave Schneider said.

    "This is rock fragments, mineral fragments and glass," Schneider said. "It has the density of rock, not fluffy ash like when you burn wood."For the past few weeks, the gurgling mountain has prompted residents to make a run on dust masks and health officials to warn the old, young and people with respiratory problems to stay indoors if the volcano blows.

    George Sides, 52, a sales clerk at Andy's Ace Hardware and Radio Shack in Anchorage, said his store received a new shipment of dust masks after running out this week.Shoppers also were buying safety goggles and emergency radios, said Sides, who was in Anchorage in 1992 when another volcano, Mount Spurr, erupted."It was just dirty," Sides said. "We had to sweep our roof. We had to wear dust masks for days."

    Sgt. Robb Quelland of the Soldotna Police Department, said public safety officials are prepared to be extra busy if Mount Redoubt erupts, especially if the wind continues to blow in the direction of his town of 4,000 residents.

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    Senior Member ironhorsedriver's Avatar
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    Is that the same as, say, Mt. St. Helens? Does it have that potential? Or do they anticipate heavy ash and perhaps a pyroclastic flow, but remain fairly intact?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironhorsedriver View Post
    Is that the same as, say, Mt. St. Helens? Does it have that potential? Or do they anticipate heavy ash and perhaps a pyroclastic flow, but remain fairly intact?
    This thing has been "Orange" for a couple of weeks now. It's not expected to have a catastrophic eruption, but the ash plume it puts out is expected to blanket Anchorage and the surrounding area.
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    Senior Member ironhorsedriver's Avatar
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    i guess the Ash can be pretty devastating in it's own right. I wonder if roofs in Alaska are strengthened for the sheer weight of the ash? Probably more so than Montserrat and the Philippines, since they deal with snow and ice.
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    Zoomie djones520's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironhorsedriver View Post
    i guess the Ash can be pretty devastating in it's own right. I wonder if roofs in Alaska are strengthened for the sheer weight of the ash? Probably more so than Montserrat and the Philippines, since they deal with snow and ice.
    Yeah, ash shouldn't have to much of an effect on the structural integrity of buildings there. It's gonna bring all air traffic to a halt, and i'm sure most business will slow for a while as well since it'll be a pretty big health hazard to be out in that stuff.
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    Senior Member Moon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironhorsedriver View Post
    i guess the Ash can be pretty devastating in it's own right. I wonder if roofs in Alaska are strengthened for the sheer weight of the ash? Probably more so than Montserrat and the Philippines, since they deal with snow and ice.
    The Philippines would have fared much better if there hadn't been a typhoon right in the middle of one of the biggest eruptions of Pinatubo. When the ash gets mixed with water, it gets pretty dense.
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