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  1. #1 Celebutards Get Wake-Up Call. 
    Haggling with the Stars
    by Kim Masters


    You’re Scarlett Johansson. You’re pretty and you’re pretty famous, too. And you’ve just been offered the part of the Black Widow in Iron Man 2! That’s got to be some payday, right?

    How about $250,000, which is what Marvel Studios offered Johansson and Mickey Rourke to be in the film?

    The stars negotiated the number up to something over $400,000. Still, it’s not hard to imagine that even a year ago Johansson could have expected to break seven figures for a role in a big franchise film. It’s a pretty thrifty deal for such a recognizable name.

    But salaries are being slashed now in Hollywood and even bigger stars are not immune. “Why would anybody pay Julia Roberts $20 million to do Duplicity?” says one producer. “That won’t happen again.” Indeed, this source says Sony Pictures is ponying up $15 million for Roberts to do Eat, Pray, Love and probably already regrets having committed to pay that much.

    What the revolution in technology had started, the economy has hurried right along. After years of impotent promises to choke off rich deals with talent, the studios are finally making it happen. They’re hammering on star salaries and perks like private jets, too. “They’ve wanted to go in this direction for a long time and the global financial crisis has given them the lever to do it,” says one veteran talent representative.

    These changes may cheer up ordinary citizens who can’t understand why a star ever got millions to be in a movie in the first place. But the fact that the studios are finally laying down the law also illustrates the strains they are under as they try to crank out expensive popular entertainment when the model is collapsing. Stars in the middle range—famous names but something well short of, say, Will Smith--are facing the toughest battles. “The studios are going out to actors who have been $10 million players and saying, `Here’s $5 million.’ Here’s two and a half,” says a top agent. “It’s like there are no rules.” If an actor balks at the deal, the studios say they will move to another choice immediately. “They’re not fucking around,” says the talent representative. “They know exactly who that next person is. Sometimes they’ll tell you.”

    That clearly seems to have been the case with Johansson and Rourke, says an agent who doesn’t represent either actor. “On certain movies, they feel like whoever they put in a part is fine. Once they lock down Robert Downey, Jr., on Iron Man 2, everything else is fine. I don’t think they give a shit if it’s Mickey Rourke or Scarlett Johansson.”
    *snort*

    The Daily Beast
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  2. #2  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    i'm sure that their contracts have profit sharing clauses. Don't get to excited thinking that they will be hurting . . . . unless the movie bombs . . . .
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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    Senior Member enslaved1's Avatar
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    These changes may cheer up ordinary citizens who can’t understand why a star ever got millions to be in a movie in the first place. But the fact that the studios are finally laying down the law also illustrates the strains they are under as they try to crank out expensive popular entertainment when the model is collapsing. Stars in the middle range—famous names but something well short of, say, Will Smith--are facing the toughest battles. “The studios are going out to actors who have been $10 million players and saying, `Here’s $5 million.’ Here’s two and a half,” says a top agent. “It’s like there are no rules.” If an actor balks at the deal, the studios say they will move to another choice immediately. “They’re not fucking around,” says the talent representative. “They know exactly who that next person is. Sometimes they’ll tell you.”
    I understand why they get the salaries they do, and this piece still cheers me up. Kind of like I'm not real sympathetic hearing the SPEEA union folks griping because their new contract "only" has a 13% increase every year. I can't imagine saying no to $2.5 million dollars for six months of work.
    Romans 6:18 You have been set free from sin and have become slaves to righteousness.

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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by enslaved1 View Post
    I understand why they get the salaries they do, and this piece still cheers me up. Kind of like I'm not real sympathetic hearing the SPEEA union folks griping because their new contract "only" has a 13% increase every year. I can't imagine saying no to $2.5 million dollars for six months of work.


    I don't know, I think 2.5 million just isn't enough.


    I make $50,000 a year. That kind of money is inconceivable to me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I make $50,000 a year. That kind of money is inconceivable to me.
    Maybe there aren't as many people who want to watch you do your job. :p
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Maybe there aren't as many people who want to watch you do your job. :p
    I'd watch, but then she'd prolly call me in to help with the paperwork... Social work can be pretty interesting/compelling, but the miles of paperwork and overwork can be hell. Then again, I know this hot social worker in UT. . .

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    I missed the part about "this will also reduce ticket prices by half so that our citizens will still be able to attend movies during this economic crisis".

    This is very old hat anyway. Hitchcock said it many years ago..."actors are like cattle". Too bad the rest of the industry didn't buy into it. Until now apparently.

    I've argued this before too and you'd be suprised about actors that were in huge films that were maybe the third or fourth choice.

    You think the Godfather series would have been any different if DeNiro played Michael and Pacino played young Vito? I don't.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I missed the part about "this will also reduce ticket prices by half so that our citizens will still be able to attend movies during this economic crisis".

    This is very old hat anyway. Hitchcock said it many years ago..."actors are like cattle". Too bad the rest of the industry didn't buy into it. Until now apparently.

    I've argued this before too and you'd be suprised about actors that were in huge films that were maybe the third or fourth choice.

    You think the Godfather series would have been any different if DeNiro played Michael and Pacino played young Vito? I don't.
    I know Will Smith made his bones off of Tom Cruises rejects. (Independence Day, Enemy of the State)

    Tom Cruise was not the first choice for Interview with the Vampire. (Can you picture Rutger Hauer as Lestat? I can... and...well, I like it :D)

    Christian Bale nearly became Robin in the Shumacher series, but lost out to Chris O' Donnell (Yeah, I KNOW!!!)

    And Bale had to fight for his role in American Psycho, wresting it from Leo DiCaprio.

    Actors are interchangeable up to a certain point in their careers. After that, they bring a style or a dedication that can't be replicated.

    ~QC
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  9. #9  
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    Actors are interchangeable up to a certain point in their careers. After that, they bring a style or a dedication that can't be replicated.
    Watching Madogga go to Malawi to buy a baby is even more sickening.

    "She or he will only be allowed Kabbalah water"...whatever the FUCK that is. Overpaid, overstuffed egos.
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by CueSi View Post
    I know Will Smith made his bones off of Tom Cruises rejects. (Independence Day, Enemy of the State)

    Tom Cruise was not the first choice for Interview with the Vampire. (Can you picture Rutger Hauer as Lestat? I can... and...well, I like it :D)

    Christian Bale nearly became Robin in the Shumacher series, but lost out to Chris O' Donnell (Yeah, I KNOW!!!)

    And Bale had to fight for his role in American Psycho, wresting it from Leo DiCaprio.

    Actors are interchangeable up to a certain point in their careers. After that, they bring a style or a dedication that can't be replicated.

    ~QC

    Anne Rice really wanted Rutger Hauer as Lestat, but it ultimately wasn't her call. She at first decried very publicly the casting of Tom Cruise as her french, bisexual vampire and Cruise had ensured that all references to the character's bisexuality were removed from the script. After she saw the movie, she ran an ad in several magazines, including The Advocate, and stated that she liked Cruise in the part. I don't know where she stands on any of that any more, since she has returned to being a devout catholic and has made statements expressing some regrets about some of her previous writing. My only objection to her writing is that she had a tendency to sexualize child characters, and imply even that sexual abuse is okay as long as the perp is charming, handsome and gentle about it (Uncle Julien in The Witching Hour, yet that book is still one of my favorites).

    Val Kilmer walked around LA in character for weeks in order to get the role as Jim Morrison in The Doors.

    I can't imagine DiCaprio as Patrick Bateman. I liked the movie of American Psycho more than the book, because of the twist at the end that made it Bateman's fantasy, and not a reality.
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