Thread: Deep Solar Minimum

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  1. #1 Deep Solar Minimum 
    Deep Solar Minimum
    04.01.2009


    April 1, 2009: The sunspot cycle is behaving a little like the stock market. Just when you think it has hit bottom, it goes even lower.

    2008 was a bear. There were no sunspots observed on 266 of the year's 366 days (73%). To find a year with more blank suns, you have to go all the way back to 1913, which had 311 spotless days: plot. Prompted by these numbers, some observers suggested that the solar cycle had hit bottom in 2008.

    Maybe not. Sunspot counts for 2009 have dropped even lower. As of March 31st, there were no sunspots on 78 of the year's 90 days (87%).

    It adds up to one inescapable conclusion: "We're experiencing a very deep solar minimum," says solar physicist Dean Pesnell of the Goddard Space Flight Center.

    "This is the quietest sun we've seen in almost a century," agrees sunspot expert David Hathaway of the Marshall Space Flight Center.



    Above: The sunspot cycle from 1995 to the present. The jagged curve traces actual sunspot counts. Smooth curves are fits to the data and one forecaster's predictions of future activity. Credit: David Hathaway, NASA/MSFC. [more]

    Quiet suns come along every 11 years or so. It's a natural part of the sunspot cycle, discovered by German astronomer Heinrich Schwabe in the mid-1800s. Sunspots are planet-sized islands of magnetism on the surface of the sun; they are sources of solar flares, coronal mass ejections and intense UV radiation. Plotting sunspot counts, Schwabe saw that peaks of solar activity were always followed by valleys of relative calm—a clockwork pattern that has held true for more than 200 years: plot.

    The current solar minimum is part of that pattern. In fact, it's right on time. "We're due for a bit of quiet—and here it is," says Pesnell.

    But is it supposed to be this quiet? In 2008, the sun set the following records:
    Much more at the link.

    NASA
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  2. #2  
    Member bflavin's Avatar
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    What really sucks is radio propagation is way the hell down without the sun spots. Ham radio guys can't make contacts for as long of distances. Granted, every now and again the bands will open up, but I don't think it's anything too spectacular.
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  3. #3  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    I always get a kick out of how proponents of global warming are ready to believe that MAN is causing climate change while the sun couldn't possibly be a factor . . .
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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