Thread: Samuel Adams of Massachusetts

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  1. #1 Samuel Adams of Massachusetts 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    That reminded me of the wisdom of one of my favorite original signers: Samuel Adams of Massachusetts
    (bio from Library of Congress).


    Here assembled are several quotes of Mr. Adams' wisdom. What strikes me most is how these words still ring with truth today. They are also "self evident" and can fit a variety of discussions of today's political issues.

    As a tribute to the Declaration , I would like to reflect on the words of one of the signers: Samuel Adams of Massachusetts:

    Samuel Adams
    1722-1803

    Representing Massachusetts at the Continental Congress
    Birthplace: Boston, Mass.
    Education: Master of Arts, Harvard. (Politician)
    Work: Tax-collector; Elected to Massachusetts Assembly, 1765; Delegate to the First Continental Congress, 1774; Signed Declaration of Independence, 1776; Member of Massachusetts State constitutional convention, 1781; Appointed Lieutenant Governor of Mass., 1789; Elected Governor of Massachusetts, 1794-'97.
    Died: October 2, 1803
    ...............................
    Samuel and John Adams' names are almost synonymous in all accounts of the Revolution that grew, largely, out of Boston. Though they were cousins and not brothers, they were often referred to as the Adams' brothers, or simply as the Adams'. Samuel Adams was born in Boston, son of a merchant and brewer. He was an excellent politician, an unsuccessful brewer, and a poor businessman. His early public office as a tax collector might have made him suspect as an agent of British authority, however he made good use of his understanding of the tax codes and wide acquaintance with the merchants of Boston. Samuel was a very visible popular leader who, along with John, spend a great deal of time in the public eye agitating for resistance. In 1765 he was elected to the Massachusetts Assembly where he served as clerk for many years. It was there that he was the first to propose a continental congress. He was a leading advocate of republicanism and a good friend of Tom Paine. In 1774, he was chosen to be a member of the provincial council during the crisis in Boston. He was then appointed as a representative to the Continental Congress, where he was most noted for his oratory skills, and as a passionate advocate of independence from Britain. In 1776, as a delegate to the Continental Congress, he signed the Declaration of Independence. Adams retired from the Congress in 1781 and returned to Massachusetts to become a leading member of that states convention to form a constitution. In 1789 he was appointed lieutenant governor of the state. In 1794 he was elected Governor, and was re-elected annually until 1797 when he retired for health reasons. He died in the morning of October 2, 1803, in his home town of Boston.

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    The said constitution shall never be construed to authorize Congress to prevent the people of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms.
    ......................
    A general dissolution of the principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy.... While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but once they lose their virtue, they will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.... If virtue and knowledge are diffused among the people, they will never be enslaved. This will be their great security.
    .....................
    How strangely will the Tools of a Tyrant pervert the plain Meaning of Words!
    ....................
    The liberties of our country, the freedom of our civil Constitution, are worth defending at all hazards; and it is our duty to defend them against all attacks. We have received them as a fair inheritance from our worthy ancestors: they purchased them for us with toil and danger and expense of treasure and blood, and transmitted them to us with care and diligence. It will bring an everlasting mark of infamy on the present generation, enlightened as it is, if we should suffer them to be wrested from us by violence without a struggle, or to be cheated out of them by the artifices of false and designing men.
    ................................
    Among the natural rights of the colonists are these: first, a right to life; secondly, to liberty; thirdly to property; together with the right to support and defend them in the best manner they can.
    ............................
    It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds.
    ..........................
    If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen.
    ............................
    The right to freedom being the gift of Almighty God, it is not in the power of man to alienate this gift and voluntarily become a slave.
    .......................
    It is a very great mistake to imagine that the object of loyalty is the authority and interest of one individual man, however dignified by the applause or enriched by the success of popular actions.
    ...............................
    If ever a time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.

    --Samuel Adams

    http://mikesamerica.blogspot.com/200...ation-and.html
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  2. #2  
    Member Radix's Avatar
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    Good stuff.

    I saved the link and will be using some of the material down the road.

    Thanks.
    These are not the good old days.
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