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  1. #1 Most popular name for babies? An unusual one 
    Most popular name for babies? An unusual one



    2008: WHAT'S IN A NAME?

    The Social Security Administration tracks the top 1,000 baby names for each year. You can see the top 50 most popular names of 2008 in the interactive graphic above, but here are some examples from the middle and bottom of the list:

    Rank Boys Girls

    500 Kale Samara

    501 Jermaine Skye

    502 Leon Kali

    503 Rodney America

    504 Kristian Lexie


    996 Kolten Carleigh

    997 Damari Iyana

    998 Hugh Kenley

    999 Jensen Sloane

    1000 Yurem Elianna


    Source: ssa.gov/OACT/babynames

    The large-scale study of trends in baby-naming by psychologists Jean Twenge and W. Keith Campbell is based on an analysis of names on applications for Social Security numbers of 325 million Americans born between 1880 and 2007.

    Twenge, an associate professor at San Diego State University, will present the results Saturday at a conference of the Association for Psychological Science in San Francisco. Campbell is at the University of Georgia-Athens.

    Twenge says that the trend of giving children less common names started after World War II and that the most dramatic decline in the more common names occurred during the 1990s, followed by this decade.

    People today are more interested in standing out rather than fitting in, she says: "Being unique is now popular."

    In 1955, 32% of boys had one of the year's 10 most popular names, but by 2007, just 9% had names on that list. For girls, 22% had a top-10 name in 1955 vs. 8% in 2007, the study found.

    The study accounted for naming trends as the result of immigration, race and ethnicity, and the same pattern held true, Twenge says.

    "People wanted to try to fit in the melting pot, and now people want to embrace their diverse heritage, diverse viewpoint and diverse look," says Pamela Redmond Satran, co-author of 10 books on baby names.

    Another study, published online this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found the same move toward uniqueness when it looked at 8,000 U.S. names between 1900 and 2004 and 2,570 names during the same period in France.

    "If names get too popular, people may not want them anymore," says co-author Jonah Berger, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

    Twenge, co-author with Campbell of the new book The Narcissism Epidemic, suggests there is a connection between an increase in narcissism in society and wanting baby names that are less common.
    People are naming their kids after vegetables? I'd just have a hard time taking somebody named "kale" seriously when I grow bushels of the stuff in my yard every year.

    USA Today
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Whatever happened to nice names? At least I use Shakespeare's characters for my pets' names. My cat is Miranda (The Tempest) and my dog is Katie (Kate, from Taming Of The Shrew).
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  3. #3  
    Resident Unliked Meanie Shannon's Avatar
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    I know a pregnant girl who is naming her son Colton. First I've heard the name. She was going to name it America if it was a girl. I've been hearing that one often lately. My best friend has a 7 year old daughter named Madison. I tried to talk her out of that name.
    Loyalty Binds Me- Motto of Richard III
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  4. #4  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shannon View Post
    I know a pregnant girl who is naming her son Colton. First I've heard the name. She was going to name it America if it was a girl. I've been hearing that one often lately. My best friend has a 7 year old daughter named Madison. I tried to talk her out of that name.



    Madeline or Madelein, or however you want to spell it, is a better name for a girl than Madison.
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