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  1. #1 Bears among us: 20,000 pounds of fish flesh is a lure the animals cannot resist. 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Bears among us: Too close for comfort?

    At least 20 grizzly bears, likely more, come to feed at the stream at some point each summer.

    Never before has there been a bear mauling in town.

    Not that the horrific attack on 15-year-old mountain biker Petra Davis last weekend came as a shock to those familiar with local bears. A small group of wildlife biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game have been warning for years that something like this could happen in popular Far North Bicentennial Park on the city's eastern edge.
    Why?Because of the salmon in Campbell Creek.

    The minimum spawning goal for king salmon there is 70 fish. But for years now almost a thousand of the big salmon have reached the spawning grounds every summer. Until a children-only fishery began this year, no people were allowed to fish for these salmon. They all went to the bears. Some 20,000 pounds of fish flesh is a lure the animals cannot resist. The bears come for the kings, and they stay for the subsequent runs of reds and silvers.

    Research biologist Sean Farley concluded at least 20 grizzly bears, likely more, come to feed at the stream at some point each summer. Farley knows he didn't get a record of all the grizzlies visiting the creek, and he didn't even try to count the black bears that might sneak in and try to grab a fish here and there.


    http://www.adn.com/front/story/456830.html
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  2. #2  
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
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    Jim Renkert, a local skier vying for a spot on the U.S. Olympic nordic ski team in the 1980s, trained by running through the area in those years. He never worried about bears and rarely saw one. Now, he said, encounters are regular enough that he usually carries bear spray.

    Bear SPRAY??? I'd be packing a .357 Mag. minimum!!! Screw the spray.

    Too many bears??? Obviously it's the BFEE's fault and Global Warming...:D
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  3. #3  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarasotaRepub View Post
    Bear SPRAY??? I'd be packing a .357 Mag. minimum!!! Screw the spray.

    Too many bears??? Obviously it's the BFEE's fault and Global Warming...:D
    A 357 isn't big enough for a grizzley .How does that story go about Grizzly droppings ?Something about little bells and pepper smelling bear turds ?

    Subject: FW: BIG BEAR "Ehhhh..."

    This is disturbring. Look at the size of the paw!! The following pictures are of a man who works for the Forest Service in Alaska. He was out deer hunting and a large world record Grizzly charged him from about 50 yards away. The guy unloaded a 7mm Mag Semi-auto Into the bear and it dropped a few feet from him. The bear was still alive so He reloaded and capped it in the head. It was over one thousand six hundred pounds and 12' 6" high at the shoulder. It's a world record. The bear had killed a couple of people. Of course, the game department did not let him keep it.

    Think about it. This thing on its hind legs could walk up to the Average single story house and could look on the roof at eye level. Also his last meal was human.
    http://www.breakthechain.org/exclusives/bigbear.html
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  4. #4  
    Senior Betwixt Member Bubba Dawg's Avatar
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    Yeah. It takes a heavy duty round to take down a griz or even a big black bear. East of the Mississippi bears tend to be smaller than out west. Can't say why but it's true.

    The bears out west are monsters. 44 mag at minimum.

    And that many Grizzlies that close to the city? Jeez.
    Hey careful man! There's a beverage here!
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  5. #5  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Grizzly bears prey upon other predators including hunters
    Game Range Ramblin's,Seeley Lake, Montana:Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

    Anymore the sound of a rifle shot in the Upper Blackfoot River Basin is an invitation to various scavengersincluding a few grizzly bears that have learned to associate hunting season with gut piles, blood trails, wounded game and animal carcasses.

    In the last two years Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) in Region 2 has responded to several incidents of grizzlies taking big game away from hunters. FWP has also found evidence that more and more grizzly bears are learning that rifle shots and hunter activity mean food.

    Last year, for example, in Woodworth, MT, near the Kozy Korner Steak House, a female grizzly with two yearlings followed hunters back to their house and devoured an elk that was hanging on a "meat pole" in their back yard.

    This fall, near Ovando, MT, a subadult grizzly discovered that bow hunters in Hunting District 290 were also excellent providers, and that tree stands were good sites to locate food. The bear was tracking hunters and scavenging gut piles and carcasses. Needless to say, hunters were uneasy about the grizzly, especially after the occasional visit. The bear "took over" at least four deer carcasses and on one occasion stole a deer out of an open barn.

    One bow hunter observed the bear, nose to the ground, following a wounded deer. The hunter shot the deer shortly before dark and within minutes noticed the grizzly. "All of a sudden the bear appeared and began sniffing the ground. At first it followed the deer's back trail and then it turned and went after the deer."

    The bear, a young 350-pound female, was trapped and relocated to the Middle Fork of the Flathead country. In extreme cases, when grizzlies are overly comfortable around humans and are in danger of being poached or becoming "management bears," they can be relocated in hopes that the move will increase their chances of survival. Usually, after an extended journey, the bear comes back home.

    This fall at least four additional rifle hunters had grizzly bears take possession of their elk. In future years more hunters will lose big game to grizzlies. Grizzly bears and black bears will take advantage of another predator's hard work. Many a coyote, wolf, mountain lion and now big game hunter have lost their "kills" to these thieving bruins. When it comes to scavenging carcasses, bears are the experts.

    While working in Glacier National Park on a wolf/mountain lion interaction study, the Hornocker Wildlife Research Institute discovered that both wolves and lions regularly had "kills" taken away by individual bears. Last summer an excited Ninemile Valley resident phoned FWP. "Four wolves just killed a deer in my backyard, and now a big black bear is dragging it up the hill. What should I do?"

    "Grab your binoculars and watch the show, "I said. "This is a once-in-a-lifetime experience."

    It's a different story, however, if the carcass being dragged away by a grizzly is your first six-point bull or an elk that took two days to pack out. Therefore hunters should always assume that grizzlies might be in the area and take the necessary precautions.

    When hunting in grizzly country, the golden rule is "24 hours to get that animal out of the woods." The longer a carcass remains lying on the ground, hung up in hunting camp, or in the back of a truck, the more likely it will be discovered by a grizzly. The faster elk and deer are taken home and butchered, the better.

    Carcasses left in the mountains overnight should be cached and made to be visible from a distance. Locate an observation point and clear the brush in that direction. Cover the animal with branches and sticks and mark it with a piece of clothing or flagging. Drag the gut pile away from the carcass and cover it with brush. Before leaving, walk to the observation point and memorize the site.

    Next morning, approach the downed animal carefully. Yell or whistle repeatedly. Study the scene from the observation point and scan the area for movement. Grizzly bears often drag the carcass a short distance before caching it under a mountain of dirt and debris. If a grizzly bear is at site and refuses to leave or the meat has been cached and is not salvageable, report the incident to FWP. Hunters who have lost an animal to a grizzly may be eligible for another license.

    If you live in grizzly country, it is best not to hang carcasses behind the house or in the garage for extended periods. Big game carcasses stored outside should be hung from a stout 15 foot "meat pole" at least 25 to 30 feet off the ground. The elk or deer should be swinging from the center of the pole and well above a bear's reach. Grizzly bears are quite ingenious and have been known to climb trees and stand on snow machines in order to reach carcasses.

    Some grizzly bears are opportunists and change their behavior in order to take advantage of new food sources. So if you are hunting or living in grizzly country, always assume that grizzlies are in the area and make sure your camps, cabins and homes are bear proof, and that bear attractants are contained or removed. If you have any questions pertaining to hunting or living in grizzly bear country, please call me at 542-5508.
    http://www.seeleyswanpathfinder.com/...izzlyprey.html
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