Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1 Documents from Gettysburg 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    22,891
    Author:E.P. Alexander
    CSA General Army Engineers, Artillery
    .....................................
    E.P. Alexander was Chief Of Artillary CSA

    ....................................
    Commentary
    After the battle of Chancellorsville, the Confederates were presented with an opportunity not often enjoyed during their four year struggle for independence. Hooker and the AoP was stunned by its recent loss and not in any disposition to advance. Grant and his army was invested at Vicksburg. Bragg and his Army of Tennessee held Rosecrans immobile at Murfreesboro. One could almost feel that something was about to give way. The time was right for the Confederates to take the initiative, the problem was in determining where.
    ......................................
    The determination of the best plan consumed the high command of the Confederate army for the
    remainer of May. The most immediate threat the Confederates faced was the impending loss of Vicksburg and thus the Mississippi, which would effectively divide the Confederacy and cut her off from desperately needed supplies from Texas, then a point of entry for goods coming from Europe as well as providing its own foodstuffs. So, the planning looked toward removing the pressure off Pemberton, then holed up, fending off Grant.
    ..................................
    Briefly, several, most notably Longstreet, preferred a Western concentration of forces against Rosecrans, a move which would hopefully force Grant to come to his assistance. Others however preferred giving Virginia itself special protection, moving to the offense in the East and threatening Washington, drawing Hooker away from Falmouth and, with success, Grant away from Vicksburg.
    ....................................
    In his memoirs, E.P. Alexander sums up the situation and gives his opinion, which jibes perfectly with Longstreet's, of the best course of action: --
    ..........................
    Document
    "It was now for Lee to take the offensive -- a role appealing strongly to his disposition. The defensive was to invite the enemy to accumulate his resources to the point at which their very weight would crush us. But, for a brief period, we enjoyed a choice of the field of action. It was a fatal mistake that in this choice we failed to utilize the single advantage in the game of war, which the Confederacy enjoyed.
    ...............................
    "We occupied the 'Interior Lines,' and could reenforce from one flank to the other, across our country, more quickly than the enemy could discover and follow our movements by round-about routes. Only by such transfers of her armies could the South ever hope to face her adversaries with superior, or even with equal, numbers -- by demanding double duty of her regiments, fighting battles with them alternately in the east and in the west. In Lee we had a leader of phenomenal ability, could this policy have been adopted under his direction.
    ..................................
    Here in May, 1863, was presented a rare opportunity to inaugurate what might be called an 'Army of Wheels' within the Confederate lines, as distinguished from an Army of Invasion beyond them. The situation was this. Grant was investing Vicksburg with 60,000 men, and we were threatened with the loss of the Mississippi River, and of 30,000 men at Vicksburg under Pemberton. At Jackson, Mississippi, Johnston, with scarcely 24,000 men, was looking on and begging vainly for reenforcements.
    ..............................
    "At Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Bragg, with almost 45,000 Confederates, confronted Rosecrans with about 84,000. Neither felt strong enough for the aggressive, and the whole spring and summer passed idly.

    At Knoxville were about 5000 Confederates under Buckner, and there were also scattered brigades in southwest Virginia and eastern North Carolina, from which reenforcements might be drawn. In this state of affairs, Longstreet, with Hood's and Pickett's divisions, arrived in Petersburg, under orders to rejoin Lee at Fredericksburg. Hooker had just been driven across the Rappahannock, and his army was soon to lose largely from the expiration of terms of service of many regiments.
    .......................................
    "Nothing aggressive was probably from him for many weeks. Longstreet's veteran divisions, about 13,000 strong, could have been placed on the cars at Petersburg and hurried out to Bragg, via Lynchburg and Knoxville. Johnston's 25,000 from Jackson and Buckner's 5000 from Knoxville, could have meet them. With these accessions, and with Lee in command, Rosecrans might have been defeated, and an advance made into Kentucky, threatening Louisville and Cincinnati.

    If anything could have caused Grant's recall from Vicksburg, it would have been this. Surely the chances of success were greater, and of disaster less, than those involved in crossing the bridgeless Potomac, into the heart of the enemy's home country, where ammunition and supplies must come by wagons from Stauton, nearly 200 miles, over roads exposed to raids of the enemy from either the east or the west. In this position, a drawn battle, or even a victory, would still leave us compelled soon to find our way back across the Potomac."

    Source: Military Memoirs of a Confederate
    http://www.tennessee-scv.org/longstreet/getdocs.htm
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Resident Grandpa marv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Shell Knob, MO
    Posts
    3,020
    ...some stuff to spend a rainy evening reading...

    http://www.homepages.dsu.edu/jankej/...ar/diaries.htm

    http://members.socket.net/~mcruzan/images/allen-west.jpg

    Four boxes keep us free: the soap box, the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box.

    THIS POST WILL BE MONITORED BY THE NSA
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    22,891
    Quote Originally Posted by marv View Post
    ...some stuff to spend a rainy evening reading...

    http://www.homepages.dsu.edu/jankej/...ar/diaries.htm
    should I continue ?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    22,891
    Documents from Gettysburg .

    July 1st 1863
    Author:E.P. Alexander
    CSA General Army Engineers, Artillery


    Commentary
    From the moment Longstreet first viewed the field at Gettysburg, he had objected to fighting a battle there. Appreciating the successes of the first day's battle, he felt it provided a perfect opportunity to delay the Federals while the ANV moved around the Federal left to place itself in a position between the AoP and Washington, in accordance with the general strategy that had been agreed upon before leaving Virginia.

    Longstreet's thoughts on the matter were wisely considered. Just days before, when Lee and Longstreet first discovered that the Federals had pursued and entered Maryland without their knowledge, the campaign's success had been threatened. But now, there was a perfect opportunity, suited to the strengths of Lee and his army.

    Alexander describes Lee's and Longstreet's first meeting at Gettysburg near the end of the first day. During this brief exchange, the course of the next two days was set, and almost everything could be predicted from the divergent words of the two men.
    .................................................. ...........
    Document
    "During the afternoon [of July 1st], Longstreet had joined Lee on Seminary Ridge overlooking the town, and had noted the position being taken by the enemy. He had said to Lee: 'We could not call the enemy to a position better suited to our plans. We have only to file around his left and secure good ground between him and his capital.'

    "To his surprise, Lee had answered, 'If he is there tomorrow, I shall attack him.'
    Longstreet replied, 'If he is there tomorrow, it will be because he wants you to attack him.'"
    Source: Military Memoirs of a Confederate
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •