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  1. #1 Boomers: Still Whining After All These Years. 
    Baby Boomers Got the Blues
    Viewing Life Through Morose-Colored Glasses


    By Monica Hesse

    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Thursday, July 10, 2008; Page C01

    The baby boomers -- that prominent group of middle-agers whose massive numbers invite never-ending dissection and speculation -- have once again spoken. What they have said is, " Waaaaaahhh."

    This is according to a social and demographic trends survey released recently by the Pew Research Center. The survey measured the pessimism, dissatisfaction and general curmudgeonliness of 2,413 adults in various generations.

    The results validate any member of the Greatest Generation who ever looked at his or her offspring and sadly thought, "soft." Simply put, boomers are a bunch of . . . whiners.

    More than older or younger generations, boomers -- born from 1946 to 1964 -- worry that their income won't keep up with rising costs of living. They say it's harder to get ahead today than it was 10 years ago. They are more likely to say that their standard of living is lower than their folks' but that things don't look too good for their kids either (67 percent of younger generations, meanwhile, feel they have it better than their parents).

    (snip)

    Sigh. Those poor, tortured boomers, slouching around like our angsty brother who insists on being called "Holden."

    Perpetually restless, utterly mysterious and so very multitudinous -- 76 million -- that the rest of us are doomed to study them, analyze them, wave shiny objects around for them. We write scores of books about them, with titles like "Age Power" and "Boomer Consumer: Ten New Rules for Marketing to America's Largest, Wealthiest and Most Influential Group."

    It's all part of the frantic tap dance of figuring out how to raise boomers' tender and flagging happiness, when what we want to say is, BUCK UP ALREADY.
    Read the whole thing. :D

    Babies
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  2. #2  
    Resident Unliked Meanie Shannon's Avatar
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    That's all they ever do.
    Loyalty Binds Me- Motto of Richard III
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    Senior Member FeebMaster's Avatar
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    I blame their parents.
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  4. #4  
    noonwitch
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    I'm technically a boomer by about 2 months, but the people who are generally though of as boomers, 10-20 years older than me, are one of the most annoying generations ever. They think they are the center of the universe, and so much more special than everyone else.


    Wait until I open up my chain of psychedelic nursing homes in about 15 years, when I retire from my current job. I'll get my social security money, even if I have to steal it from aging hippies!
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    Senior Member LogansPapa's Avatar
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    Post WWII and what their mothers and fathers witnessed overseas - this is a surprise?
    At Coretta Scott King's funeral in early 2006, Ethel Kennedy, the widow of Robert Kennedy, leaned over to him and whispered, "The torch is being passed to you." "A chill went up my spine," Obama told an aide. (Newsweek)
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    I chortled over that article this morning. It's a spot-on indictment of my generation, and I was born smack in the middle of it, in one of the most populous birth years of the boom.

    Logan's Papa's remark is right on the money. My parents were both in WWII (Mom in the ETO, Dad in the Pacific), and several years ago I was talking with my Dad about how indulged my generation was. He said that after the war, all people wanted was to settle down and make life as "normal" and comfortable as possible. I said to him, "My generation never had to struggle with anything." His answer was succinct:

    "We didn't want you to."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shannon View Post
    That's all they ever do.
    Hey! :mad: :D
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    Super Moderator bijou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I'm technically a boomer by about 2 months, but the people who are generally though of as boomers, 10-20 years older than me, are one of the most annoying generations ever. They think they are the center of the universe, and so much more special than everyone else.


    Wait until I open up my chain of psychedelic nursing homes in about 15 years, when I retire from my current job. I'll get my social security money, even if I have to steal it from aging hippies!
    What a great idea. Maybe I shall start my own version for the younger boomers, a chain of Punk rest homes. :D
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    I chortled over that article this morning. It's a spot-on indictment of my generation, and I was born smack in the middle of it, in one of the most populous birth years of the boom.

    Logan's Papa's remark is right on the money. My parents were both in WWII (Mom in the ETO, Dad in the Pacific), and several years ago I was talking with my Dad about how indulged my generation was. He said that after the war, all people wanted was to settle down and make life as "normal" and comfortable as possible. I said to him, "My generation never had to struggle with anything." His answer was succinct:

    "We didn't want you to."
    I was watching something on VH1 (I think) last night that was essentially parodying the "ideal" suburban nuclear family of the 50s and 60s with a lot of old footage. I began to think about the mores, assumptions, social structures of that era and the more I thought, the more they seemed abnormal in the course of history.

    While we, the Boomers, and the following generations seem to take these as the "gold standard" with which to measure how far we have deviated, I'm becoming more convinced that they were an aberration, based, as you say, upon the desire of the WWII generation to create a structure of "normalcy." Perhaps they were striving to ensure there would be no more "Lost Generations?"
    Last edited by Cold Warrior; 07-10-2008 at 12:40 PM.
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    The Fifties were definitely an aberration. But when the Largest Generation (as opposed to the Greatest Generation) grew up in it, it automatically became the norm.
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