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  1. #11  
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    America's Most Hated Foods

    20. Blueberries
    19. Maple Syrup
    18. Cilantro
    17. Onions
    16. Cooked Carrots
    15. Raisins
    14. Peas
    13. Oysters
    12. Pea Soup
    11. Sour Cream

    10. Gelatin


    9. Tuna Fish


    8. Brussels Sprouts


    7. Beets


    6. Okra


    5. Eggs


    4. Mushrooms


    3. Mayonnaise


    2. Lima Beans


    And the number one most hated food in America?


    1. Liver

    I like everything in red and hate everything in green.

    Lima beans and okra are two of my favorite foods.

    I cannot believe maple syrup and blueberries are on anybody's list of most hated foods.
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  2. #12  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    Have you ever prepared the raw kidneys by boiling them until all of the urine is removed then peeling the outer membrane off and slicing them .

    The smell of a pot full of boiling urine impregnated bulls kidneys is incredible especially in a winter sealed kitchen !
    :eek:
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  3. #13  
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    I absolutely hate sweet potatoes and tripes.
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  4. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Words fail.
    Consider the source.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  5. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teetop View Post
    I absolutely hate sweet potatoes and tripes.
    Tripe, like any other organ meat, is not for me. Sweet potatoes, though.... baked like a regular potato and with a little butter, brown sugar and cinnamon added...... mmm.....
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  6. #16  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Words fail.
    That's exactly how one prepares Kidneys before eating .Those things are filters in the urinary tract and as such need to be fully cleaned before eating them .You also have to check them for stones !
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  7. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    That's exactly how one prepares Kidneys before eating .Those things are filters in the urinary tract and as such need to be fully cleaned before eating them .You also have to check them for stones !
    I'll take your word for all that. For right now, though, I'll just stick to the steak part of the steak and kidney pie. :eek:
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  8. #18  
    Super Moderator bijou's Avatar
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    Straying outside the list I will add parsnips, turnips, swede, sweet potato and squash I can't bear sweet vegetables.
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  9. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I'll take your word for all that. For right now, though, I'll just stick to the steak part of the steak and kidney pie. :eek:
    You turn up your nose at Kidneys But the early Danes were no slouches when it came to weird meats !

    An excerpt from Aguecheek’s Beef, Belch’s Hiccup, and Other Gastronomic Interjections literature, culture, and food among the early moderns
    ..................................................

    The Cookbook as Literature

    “incipit libellus de arte coquinaria,”

    the manuscript starts off: “Here begins the little book on the art of cookery.” Its first entry, with a heading in Latin and a recipe in Old Danish, reads as follows:

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Quomodo fiet oleum de nucibus.
    Man skal takae en dysk mæthe nutæ kyænæ, oc en æggy skalæ full mæth salt, oc latæ them samæn i en heet mortel oc stampæ thæt wæl, oc writhæ gømæn et klæthæ; tha warthær thæt oly.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The modern editor renders it in English thus:

    How to make walnut oil.
    One should take a dish of walnut kernels and an eggshell full of salt, and place them together in a heated mortar; pound them well and wring through a cloth. Then it becomes oil.

    The “little book” may be the oldest surviving manuscript of its kind written in a modern European language, though similar manuscripts show up from about the same time, perhaps only a few years later, in Italy, France, and England. Dating from about 1300, the book is a carefully produced, decorated manuscript bound in codex along with a text on plants (that is, an “herbal”) and a text on the art of stonecutting. Its headings are all in Latin: “De salso ad carnes recentas apto” (About a sauce for fresh meat); “Quomodo conficatur pastellum de medullis cervorum” (How to prepare a pasty of deer marrow); “Item aliud temperatum pullorum” (Another way of preparing chicken). The rest is in idiomatic Danish, though with some borrowings from other European languages. Editors have long suspected that the collection is a translation of an earlier work written in Middle Low German, which itself may have been based on a text of Mediterranean origin; and slightly later versions of the text appear in Icelandic and Low German as well as a second Danish manuscript. It is not a lengthy or elaborate book. In its first extant version, it contains only twenty-five recipes and speaks to only a small repertory of ingredients and procedures. But the text is not unsystematic or lacking in thoroughness. After it explains how to make walnut oil, it goes on to specify the making of almond oil, almond butter, and almond milk.

    .................................................
    In any case, manuscripts of De re coquinaria certainly circulated in quattrocento Italy and were discussed in humanist circles, and in 1498, in two separate editions—one from Venice, one from Milan—the ancient cookbook was reproduced in print, making it only the second book of cookery published in Italy, after Platina’s hybrid text. But the effect was literary rather than culinary. Although a historical interest in antiquity, including its mundane customs, only grew with the centuries, there is no record of anyone in Renaissance Italy actually trying to serve an ancient Roman dinner. In all likelihood, some tried. But as Platina indicates, whatever poets or painters did in their relation to antiquity and the rinascimento of learning, cooks had little use for Roman precedents.

    In some respects, that may have been a shame. The Lucanian sausage that Platina alludes to is rendered by Apicius as follows:

    Pound pepper, cumin, savory, rue, parsley, mixed herbs, laurel-berries, and liquamen, and mix with this well-beaten meat, pounding it again with the ground spice mixture. Work in liquamen, peppercorns, plenty of fat and pine-kernels, insert into a sausage-skin, drawn out very thin, and hang in the smoke.

    .................................................. ...............
    This is far more interesting than Martino/Platina’s salsicce. Martino doesn’t know how to add texture and brightly contrasting tastes to a sausage as Apicius does with his laurel berries and pine nuts; nor does he avail himself of fresh herbs. The cuisine that unfolds in De re coquinaria speaks for a cuisine that is perhaps more copious in the range of ingredients and combinations of tastes it procures than anything the medieval kitchen could produce. Apician cookery is the product of an empire with vast material resources and far-flown commodity exchanges—oil from Greece, wine from Crete, spices from Egypt, seafood from the Iberian Atlantic as well from the whole of the Mediterranean, livestock from Gaul, fruits and nuts from northern Africa, grains from everywhere, not to mention good supplies of fresh produce from local providers—and it provisions an elite with as complex and varied and wide a palate as it can contrive for it, without exceeding the limits beyond which lie incoherence. The results—fermented fish sauces and currylike stocks for braising, stewing, and seasoning (garum and liquamen), helpings of olives, figs, ground herbs, spices, honey, oils, and breads, served up with main dishes like stuffed, steamed mullet, stewed peas “Vitellius,” and oven-roasted dormice, served with honey and poppy seeds—were capable of being corrupted into the coarse luxury that Petronius’s Satyricon satirizes in its chapter “Dinner with Trimalchio.”

    And even the modern reader may on occasion feel that the recipes go too far, that they challenge the palate rather than pleasing it. But no less than the rudimentary Libellus or Martino’s masterly Libro de arte coquinaria, De re coquinaria of Apicius re-creates a culinary world that, however far-flung, expresses a unified vocabulary and syntax. Apicius has a way of making things.

    http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/021262.html

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  10. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I won't eat mayo
    Commie.
    Be Not Afraid.
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