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  1. #1 Mom, Kid Fight For Right To Bike To School. 
    School district could backpedal on policy

    Saratoga Springs board to consider modifying ban on riding bikes to schools
    By DENNIS YUSKO, Staff writer

    First published in print: Tuesday, September 29, 2009

    SARATOGA SPRINGS -- Seventh-grader Adam Marino is getting a firsthand lesson in civil disobedience.

    The 12-year-old and his mother, Janette Kaddo Marino, are defying Saratoga Springs school policy by biking to Maple Avenue Middle School on Route 9. The Jackson Street residents pedal more than four miles together each way to the middle school on nice days despite being told not to by school officials and police.

    "I guess you can say that we continue to do what we feel is our right," Kaddo Marino said recently. "We feel strongly we have a right to get to school by a mode of transportation we deem appropriate."

    Their methods may be unconventional, but the Marinos are part of a growing number of Americans challenging the sedentary habits of today's youths and what they view as overanxious "helicopter" parenting. As fewer children walk and bike to school nationwide, parents have started groups like the "Walking School Bus," which promotes physical activity and fitness in youth by having them walk to school with adults.

    Parents and teachers at Niskayuna's Hillside Elementary School implemented the state's first Walking School Bus program. Separately, this week marks the end of the first "Children and Nature: Saratoga -- Come Out and Play," a week of outdoor events in Saratoga Springs coordinated by the local chapter of a national organization that seeks to "reconnect" children and their families to the outdoors.

    Riding his 21-speed Giant mountain bike to school benefits Adam Marino's health and the environment, his mother says, and Adam believes it makes him a better student. "It would be really nice if it got changed," he said of the school policy.

    The youngster may get his way.

    While the school district does not allow elementary school or Maple Avenue students to ride bikes to school, that could change in the coming weeks, Superintendent Janice White said. The Board of Education could vote to amend the policy on Oct. 13, when it is scheduled to discuss a recommendation from a district-formed committee.

    "Supervised, parent/guardian bike riding may be permitted at specific sites in the future," White said in an interview Friday. The school has no legal responsibility over what occurs on Route 9, she added.

    The biking debate started last spring, when school district officials told Kaddo Marino that Adam was violating school rules by biking to class. Walking to the school also is not permitted.
    This is insane. Do they seriously believe that pedophiles are going to chase down kids on bikes? :eek:

    Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories...#ixzz0SbHmMFT4
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  2. #2  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Pedalphiles may!
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  3. #3  
    Power CUer
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    I don't think it's an issue of pedophiles:

    "Route 9 is a state road also called Maple Avenue. The suburban thoroughfare is busy with cars and businesses. It has crosswalks and wide shoulders, but no bike lanes."

    The school is probably worried that someone who had a biking or pedestrian accident on the road would sue the school.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    I don't think it's an issue of pedophiles:

    "Route 9 is a state road also called Maple Avenue. The suburban thoroughfare is busy with cars and businesses. It has crosswalks and wide shoulders, but no bike lanes."

    The school is probably worried that someone who had a biking or pedestrian accident on the road would sue the school.
    Then have them get waivers signed. Or they could just put in a bike lane if the shoulders are so wide. Why aren't they afraid that a parent will sue the school after getting into a car accident on the way to school?
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