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  1. #1 Health Care Bill To Cover Prayer Treatments. 
    Healthcare provision seeks to embrace prayer treatments

    A little-noticed measure would put Christian Science healing sessions on the same footing as clinical medicine. Critics say it violates the separation of church and state.

    By Tom Hamburger and Kim Geiger

    November 3, 2009
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    Reporting from Washington - Backed by some of the most powerful members of the Senate, a little-noticed provision in the healthcare overhaul bill would require insurers to consider covering Christian Science prayer treatments as medical expenses.

    The provision was inserted by Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) with the support of Democratic Sens. John F. Kerry and the late Edward M. Kennedy, both of Massachusetts, home to the headquarters of the Church of Christ, Scientist.

    The measure would put Christian Science prayer treatments -- which substitute for or supplement medical treatments -- on the same footing as clinical medicine. While not mentioning the church by name, it would prohibit discrimination against "religious and spiritual healthcare."

    It would have a minor effect on the overall cost of the bill -- Christian Science is a small church, and the prayer treatments can cost as little as $20 a day. But it has nevertheless stirred an intense controversy over the constitutional separation of church and state, and the possibility that other churches might seek reimbursements for so-called spiritual healing.

    Phil Davis, a senior Christian Science Church official, said prayer treatment was an effective alternative to conventional healthcare.

    "We are making the case for this, believing there is a connection between healthcare and spirituality," said Davis, who distributed 11,000 letters last week to Senate officials urging support for the measure.

    "We think this is an important aspect of the solution, when you are talking about not only keeping the cost down, but finding effective healthcare," he said.

    The provision would apply only to insurance policies offered on a proposed exchange where consumers could shop for plans that meet standards set by the government.
    Well, why not? I'm sure they've shoe-horned acupuncture, Rolfing, and homeopathic meds into the thing. :p

    LA Times
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  2. #2  
    CU Royalty JB's Avatar
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    Fantastic.

    I can now see Mr. Miyagi for free.
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