Thread: Women in Polish Army (PICTURE GALLERY)

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  1. #1 Women in Polish Army (PICTURE GALLERY) 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Women in Polish Army (PICTURE GALLERY)
    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2448197/posts
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  2. #2  
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    Is this a joke? Is this a bunch of really hairy women? I wanna go look but, then I really don't wanna.
    “The several states composing the United States of America are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government”~~Thomas Jefferson

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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxTenther View Post
    Is this a joke? Is this a bunch of really hairy women? I wanna go look but, then I really don't wanna.
    They're just normal girls in combat down in the dirt with the Polish male troopers !
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    Senior Member stsinner's Avatar
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    Polish army... LOL.. Boy, you sure know how to tell a joke!!!
    Obama-if you're being run out of town, get out in front and pretend that it's a parade!!!
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by stsinner View Post
    Polish army... LOL.. Boy, you sure know how to tell a joke!!!
    That's the French Army.The Polish are actually good fighters.
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    Polish army... LOL.. Boy, you sure know how to tell a joke!!!
    Looks like Truther StMcDickhead needs educating. Again.

    The Polish pilots stood out during the campaign of 1939 and highlighted during the campaign in France. But the most distinguished role they played in 1940 when the decisive for the fate of the England and the coalition Battle of Britain took place (August 8 – October 31, 1940). The British industry produced enough aircraft but it was not possible to train enough pilots in such a short time. Therefore the role of foreign airmen, of whom the greatest group formed the 151 Polish pilots, cannot be overemphasized. They fought both in the British and Polish squadrons (302 and 303 fighter and 300 and 301 bomber squadrons). During the Battle of Britain the Poles shot down 203 Luftwaffe aircraft which stood for 12% of total German losses in this battle.

    The success of the Polish pilots inclined the British command to expand the Polish Air Force: until summer 1941 8 fighter and 4 bomber squadrons emerged. Some new ones were created later on, including the Polish Fighting Team (commonly called the “Skalski’s circus”, named derived from its commander’s surname) that fought in North Africa. Polish pilots protected England, e.g. by destroying 193 German V1 and V2 missiles, and participated in many operations over the continent, escorting the bombers, bombing different targets (e.g. Ruhr, Hamburg, Brema), provided air support to the landing troops during the invasion in June 1944.

    In 1944 the Polish air unit operating from Italy airdropped in Poland men and equipment for the AK, and during the Warsaw Uprising the Polish crews flew 91 times with the supplies for the fighting insurgents. From 1940 to 1945 the Polish squadrons and the Polish pilots serving in British units achieved 621 confirmed kills, and together with campaigns of 1939 and France– 900 confirmed and 189 probable.
    and here

    Poles provided some important help to the Allies throughout the war. Polish soldiers fought on land, on the seas and in the air. Notable was the service of the Polish Air Force, not only in the Allied victory in the Battle of Britain but also the subsequent war in the air; the defense of Tobruk; the capture of the German-held monastery hill of Monte Cassino; a role in the battle of the Falaise pocket; and an airborne brigade parachute drop during Operation Market Garden. Some Polish contributions were less visible, and most notably included the prewar and wartime decyphering of German Enigma machine codes by cryptologists Marian Rejewski and his colleagues. The Polish intelligence network also proved to be of much value to the Allied intelligence.
    Your arrogance is only surpassed by your overweening stupidity.
    Last edited by Sonnabend; 02-13-2010 at 08:16 PM.
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    It was Polish resistance that turned the Warsaw Ghetto into a shining example of the will to be free regardless.

    Poland sent 1500 soldiers to Iraq.

    Polish troops in Afganistan

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWT2lBnTWrY

    Poland is to send an additional ONE THOUSAND troopos to the 'stan, and will continue to support the fight for freedom....they, more than any other, know what it is to languish beneath the bootheel of tyranny.

    SIX MILLION of their people died in the Holocaust...they fought, they bled, they died, they paid in their dearest blood, and what little they had left, they sent to war with the Allies, and earned themselves honour and dignity. British pilots tell of Polish airmen, who threw themselves at the Germans, uncaring whether or not they would die, only if it was to die with their teeth in the German's throat....they kicked the living shit out of the Luftwaffe, and had they not done so, you sanctimonious, superior smug bastard, your D Day landing would have been a fucking bloodbath under German air superiority.
    Last edited by Sonnabend; 02-14-2010 at 12:58 AM.
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    Land battles 1941-1945


    After the defeat of France, the Carpathian Riflemen Brigade left Syria and joined the British forces in Egypt. It was an excellent unit of 5 000 men, mainly experienced soldiers, the 1939 veterans and volunteers. In August 1941 it moved to Libya where it won fame in the heavy fights during the defense of the besieged Tobruk, and in the spring of 1942 in the Libyan Desert.



    About 20 00 men managed to withdraw from France to Great Britain. They formed 1st Polish Corps that was supposed to defend the eastern coast of Scotland, and 1st Independent Parachute Brigade that was supposed to be airdropped in Poland once the national uprising began. In 1941 1st Armored Division was created within the frames of the 1st Corps. However, this army could not develop because the Polish immigration on the British Islands was not very numerous. No Poles were arriving from the conquered by Germany and Italy Europe, and the voluntary recruitment in the United States, Canada and Latin America brought only a few thousand men. Situation changed when after the 3rd Reich’s assault on the Soviet Union. The Polish government signed a treaty with the Soviets guaranteeing (among others) releasing the Polish citizens from prisons and camps and creating Polish Army.



    It was formed under the command of General Władysław Anders. In the spring of 1942 it amounted to more than 70 000 men but it suffered from the lack of officers. The pre-war Polish officers were looked for in vain because it was not known that they were executed two years earlier by the NKVD. The Soviet authorities caused more and more trouble in expanding the army, for example by drastically limiting food rations to 40 000 portions a day. In the same time the situation of the Allies in the Middle East was very difficult, the United States had just begun mobilization, and the Great Britain ran out of reserves. In such conditions it was agreed to evacuate the Polish units to Persia, yet with the army some civilians left as well (mainly children and families of soldiers) – altogether some 114 thousand people.

    From the forces moved to the Middle East (first to Persia, then to Iraq and Palestine) the 2nd Polish Corps emerged. In December 1943 and January 1944 it was transported to the Italian front. About 50 000 soldiers fought for almost year and a half, distinguishing themselves with glory, especially during the bloody struggle to break the Gustav Line. The key position there was the hill and monastery of Monte Cassino, captured by the Poles on May 18, 1944. In July the Corps captured the city and port of Ancona, and in August participated in breaking the Gothic Line at the Adriatic Sea. In 1945 it took part in the spring offensive in the North of Italy, in battles of Faenza and Bolonia, which was first entered by the Polish soldiers. During the campaign in Italy some 2600 of them were killed.

    The Polish forces stationed on the British Islands, reinforced by the soldiers who came from the Soviet Union, prepared to participate in the invasion of the continent. In June 1944, in the operation “Overlord” in Normandy, the Polish Air Force and the navy took part. Then the 1st Armored Division (under the command of Gen. Maczek), total of 16 000 men, 380 tanks and 470 guns was moved to France. It formed a part of the Canadian Corps and won fame in the battles of Falaise and Chambois (August 18 to 22, 1944) where it closed the “cauldron”, cutting off the retreating German divisions.


    Later on it liberated the cities of Abeville, St. Omar and Cassel in France, Ypres and Gent in Belgium and Breda (October 28 to 30, 1944) in the Netherlands, finally capturing the German seaport of Wilhelmshaven. Its combat route amounted to 1800 km, the division destroyed 260 enemy tanks and self-propelled guns, loosing 4600 soldiers, including more than a 1000 of casualties. In September 1944 the 1st Parachute Brigade was airdropped near Arnhem in the Netherlands as a part of the unfortunate “Market-Garden”, suffering great losses.

    When the war in Europe was coming to an end, the Polish troops fighting at the side of the Western Allies numbered more than 210 thousand soldiers, 1335 tanks, about 4000 of armored vehicles, 2050 guns and mortars, 32 thousand different mechanical vessels.

    Do us all a favour, stsinner...shut the fuck up.
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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonnabend View Post
    Looks like Truther StMcDickhead needs educating. Again.

    Fuck off.. You've already been identified as a silly childish hothead with stupid questions and obsessive compulsive disorder.. EABOD...
    Obama-if you're being run out of town, get out in front and pretend that it's a parade!!!
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonnabend View Post
    Do us all a favour, stsinner...shut the fuck up.

    Go fuck yourself, you bitter little bitch.. It was a joke.. The Polish are commonly referred to in jokes as Polacks, and people who act stupid are called polacks as an insult.. It was a light-hearted comment, you silly hotheaded fuck.. Keep working on that stroke as I keep laughing at your stupid ass... LOL....

    Next time don't just bold and underline your silly hotheadedness, but make it a larger font, too.. I can't really tell if you're serious if you don't up the font size, you silly child..
    Last edited by stsinner; 02-14-2010 at 09:23 PM.
    Obama-if you're being run out of town, get out in front and pretend that it's a parade!!!
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