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  1. #1 Wide Web of diversions gets laptops evicted from lecture halls 
    Wide Web of diversions gets laptops evicted from lecture halls

    By Daniel de Vise
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Tuesday, March 9, 2010

    On a windy morning in downtown Washington, a hundred Georgetown Law students gathered in a hall for David Cole's lecture on democracy and coercion. The desks were cluttered with books, Thermoses and half-eaten muffins.

    Cole has banned laptops from his classes, compelling students to take notes the way their parents did: on paper.

    A generation ago, academia embraced the laptop as the most welcome classroom innovation since the ballpoint pen. But during the past decade, it has evolved into a powerful distraction. Wireless Internet connections tempt students away from note-typing to e-mail, blogs, YouTube videos, sports scores, even online gaming -- all the diversions of a home computer beamed into the classroom to compete with the professor for the student's attention.

    "This is like putting on every student's desk, when you walk into class, five different magazines, several television shows, some shopping opportunities and a phone, and saying, 'Look, if your mind wanders, feel free to pick any of these up and go with it,' " Cole said.

    Professors have banned laptops from their classrooms at George Washington University, American University, the College of William and Mary and the University of Virginia, among many others. Last month, a physics professor at the University of Oklahoma poured liquid nitrogen onto a laptop and then shattered it on the floor, a warning to the digitally distracted. A student -- of course -- managed to capture the staged theatrics on video and drew a million hits on YouTube.

    Cole was among the first professors in the Washington region to ban laptops, in the 2006-07 academic year. He found them an "attractive nuisance." It was a bold decree: Georgetown had only recently begun requiring that first-year law students own laptops, after painstakingly upgrading the campus for wireless Internet access.
    Interesting. There's some good research that shows that students retain information better when they write (as opposed to type) lecture notes. The physical formation of words reinforces the auditory experience.

    Wa Po
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member stsinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Interesting. There's some good research that shows that students retain information better when they write (as opposed to type) lecture notes. The physical formation of words reinforces the auditory experience.

    Wa Po

    I used to record lectures on a micro-cassette recorder...
    Obama-if you're being run out of town, get out in front and pretend that it's a parade!!!
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  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by stsinner View Post
    I used to record lectures on a micro-cassette recorder...
    I learned how to take notes in outline form. My hand written notes are faster and more complete than any typed notes I've been able to do (even though I'm a touch typist). I can't stand to listen to a lecture more than once so I never tried to record them. :(
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