Thread: Hidden History of Evil

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1 Hidden History of Evil 
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    Claire Berlinski
    A Hidden History of Evil
    Why doesn’t anyone care about the unread Soviet archives?
    In the world’s collective consciousness, the word “Nazi” is synonymous with evil. It is widely understood that the Nazis’ ideology—nationalism, anti-Semitism, the autarkic ethnic state, the Führer principle—led directly to the furnaces of Auschwitz. It is not nearly as well understood that Communism led just as inexorably, everywhere on the globe where it was applied, to starvation, torture, and slave-labor camps. Nor is it widely acknowledged that Communism was responsible for the deaths of some 150 million human beings during the twentieth century. The world remains inexplicably indifferent and uncurious about the deadliest ideology in history.

    For evidence of this indifference, consider the unread Soviet archives. Pavel Stroilov, a Russian exile in London, has on his computer 50,000 unpublished, untranslated, top-secret Kremlin documents, mostly dating from the close of the Cold War. He stole them in 2003 and fled Russia. Within living memory, they would have been worth millions to the CIA; they surely tell a story about Communism and its collapse that the world needs to know. Yet he can’t get anyone to house them in a reputable library, publish them, or fund their translation. In fact, he can’t get anyone to take much interest in them at all.

    Then there’s Soviet dissident Vladimir Bukovsky, who once spent 12 years in the USSR’s prisons, labor camps, and psikhushkas—political psychiatric hospitals—after being convicted of copying anti-Soviet literature. He, too, possesses a massive collection of stolen and smuggled papers from the archives of the Central Committee of the Communist Party, which, as he writes, “contain the beginnings and the ends of all the tragedies of our bloodstained century.” These documents are available online at bukovsky-archives.net, but most are not translated. They are unorganized; there are no summaries; there is no search or index function. “I offer them free of charge to the most influential newspapers and journals in the world, but nobody wants to print them,” Bukovsky writes. “Editors shrug indifferently: So what? Who cares?”
    Interesting read on the Soviet Union and Communism in general. Haven't read through it all yet. Thought I'd post it for all of you
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    15,325
    The reason for the apathy is because the left in this country and the world look at communism as an Utopian idea. They like to compare conservatism and more recently, the Tea Party movement to Nazism yet conveniently forget that their ideology has caused more death and caused more misery and perpetuated more poverty than the Nazi's could have ever dreamed.
    "Inequality is a false notion propagated by those who are made to feel guilty for what they have by those who are jealous for what they don't"-Former MTV Host Kennedy
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Super Moderator Constitutionally Speaking's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4,301
    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    The reason for the apathy is because the left in this country and the world look at communism as an Utopian idea. They like to compare conservatism and more recently, the Tea Party movement to Nazism yet conveniently forget that their ideology has caused more death and caused more misery and perpetuated more poverty than the Nazi's could have ever dreamed.

    They also like to misrepresent the Nazis as right wingers - when they have very little in common with conservatism and nearly EVERYTHING in common with socialism.

    Nazi-ism is a left wing ideology also.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    11,865
    I learned about Soviet atrocities in public schools. We might know more details now that the archives have been opened up since the fall of the USSR, but we knew plenty in the 70s from people who had escaped.


    Do they no longer teach the literature of Solzenytien in colleges? I had to read Cancer Ward for my first college lit class. We had to read 1984 in high school english, and my government teacher had us all watch the cartoon version of Animal Farm. We discussed these things as a class and how they applied to the USSR and China.

    I went to public school, with NEA teachers. Maybe they don't teach that way now, this was in the 70s and 80s. Most of the people who taught me have long since retired.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    I know I watched and read Animal Farm in school, but not 1984 (did that on my own). People knew about the atrocities, but how much was put up to propaganda and how much was believed?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    11,865
    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    I know I watched and read Animal Farm in school, but not 1984 (did that on my own). People knew about the atrocities, but how much was put up to propaganda and how much was believed?


    The class I read Cancer Ward in was taught by a radical, feminist literature professor. She criticized communism for it's mistreatment of women. She pointed out that the only reason the Soviets made women into doctors was because they thought they needed the men for strenuous physical labor and soldiering. She taught that cancer in the book was an analogy for communism, and how it destroyed the very soul of Russia.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    The class I read Cancer Ward in was taught by a radical, feminist literature professor. She criticized communism for it's mistreatment of women. She pointed out that the only reason the Soviets made women into doctors was because they thought they needed the men for strenuous physical labor and soldiering. She taught that cancer in the book was an analogy for communism, and how it destroyed the very soul of Russia.
    interesting how the tone got changed over the last 25 years. I would agree with that it was a cancer that destroyed Russia, but so were most of the Czar's in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, If reform ala Britain or Germany would have come to Russia, the Communism wouldn't have gained a foothold
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    15,325
    Also, look at how the left look at the most bloodthirsty communist leaders. Take Che Guevara. This is a liberal icon. His mug is on t-shirts worn by college students. He is hailed as a revolutionary. A hero. They even made a 2 part movie glorifying him. Time Magazine listed him in their top 100 most influential people in the 20th century. Yet what they all ignore is that the man was a thug and murderer. Ask any Cuban how they feel about Che and more often than not, you won't get a positive answer. Same with Stalin. The man was responsible for over 20 million deaths in the USSR yet people FDR called him "Uncle Joe". They should have listened to Patton on this one. Funny how they call Bush a war criminal yet consider people like Stalin, Castro, and Che saints.
    "Inequality is a false notion propagated by those who are made to feel guilty for what they have by those who are jealous for what they don't"-Former MTV Host Kennedy
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    11,865
    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    interesting how the tone got changed over the last 25 years. I would agree with that it was a cancer that destroyed Russia, but so were most of the Czar's in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, If reform ala Britain or Germany would have come to Russia, the Communism wouldn't have gained a foothold

    Well, it was a literature class, not a history class. We were focusing on a novel written by a man who had escaped from the USSR, and was indicting that system. There's even one exchange in the novel where one character, who had lived through the Nazi's attempt to take Kiev, says "Damn Hitler", and the other says "Hitler's been damned enough" and goes on about the brutalities committed by Stalin.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •