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  1. #1 POLL: Dislike of healthcare law crosses party lines, 1 in 4 Dems want repeal 
    POLL: Dislike of healthcare law crosses party lines, 1 in 4 Dems want repeal
    By Bob Cusack - 10/06/10 05:55 AM ET

    Healthcare reform is hurting the reelection chances of freshman Democrats in the House, according to The Hill/ANGA poll.

    A majority of voters in key battleground districts favor repeal of the legislative overhaul Congress passed this year.

    President Obama predicted in the spring that the new law would become popular as people learned more about it. But the poll shows Republicans strongly oppose it, independents are wary of it and a surprising number of Democrats also want it overturned.

    Republicans have vowed to repeal the law if they take control of Congress, and the findings of Mark Penn, who led Penn Schoen Berland’s polling team, show that healthcare is a major issue for voters this year.

    When asked if they wanted the legislation repealed, 56 percent of voters in the surveyed districts said yes. “Only Democrats were opposed to repeal (23 percent to 64 percent),” Penn said. “Undecided voters wanted the healthcare law repealed by 49 percent to 27 percent.”

    In each district, a majority of those surveyed said they want the controversial law gone.

    Sixty-five percent back repeal in Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick’s (D-Ariz.) district, while only 27 percent oppose such an effort. Kirkpatrick voted for healthcare reform.
    More at the link.

    The Hill
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  2. #2  
    Our widdle friend. Wei Wu Wei's Avatar
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    It's a sad story of failure.

    http://wonkroom.thinkprogress.org/20...hle-interview/


    In his book, Daschle reveals that after the Senate Finance Committee and the White House convinced hospitals to to accept $155 billion in payment reductions over ten years on July 8, the hospitals and Democrats operated under two “working assumptions.” “One was that the Senate would aim for health coverage of at least 94 percent of Americans,” Daschle writes. “The other was that it would contain no public health plan,” which would have reimbursed hospitals at a lower rate than private insurers.
    DASCHLE: I don’t think it was taken off the table completely. It was taken off the table as a result of the understanding that people had with the hospital association, with the insurance (AHIP), and others. I mean I think that part of the whole effort was based on a premise. That premise was, you had to have the stakeholders in the room and at the table. Lessons learned in past efforts is that without the stakeholders’ active support rather than active opposition, it’s almost impossible to get this job done. They wanted to keep those stakeholders in the room and this was the price some thought they had to pay. Now, it’s debatable about whether all of these assertions and promises are accurate, but that was the calculation. I think there is probably a good deal of truth to it. You look at past efforts and the doctors and the hospitals, and the insurance companies all opposed health care reform. This time, in various degrees of enthusiasm, they supported it. And if I had to point out some of the key differences between then and now, it would be the most important examples of the difference.
    Basically yes, they sold out.

    On President Obama not strongly advocating on behalf of progressive priorities like the public option. Could Obama have done more to fight for these ideas?

    DASCHLE: I think so. I think that there were times when we let the ball drop some. But I think the President from the very beginning wanted to take as much of a realistic approach as possible….At the end of the day, he got what he wanted the first comprehensive piece of health legislation ever to be passed, and under very very difficult circumstances….So it’s hard to argue with his logic even though many of us wish we could have seen more.

    The public option wasn't just a perk, it was necessary to curb the costs, they aimed at expanding coverage but now everyone is going to get shitty expensive coverage. Without the public option this health care bill is Pure Corporate Welfare.

    It's just a shame how this entire topic got hijacked by the crazy far-right screaming about death panels and showing pictures of gulags. All sense goes out the window, and we get crap like this.
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    Zoomie djones520's Avatar
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    Or they could have actually tried to have been bipartisan and taken some of the Republican suggestions instead of stonewalling every amendment they offered up.

    It's a proven fact that tort reform works. I don't know why you guys fight it so much.
    In most sports, cold-cocking an opposing player repeatedly in the face with a series of gigantic Slovakian uppercuts would get you a multi-game suspension without pay.

    In hockey, it means you have to sit in the penalty box for five minutes.
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    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wei Wu Wei View Post
    It's just a shame how this entire topic got hijacked by the crazy far-right screaming about death panels and showing pictures of gulags. All sense goes out the window, and we get crap like this.
    The political fight was necessarily brutal. Healthcare was the last mountain to climb for the New Deal/Great Society liberals. After the rise of neoliberalism/Thatcherism from the late-70's, the United States has systematically rejected mid-century liberalism and moved further and further away while at the same time (paradoxically) punishing those who would threaten what that brand of liberalism brought: Social Security, Medicare, Farm Subsidy, ect.

    Neoliberals in the Republican Party knew if health insurance reform took hold, it will not be relinquished by the citizens of the United States no matter how many seats they hold in Congress. The window of opportunity is closing fast.
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  5. #5  
    Our widdle friend. Wei Wu Wei's Avatar
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    The only chance is the idea that moving forward, public options or medicare-for-all would be easier for the people to accept once they see that this health care bill hasn't killed their granny or constructed any concentration camps.

    Once all that paranoiac fear dies down, perhaps something better can be done.

    I just don't have as much hope as I did before, I see us spiraling towards a radical neo-corporatist hellscape where America is just a market demographic and cheap labor, while the wealthy owners of corporations are International citizens just like their corporations are global entities.
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wei Wu Wei View Post
    It's just a shame how this entire topic got hijacked by the crazy far-right screaming about death panels and showing pictures of gulags. All sense goes out the window, and we get crap like this.
    It is a shame lazy punks like you don't get off your ass and go to work earning and paying for health care rather than being a maggot leech. .
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