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  1. #1 Christine O'Donnell was RIGHT 
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separat..._United_States

    Separation of church and state in the United States
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    Contents [hide]
    1 Early history
    1.1 Former state churches in British North America
    1.1.1 Protestant colonies
    1.1.2 Catholic colonies
    1.1.3 Colonies with no established church
    1.1.4 Tabular Summary
    1.2 Colonial support for separation
    1.3 Jefferson, Madison, and the "wall of separation"
    1.4 Patrick Henry, Massachusetts, and Connecticut
    1.5 Test acts
    2 Article 6 of the United States Constitution
    3 Bill of Rights
    4 The 14th Amendment
    5 The Treaty of Tripoli
    6 The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine
    7 Supreme Court since 1947
    8 Interpretive controversies
    8.1 Politics and religion in the United States
    9 See also
    10 References
    11 Bibliography
    12 External links
    12.1 American court battles over separation
    12.2 Other



    The separation of church and state is a legal and political principle derived from various documents of several of the Founders of the United States. The First Amendment to the United States Constitution reads "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof . . ." The modern concept is often credited to the writings of English philosopher John Locke, but the phrase "separation of church and state" is generally traced to an 1802 letter by Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury Baptists, where Jefferson spoke of the combined effect of the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. His purpose in this letter was to assuage the fears of the Danbury, Connecticut Baptists, and so he told them that this wall had been erected to protect them. The metaphor was intended, as The U.S. Supreme Court has currently interpreted it since 1947, to mean that religion and government must stay separate for the benefit of both, including the idea that the government must not impose religion on Americans nor create any law requiring it. It has since been in several opinions handed down by the United States Supreme Court,[1] though the Court has not always fully embraced the principle.[2][3][4][5][6]
     

  2. #2  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    What's scary is that a roomful of law students didn't know it. I can see where the future Democratic judicial nominees will be coming from.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
     

  3. #3 Maybe i am wrong but i think i learned that in 7th grade civics class 
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    of course at my age it is really difficult to remember exactly where and when i learned stuff especially since i have been going to college my entire life
     

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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    I wondered why they were ridiculing her for that statement, when she was factually correct as far as the Constitution goes.

    After all, she should be ridiculed for thinking that creationism is on scientifically equal terms with evolution, and that schools should teach it that way. :D
     

  5. #5  
    I heard the clip today and I thought it was odd. Of course, acquiring a college degree today is more a matter of money and stamina than intellect or knowledge.

    This how we end up with Supreme Court Justices who believe that vagina possession and Spanish oppression bestows superior moral wisdom on judges.
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    What is with this bizarre pride in being ignorant?
     

  7. #7  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I wondered why they were ridiculing her for that statement, when she was factually correct as far as the Constitution goes.

    After all, she should be ridiculed for thinking that creationism is on scientifically equal terms with evolution, and that schools should teach it that way. :D
    Being factually correct doesn't make you politically correct. In fact, it's more often than not the exact opposite.

    Coons has called himself a "bearded Marxist." That means that he thinks that the universe is too complex to have been created by God, but the economy isn't too complex to be run by bureaucrats. You tell me which one is crazier.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    What is with this bizarre pride in being ignorant?
    Beats me. Ask Chris Coons. He couldn't name the rights protected by the First Amendment.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
     

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