Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 77
  1. #21  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    no-man's land in Texas
    Posts
    2,168
    Quote Originally Posted by MstrBlue View Post
    The only problem I would have with executing this... person... is that modern execution methods are too quick.
    He does not deserve humane treatment.
    IMHO, he gave up his humanity when he stole it from a child.
    Slow torture would fit this case, quite nice.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #22  
    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    The Swamps of N. Florida
    Posts
    22,432
    Quote Originally Posted by MstrBlue View Post
    The only problem I would have with executing this... person... is that modern execution methods are too quick.
    He does not deserve humane treatment.
    IMHO, he gave up his humanity when he stole it from a child.

    I don't feel that I am in a position to decide what he does or doesn't deserve. Life in prison yes, death maybe, death by torture... I don't think so. Because he gave up his humanity does that mean that we should give up ours in response? Seems ironic that he can cast aside his humanity and take ours with it in the process. Not only does he have the power to torture and kill children we have now given him the authority to nullify society's ethics, principles and morality.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #23  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FT Belvoir, VA
    Posts
    15,638
    Quote Originally Posted by FlaGator View Post
    I don't feel that I am in a position to decide what he does or doesn't deserve. Life in prison yes, death maybe, death by torture... I don't think so. Because he gave up his humanity does that mean that we should give up ours in response? Seems ironic that he can cast aside his humanity and take ours with it in the process. Not only does he have the power to torture and kill children we have now given him the authority to nullify society's ethics, principles and morality.
    Executing him doesn't nullify our ethics, principles and morality, it validates them. A society that cannot bring itself to condemn monsters has chosen to be overrun by monsters. It's not like there wasn't ample warning:

    Duncan has a long history as a violent sexual predator, and was clinically diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder in 1980, while in prison for raping a younger boy at gunpoint.
    In 2004, Duncan was charged with groping the genitals of a six-year-old boy. He was arrested in April 2005 in Minnesota. The judge granted bail at $15,000. A businessman in Fargo, Joe Crary, gave Duncan money for bail.[1] When freed, Duncan jumped bail.
    The state of Idaho had almost three decades of criminal sexual conduct recorded for Duncan, yet he was granted a low bail and freed to continue his murderous conduct. The judge who granted him bail and the businessman who paid it need to serve part of his sentence. In fact, I propose that this become the law. When a violent felon is freed from jail and commits another crime, the person who freed him, whether a judge, a parole board or simply a third party who paid his bail, should be charged with aiding and abetting. They can still grant bail or parole, but they will be responsible for the consequences.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #24  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by FlaGator View Post
    I don't feel that I am in a position to decide what he does or doesn't deserve. Life in prison yes, death maybe, death by torture... I don't think so. Because he gave up his humanity does that mean that we should give up ours in response? Seems ironic that he can cast aside his humanity and take ours with it in the process. Not only does he have the power to torture and kill children we have now given him the authority to nullify society's ethics, principles and morality.
    Always a difficult argument for me. But my baser instincts frequently take over.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #25  
    Death is the easy way out for this piece of shit.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #26  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    Death is the easy way out for this piece of shit.
    No it isn't.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #27  
    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    The Swamps of N. Florida
    Posts
    22,432
    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Executing him doesn't nullify our ethics, principles and morality, it validates them. A society that cannot bring itself to condemn monsters has chosen to be overrun by monsters. It's not like there wasn't ample warning:



    The state of Idaho had almost three decades of criminal sexual conduct recorded for Duncan, yet he was granted a low bail and freed to continue his murderous conduct. The judge who granted him bail and the businessman who paid it need to serve part of his sentence. In fact, I propose that this become the law. When a violent felon is freed from jail and commits another crime, the person who freed him, whether a judge, a parole board or simply a third party who paid his bail, should be charged with aiding and abetting. They can still grant bail or parole, but they will be responsible for the consequences.
    You misunderstood the point I was making. I was replying to those who suggest that his death should be slow and painful. I wasn't speaking to an execution in general. There is a difference between justice and vengence.

    As for the second half of you post, you seem to be arguing that mercy should be made illegal. If someone has mercy upon another and the person receiving mercy commits another crime you would punish the merciful as well as the criminal. That is a very cold society you are proposing.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #28  
    Power CUer FlaGator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    The Swamps of N. Florida
    Posts
    22,432
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillygirl View Post
    Always a difficult argument for me. But my baser instincts frequently take over.
    I fight hard against my baser instincts myself, but that is the challenge God put before us. In a nutshell Christ said 'here is your nature, now rise above it.'

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #29  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by FlaGator View Post
    I fight hard against my baser instincts myself, but that is the challenge God put before us. In a nutshell Christ said 'here is your nature, now rise above it.'
    I know. I suspect you're better at the challenge than I.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #30  
    Senior Member hampshirebrit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    TehYuk
    Posts
    3,727
    Quote Originally Posted by FlaGator View Post
    I fight hard against my baser instincts myself, but that is the challenge God put before us. In a nutshell Christ said 'here is your nature, now rise above it.'
    Guess I have an advantage over you then, being that I'm an atheist an' all.

    I'd put a bullet in this guy's head in a heartbeat, and wouldn't miss any sleep.

    I used to be against the death penalty, but I've seen far too much nasty shit happening this year, the French students being tortured to death in London, that sicko Austrian guy raping and imprisoning his daughter and having kids by her, and on and on.

    There was an op ed in the UK Times the other day debating the mad or bad thing. The author was basically saying the perpetrators of such crimes can be mad, or bad, but not both.

    Bullshit. They are both mad and bad, in my view. People who commit these crimes are clearly both mad and bad. This Duncan individual is one such person.

    Some crimes are so vile that the DP is the only acceptable sentencing option.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •