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  1. #1 Nearly 1 in 5 Americans had mental illness in 2009 
    Nearly 1 in 5 Americans had mental illness in 2009

    Published: Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 1:13 PM ET

    CHICAGO - More than 45 million Americans, or 20 percent of U.S. adults, had some form of mental illness last year, and 11 million had a serious illness, U.S. government researchers reported on Thursday.

    Young adults aged 18 to 25 had the highest level of mental illness at 30 percent, while those aged 50 and older had the lowest, with 13.7 percent, said the report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration or SAMHSA.

    The rate, slightly higher than last year's 19.5 percent figure, reflected increasing depression, especially among the unemployed, SAMHSA, part of the National Institutes of Health, said.

    "Too many Americans are not getting the help they need and opportunities to prevent and intervene early are being missed," Pamela Hyde, SAMHSA's administrator, said in a statement.

    "The consequences for individuals, families and communities can be devastating. If left untreated mental illnesses can result in disability, substance abuse, suicides, lost productivity, and family discord."

    The 2009 mental health survey hints at the impact of record unemployment rates, which last year hit a 25-year high as struggling employers slashed jobs to cope with a weak economy.

    For many, lost employment meant loss of health insurance, leaving many of the nation's mentally ill unable to get treatment.

    According to the survey, 6.1 million adults last year had a mental health need that went untreated, and 42.5 percent said it was because they could not afford it.
    I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

    CNBC
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  2. #2  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

    CNBC
    The DSM defines wild mood swings as abnormal .They has a canned definition of every human emotion and human behavior that has been predefined by Psychiatry as deviant .Some of their works:

    ...Deviant children grown up
    ...Abused to abuser: Antecedents of socially deviant behaviors
    ...Attainment and Adjustment in Two Geographical Areas: I--The Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorder
    ...Deviant eye tracking in twins discordant for psychosis: A replication
    ...Height, body mass index and mortality: do social factors explain the association?
    ...A behavior rating scale for assessing improvement in behaviorally deviant children: a preliminary investigation
    ...A psychiatric study of deviant eating behaviour among mentally handicapped adults.
    ...Sex roles and societal reactions to mental illness: The labeling of" deviant" deviance

    Psychiatry is all about 'labeling' a condition and not necessarily about curing curing it ! Observing a Problem, Naming It and Fixing It Are Entirely Different Things !
    http://www.sntp.net/naming.htm




    Cyclothymic disorder, also known as cyclothymia, is a relatively mild form of bipolar II disorder characterized by mood swings that may appear to be almost within the normal range of emotions. These mood swings range from mild depression, or dysthymia, to mania of low intensity, or hypomania.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I'm not sure I buy this. I've been depressed when I've been out of work but not mentally ill. Being happy sad, bored, upset, or angry isn't necessarily pathological even if a lot of people want their moods medicalized so they can use drugs instead of experiencing unpleasant emotions.

    CNBC
    I buy it if the misuse of mind altering legal and illegal drugs are included in the study.
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  4. #4  
    It's no coincidence that rates of "mental illness" have shot up ever since family doctors got into the prescribing of mood-altering drugs for emotional issues. It's also not helpful that schools, workplaces, and the media tend to treat commonplace emotional reactions as though they had exotic significance. People just love to believe that they have some kind of ill-defined "issue" that makes them special and sets them apart from the herd.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    It's no coincidence that rates of "mental illness" have shot up ever since family doctors got into the prescribing of mood-altering drugs for emotional issues. It's also not helpful that schools, workplaces, and the media tend to treat commonplace emotional reactions as though they had exotic significance. People just love to believe that they have some kind of ill-defined "issue" that makes them special and sets them apart from the herd.
    Spot on.
    "Our president delivered his State of the Union message to Congress. That is one of the things his contract calls for -- to tell congress the condition of the country. This message, as I say, is to Congress. The rest of the people know the condition of the country, for they live in it, but Congress has no idea what is going on in America, so the president has to tell 'em." ~ Will Rogers
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    Senior Member FBIGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Articulate_Ape View Post
    Spot on.

    You where the 5th person to post.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBIGuy View Post
    You where the 5th person to post.
    God help me! I was the 5th poster.
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    Seems like a large chunk of that 1 and 5 post on du:eek:
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    Quote Originally Posted by lacarnut View Post
    I buy it if the misuse of mind altering legal and illegal drugs are included in the study.


    Substance abuse disorders are listed in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual as psychiatric disorders. Every SA inpatient treatment program that I have ever worked with has each client seen at least for a consult with a psychiatrist.


    There are a lot of things that are now considered psychiatric disorders and treated with medication that weren't considered that way 30 years ago. ADHD, for example. It used to be a diagnosis reserved for kids with really serious behavior issues in school and in the home, due to their lack of ability to focus on the task at hand. Now it's being used to diagnose kids who have a high energy level and basically need more activity in their lives. So it's really easy to do a study that finds that a large number of americans have untreated mental health conditions, when the profession has expanded their diagnostic criteria in order to make more money from and for insurance companies.

    Then there are personality disorders, many of which never are diagnosed or treated. They usually don't require medication, although the people around the clients usually want them medicated because they are annoying. Especially borderlines. But most people with personality disorders generally either think that there is nothing wrong with them, and everyone else is crazy(borderlines, narcississts); or they are deeply ashamed of the things that they think separate them from others and are mortified at the concept of discussing it with someone, or taking a pill to treat it (schizotypals, ODD).
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    Senior Member Madisonian's Avatar
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    Aren't 20% of the population self identified as liberals or progressives.
    Is this number a coincidence?
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