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  1. #1 AC Golden asks customers to grow hops and contribute them to its lager 
    AC Golden asks customers to grow hops and contribute them to its Colorado Native Lager

    By Steve Raabe
    The Denver Post
    Posted: 12/14/2010 01:00:00 AM MST


    The makers of Golden-based Colorado Native Lager have a bitter secret to disclose.

    The craft beer, ostensibly made with all Colorado ingredients, is only 99.89 percent local. The missing fraction is hops.

    Colorado doesn't grow much of the flowery green herb that provides the distinctive bitter taste in beer.

    So the brewer is inviting customers to grow their own in backyard gardens and flower pots, and donate the harvest to AC Golden Brewing Co., a small-batch unit of beer giant MillerCoors.

    The compensation? None, except for a wink and a smile from the brewery that a token of appreciation will be offered, possibly in liquid form.

    Some 373 Facebook fans of Colorado Native took AC Golden up on its invitation to grow hops. They'll receive rhizomes, or rootstalks, for planting in the spring. The vines won't yield much in the first year, but by the second, they'll be sprouting dozens of flowery cones.

    The brewer said it can't estimate how much its customers will produce, although it is likely to be a small percentage of the 6,000 pounds of pelletized hops expected to be needed for the 2011 production of Colorado Native.

    Nonetheless, prospective growers are enthusiastic about their mission.

    "This may be the most ingenious idea MillerCoors has ever had both in marketing and production," said customer Hugh Loomis Jr. "Easiest decision I have ever made. I have only in recent years started a garden at my Lafayette home and was wondering what more fun things I could grow next spring."

    Colorado Native, which launched this year, currently gets 86 percent of its hops from Colorado growers, primarily commercial farms on the Western Slope. Most of the remainder is imported from the big hops-growing states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

    "We're really striving hard to get to 100 percent local ingredients," said Colorado Native brewer Steve Fletcher, who noted that the beer's barley malt, water and yeast are from Colorado.

    "At the very least, if we can help people learn about hops, that's great," he said. "And it's fun for all of us."
    I might try this. I've been looking to plant hops just for the vine but I had no idea what to do with the potential produce. :)

    Read more: AC Golden asks customers to grow hops and contribute them to its Colorado Native Lager - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/business/c...#ixzz186GRm0NJ
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  2. #2  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I might try this. I've been looking to plant hops just for the vine but I had no idea what to do with the potential produce. :)

    Read more: AC Golden asks customers to grow hops and contribute them to its Colorado Native Lager - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/business/c...#ixzz186GRm0NJ
    Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse
    Make your own .Go into competition .I can see it now .

    Snappers Mountain Larger ...We Have a Bit of a Bite in Ours !
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  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    Make your own .Go into competition .I can see it now .

    Snappers Mountain Larger ...We Have a Bit of a Bite in Ours !
    Every other garage out here has a home brewing set-up - no, thanks. I'll confine my chemistry efforts to work. I love a good craft brew but only about 1 in 15 is actually "good". :eek:
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  4. #4  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Every other garage out here has a home brewing set-up - no, thanks. I'll confine my chemistry efforts to work. I love a good craft brew but only about 1 in 15 is actually "good". :eek:
    It's a labor of love for some.You already have good water and that's the biggest hurdle to home brew.Make enough for yourself and a occasional tasting party.You expressed an interest in growing hops as cover for your yard so now use them .With your background and a good Pilsner Recipe, Saaz hops and you can't fail .Soon you will need Lederhosen with the belly flap !You can watch Mr Snaps mellow and grow big red cheeks .
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  5. #5  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    It's a good way to market their product to it's intended customers. Miller probably did some research that showed most of their target customers are into or want to be into gardening.



    The wiccan books I read when I was into that stuff used to say hops was good for upset stomachs.
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  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    It's a good way to market their product to it's intended customers. Miller probably did some research that showed most of their target customers are into or want to be into gardening.

    The wiccan books I read when I was into that stuff used to say hops was good for upset stomachs.
    It's all part of the Alternative Lifestyle: organic gardening, craft beer, "sustainability", local sourcing, and support for community businesses (even if the parent business is a giant, faceless corporation somewhere). This kind of thing is huge out here. If they'd slap a label on the beer featuring an elk and a half-naked Moon goddess, they could sign up three-quarters of the state to grow hops. :D
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  7. #7  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    It's all part of the Alternative Lifestyle: organic gardening, craft beer, "sustainability", local sourcing, and support for community businesses (even if the parent business is a giant, faceless corporation somewhere). This kind of thing is huge out here. If they'd slap a label on the beer featuring an elk and a half-naked Moon goddess, they could sign up three-quarters of the state to grow hops. :D

    Interesting. Here, they are all learning to grow medicinal marijuana.
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  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    Interesting. Here, they are all learning to grow medicinal marijuana.
    All of us already know how to grow weed hydroponically. We're just now learning how to legalize it. :D
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