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  1. #1 Doctors Claim HIV-Positive Man Cured by Stem Cell Transplant 
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    There’s an estimated 33 million people worldwide living with HIV/AIDS, and now doctors believe one of them may have been cured of the virus after receiving a stem cell transplant in 2007, the medical journal Blood reported.

    Timothy Ray Brown, an HIV-positive American living in Germany, had leukemia and was undergoing chemotherapy, when he received a transplant of stem cells from a donor carrying a rare, inherited gene mutation that seems to make carriers virtually immune to HIV infection.

    The transplant appeared to wipe out both diseases, giving hope to doctors, but Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who has been studying HIV/AIDS for almost 30 years, said while this is an interesting proof of concept, it’s absurdly impractical.

    “It’s hard enough to get a good compatible match for a transplant like this,” Fauci told FoxNews.com, “But you also have to find compatible donor that has this genetic defect, and this defect is only found in 1 percent of the Caucasian population and zero percent of the black population. This is very rare.”
    http://www.foxnews.com/health/2010/1...ll-transplant/

    Doesn't exactly seem like it's going to be a mainstream cure anytime soon, but it's good news none the less. Find something that does beat it, then work on how to mass produce.
    In most sports, cold-cocking an opposing player repeatedly in the face with a series of gigantic Slovakian uppercuts would get you a multi-game suspension without pay.

    In hockey, it means you have to sit in the penalty box for five minutes.
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  2. #2 " Report: Scientists, Perhaps.. Finally Cure HIV with Stem Cells?" 
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    The good news, obviously:

    An HIV-positive patient who was treated for leukemia more than three years ago shows no signs of the virus in his system to this day. Doctors can’t be completely sure that trace amounts aren’t lying dormant somewhere in his body, but as far as they’re able to measure, it’s all gone. He’s the first patient on record to be completely cured.


    The bad news: Basically everything else.

    This was no simple matter of a series of injections. We’re talking about a full bone marrow transplant, described by the Health News article linked above as “essentially rebooting the body’s immune system and creating new white blood cells.

    The transplant appeared to wipe out both diseases, giving hope to doctors, but Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who has been studying HIV/AIDS for almost 30 years, said while this is an interesting proof of concept, it’s absurdly impractical.

    “It’s hard enough to get a good compatible match for a transplant like this,” Fauci told FoxNews.com, “But you also have to find compatible donor that has this genetic defect, and this defect is only found in 1 percent of the Caucasian population and zero percent of the black population. This is very rare.”…

    “This is not prime time to me at all,” he said. “This is a very unusual situation that has little practical application for a simple reason.

    This donor not only had to be a good compatible match, but the donor had to have a genetic defect of cells that do not express the receptor that the HIV virus needs to enter the cell.”

    Fauci also pointed to the fact that this transplant process is not only expensive, it’s incredibly painful and complicated, and requires the patient to start a whole new regimen of drugs.

    "The Interesting News:


    Incidentally, it’s not news that some people carry a rare gene that renders them essentially immune from certain fatal diseases.

    a mutation of the gene CCR5 —, just so happens to be the same gene involved in today’s “cure” case. Hmmmm."


    If you’ve ever seen the Black Plague episode of “Secrets of the Dead” — which was the best show evah — you already know that certain European villagers during the Middle Ages inexplicably survived the Black Plague while dozens of people around them were wiped out.

    HIV researchers took samples from the descendants of those survivors and found an unusually high occurrence of a mutation of the gene CCR5 — which, per the Health News article, just so happens to be the same gene involved in today’s “cure” case. Hmmmm.

    http://hotair.com/archives/2010/12/1...th-stem-cells/
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  3. #3  
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    so disingenous of the scientific community and the media.
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  4. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calypso Jones View Post
    so disingenous of the scientific community and the media.
    Don't get your hopes up if you're 'positive' !The cure will in all likelihood kill you before the pox !
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calypso Jones View Post
    so disingenous of the scientific community and the media.
    Actually, in this case, I think the press did a better than usual job of reporting on the circumstances. They kept it mild, and kept the sensationalism to a minimum - at least all the write ups that I've seen.

    Usually its the complete opposite.
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  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by wilbur View Post
    Actually, in this case, I think the press did a better than usual job of reporting on the circumstances. They kept it mild, and kept the sensationalism to a minimum - at least all the write ups that I've seen.

    Usually its the complete opposite.
    I think they really had to this time. This cure is a wildly one-off side-effect of leukemia treatment. The odds of finding compatible donors who also carry the mutation are remote as is living through a transplant. :(
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