Smoked Cheddar Cheese

The smoker temperature has to remain under 90 degrees Fahrenheit for the duration of the smoking process. There are a couple of ways to do this.

One way is to use a large cardboard box as the primary smoke chamber, heating the wood on an electric hotplate. Flexible aluminum clothes dryer vent ducting is used to route the smoke from the box to the smoker or grill. It takes a little bit of figuring out and a little duct tape, but it can be done successfully.

An easier method of cold smoking requires that you have an empty tin can, a new soldering iron and a few smoker pellets. Pellets are placed in the can, the soldering iron is inserted then plugged in. See how it works in the following video presentation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sivMM...layer_embedded

While you're at it live life a wee bit larger.Smoke a little cold smoked salmon and/or steel head trout .
Smoked turkey and Duck breast sliced very thinly with cheery sauce .These smoked fish delicacies are easy to make once you build your cold smoker and planning your menu.

Served with Swedish Limpa rye rounds, sour cream,capers and dill sound's tasty .


I placed about one-half cup of pellets in the can, and it produced smoke for a half hour. There were unburned pellets remaining, so it could have gone longer.

The temperature inside the grill went from 35 degrees Fahrenheit (the outdoor temperature) up to about 60 degrees after one-half hour, which is perfect for cold smoking. I put the tarp over the grill to help keep the smoke in, since it was a windy day.

"For the best taste always go with apple wood !"

The pellets I used tasted like hickory, which also made for a too-intense flavor. I'll look for apple or alder for making the next recipe of smoked cheddar cheese. The cheese is improved by allowing it to set at room temperature for one day, then refrigerating for a couple more. That'll give the smokiness a chance to permeate deep into the cheese.