Thread: " A Plague of Wild Hogs in Texas."

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  1. #1 " A Plague of Wild Hogs in Texas." 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    " A Plague of Wild Hogs in Texas."

    Wild hogs are among the most destructive invasive species in the United States today. Two million to six million of the animals are wreaking havoc in at least 39 states and four Canadian provinces; half are in Texas, where they do some $400 million in damages annually. They tear up recreational areas, occasionally even terrorizing tourists in state and national parks, and squeeze out other wildlife.

    Texas allows hunters to kill wild hogs year-round without limits or capture them alive to take to slaughterhouses to be processed and sold to restaurants as exotic meat. Thousands more are shot from helicopters. The goal is not eradication, which few believe possible, but control.

    The wily hogs seem to thrive in almost any conditions, climate or ecosystem in the state—the Pineywoods of east Texas; the southern and western brush country; the lush, rolling central Hill Country. They are surprisingly intelligent mammals and evade the best efforts to trap or kill them (and those that have been unsuccessfully hunted are even smarter). They have no natural predators, and there are no legal poisons to use against them. Sows begin breeding at 6 to 8 months of age and have two litters of four to eight piglets—a dozen is not unheard of—every 12 to 15 months during a life span of 4 to 8 years. Even porcine populations reduced by 70 percent return to full strength within two or three years.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...-in-Texas.html
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  2. #2  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    TEXAS BOARS ..Simple Tips and Reminders For Cooking Wild Boar.

    A good thing to know and keep in mind before you start preparing Wild Pork is that the meat contains much less fat than Domestic or Production Pork. The meat will be a bit darker and the grain will be tighter.

    This doesn't mean the meat will be tough or taste bad. It just simply means that if not prepared correctly it can be dry compared to store bought pork. This is important to remember when baking, smoking, or grilling whole portions such as legs, ribs and other large portions.

    Another good point to keep in mind is that Wild Pork has different fat than domestic or Production Pork.
    Wild Pork will have "Soft Fat" and Production Pork will have "Hard Fat".

    Soft Fat is not as desirable and should be trimmed away when possible. It is worth noting,, that soft fat is not nearly so unhealthy as hard fat.

    Bigger boar are often criticised and marked as tough and not fit for table fare, well folks,, that is flat out WRONG!! Lots of HIGH CLASS RESERAUNTS consider Wild Boar as a Fine Table Fare and the bigger older boar is preferred. Most every one is familiar with the commercial slaughter house for Wild Hog in Devine TX. They want hogs over 200 pounds and pay more per pound for those hogs. This meat is being served in resteraunts with more stars than what shines in the sky and one Medallion OF Wild Boar cost more than the guns we used to kill'em with.

    If the meat is prepared correctly BEFORE COOKING it will be the best pork of all.

    The first thing to make sure of, is a quick clean kill is made on any game animal. If the animal was chased, gut shot, or died a slow death then then a strong taste could result. There is a solution to this problem though.


    WILD MEAT SOAK and TENDORIZER
    I use this technique for all the wild game animals I take and I highly and frequently recommend this for all wild game.
    # - Skin and Debone or Quarter the animals out and place the meat in a large ice chest with the following mixture.
    # - ICE WATER!! Along with 1/2 - 1 cup of vinegar and a medium or large (18 - 20 oz) size container or real lemon juice.
    # - Soak large portions of meat for 2 0r even 3 days changing the water as needed and keeping the water ICE COLD and all meat covered with the ice water. Soak the meat till it turns white and all blood is leached out.
    **NOTE, if the meat begins to darken or turn blue then you got too much vinegar! The meat is not spoiled!! Change the ice water and reduce or eliminate the vinegar.



    Smoking (slow cooking Quarters or Whole Hogs
    This is the most common and preferred way for preparing wild pork. Usually to be served at friend and family get-to-gethers.
    First of all read the tips and reminders and apply those to those tips in preparing the meat for best results.

    # - Gather your favorite seasonings such as lemons, peppers, onions, potatos, and any other seasonings that suit your taste and get that part taken care of.

    # - Completely wrap the meat so the vapors are locked in as well as possible and the drippings will not escape.

    # - Slow smoke (or bake) at about 275 - 300 degrees turning or rotating as needed to insure even cooking. The time will vary greatly depending on the size.

    # - Whole hogs should cook overnight or all day. Quarters will usually cook in 5 - 6 hours.

    If your wanting to serve the meat in slices you should cook it till you notice that the meat is about ready to fall of the bone and has become very tender. At that point you would unwrap the meat and brown and baste to firm up the meat.

    If you're wanting the meat extremely tender and juicy then it should remain covered and cooked till it falls off the bon
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  3. #3  
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    Post Match BBQ or How to Keep Your Props Happy!

    "As The Gator Says " BARBECUE is Pork !""


    It's fun, it's easy, you'll alaways have clubs wanting to visit and it tastes great! And your Props will be happy. We're talking about roasting a whole pig to serve 50-100 people. Sounds awesome - and it is - and much easier than you might think.

    It's a great way to feed 100 people - not only delicious juicy pork, but the roasted skin becomes a crispy coating of crackling.

    So if you're having a gathering of friends and family, a splendid meal of succulent slowly barbecued roasted pork is "just the ticket!" And you'll not be alone, as an increasing number of Manitobans are being challenged to create this impressive feast.



    BUILDING YOUR OWN HOG COOKER


    Build an open pit - either dig below ground level or make a pit with three tiers of concrete blocks. The Pit should be 1 - 1 1/2 feet deep and 3 - 3 1/2 feet wide. A wire mesh or metal cooking grid may be placed over the pit. Another row of concrete blocks laid around the pit or on top of the other blocks will be very helpful in deflecting wind and conserving heat.

    The pig wrapped in chicken wire is cooked on the cooking grid. The spit-trussed pig may be cooked on the grid or suspended over the pit without the grid. Both methods allow for periodic turning during cooking.

    Remember to start the fire early. Place the charcoal around the edges of the pit. This avoids flare-ups and makes it easier to add more charcoal. The fire should provide moderate heat. (You should be able to hold your hand at cooking height for 4 seconds)

    Cooking times vary depending on the wind, outdoor temperature and the heat of the fire. An open pit will require longer cooking times than an enclosed cooker. To roughly approximate cooking time, estimate on the largest cut on the carcass (the ham). A ham on a 100 lb carcass would weigh 11-12 lbs. Allowing 30-40 minutes per pound, the cooking time would be 6-8 hours.



    PREPARING THE HOG

    Order the hog from a reliable butcher or producer. Smaller animals will have a greater percentage of bone and skin so will yield fewer servings of meat. For a dressed weight hog between 60 and 120 lbs allow 1 1/2 to 2 pounds per serving.

    If the hog is frozen, allow three days for thawing in a cool place. The hog should be kept cold at all times.

    Wash the hog thoroughly in cold running water. Dry completely inside and out.

    Season the cavity with salt and pepper. If desired, add onion, apples, garlic, thyme, or your favorite seasonings to the cavity. Sew closed with heavy string.

    Tie the front legs securely in a forward position near the mouth. Tie the hind legs so the hindfeet nearly touch the forelegs. Prop the mouth open with a block of wood. Lower the eyelids and sew closed. Cure the tail and cover the tail and ears with foil.

    Depending on the size of the hog, it may be trussed on a heavy steel rod or enclosed in chicken wire. Both allow for periodic turning during the cooking period. If you use chicken wire, the hog will have to be placed on a metal cooking grid. The spit-trussed hog may be placed on a grid or suspended over the pit and turned occassionally.



    SERVING

    Let the cooked hog rest for 20 minutes. Remove foil, trussing rods, wood blocks, etc. Carve through the thigh, removing the ham and legs first. Cut into slices. Next, portion the rib section.

    Serve the meat plain or with a variety of dipping sauces. Piping hot sauces will help if the serving meat cools while carving and serving.



    HOW TO BARBECUE A SUCKLING PIG


    For a smaller group, a suckling pig is the ideal choice. The suckling is usually about 15 - 25 lbs. and because of its smaller size, is much easier to handle. Prepare it in the same manner as the whole hog. Sucklings will cook in about 15-20 minutes per pound depending on weather conditions. Because of the small size, the suckling may be cooked on a home BBQ. A 24" barbecue will hold a 15 lb pig. A 30" unit will hold a 25 lb pig. Cook over moderate heat to an internal temperature of 160°F.

    Suckling pigs are usually garnished for display before serving. Remove the block of wood from the mouth and replace with an apple, orange, or carrot. The neck may be wreathed with greens or cranberries. Garnish the platter with greens and fruit as desired.
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  4. #4  
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    Man, a "plague" of delicious animals. Imagine trying to explain that to someone living 200 years ago.
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Madisonian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    " A Plague of Wild Hogs in Texas."

    Wild hogs are among the most destructive invasive species in the United States today. Two million to six million of the animals are wreaking havoc in at least 39 states and four Canadian provinces; half are in Texas, where they do some $400 million in damages annually. They tear up recreational areas, occasionally even terrorizing tourists in state and national parks, and squeeze out other wildlife.

    Texas allows hunters to kill wild hogs year-round without limits or capture them alive to take to slaughterhouses to be processed and sold to restaurants as exotic meat. Thousands more are shot from helicopters. The goal is not eradication, which few believe possible, but control.

    The wily hogs seem to thrive in almost any conditions, climate or ecosystem in the state—the Pineywoods of east Texas; the southern and western brush country; the lush, rolling central Hill Country. They are surprisingly intelligent mammals and evade the best efforts to trap or kill them (and those that have been unsuccessfully hunted are even smarter). They have no natural predators, and there are no legal poisons to use against them. Sows begin breeding at 6 to 8 months of age and have two litters of four to eight piglets—a dozen is not unheard of—every 12 to 15 months during a life span of 4 to 8 years. Even porcine populations reduced by 70 percent return to full strength within two or three years.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...-in-Texas.html
    Obviously this is a plaque in Oklahoma as well.
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  6. #6  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madisonian View Post
    Obviously this is a plaque in Oklahoma as well.
    They are just now showing up in my area. In southern Oklahoma they have been around for years. The females and the young ones can be eaten in the winter but in the summer the parasites make them not too appetizing.
    The boars are so gamy and stink so bad they are worthless.
    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Madisonian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    The boars are so gamy and stink so bad they are worthless.
    If you would shower occasionally...
    Just sayin':D
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  8. #8  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madisonian View Post
    If you would shower occasionally...
    Just sayin':D
    Pig chicks real dig the pheromones!:D
    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
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  9. #9  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Pig chicks real dig the pheromones!:D
    Same with old liberal chicks !The stank draws em like files !
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  10. #10  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    They are just now showing up in my area. In southern Oklahoma they have been around for years. The females and the young ones can be eaten in the winter but in the summer the parasites make them not too appetizing.
    The boars are so gamy and stink so bad they are worthless.
    I don't think I could eat wild pork.
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
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