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  1. #1 This cynical five-a-day myth: Nutrition expert claims we've all been duped 
    This cynical five-a-day myth: Nutrition expert claims we've all been duped

    By Zoe Harcombe
    Last updated at 9:55 AM on 24th January 2011

    With great fanfare, it was reported last week that the current health advice about eating five portions of fruit and vegetables a day is outdated, and that scientists now believe that eight portions is more beneficial.

    While many people grumbled about how on earth they would manage those extra portions, I *allowed myself a wry smile. For more than two years I’ve known that the ‘five-a-day’ mantra we’re all so familiar with is nothing but a fairytale

    Myth: The truth is that fruit and veg are pretty useless nutritionally

    Of course, they are tasty, colourful additions to any meal. But in terms of health and nutrition, fruit and veg have little to offer, and telling us to eat eight portions a day is compounding one of the worst health fallacies in recent history. Surprised? Many people will be, and no doubt some dieticians and nutritionists will reject my arguments. But science backs me up.

    The latest findings come from a European study into diet and health looking at 300,000 people in eight countries.

    It found that people who ate eight or more portions of fresh food a day had a 22 per cent lower chance of dying from heart disease. Yet just 1,636 participants died during the study from heart disease, which is about half of one per cent. Out of that very small proportion, fewer people died from the group that ate more fruit and veg. However, the researchers cautioned that these people may have healthier lifestyles generally. They may be less likely to smoke; they may eat less processed food; they may be more active.

    What we should not do is to make the usual bad science leap from association to causation and say ‘eating more fruit and veg lowers the risk of dying from heart disease’.

    This survey comes not long after another large study, which examined half a million people over eight years, reported that fruit and veg offer no protection against breast, prostate, bowel, lung or any other kind of tumour. Those eating the most fruit and veg showed no difference in cancer risk compared with those *eating the least.

    So how have we been duped for so long? You might assume our five-a-day *fixation is based on firm evidence. But you’d be wrong.

    It started as a marketing campaign dreamt up by around 20 fruit and veg *companies and the U.S. National Cancer Institute at a meeting in California in 1991. And it’s been remarkably successful. People in 25 countries, across three continents, have been urged to eat more greens, and have done so in their millions, believing it was good for them. No doubt it was set up with the best intentions — to improve the health of the nation and reduce the incidence of cancer. But there was no evidence that it was doing us any good at all.

    The fact that our own government has spent £3.3 million over the past four years on the five-a-day message shows how pervasive this belief is. People are convinced that fruit and vegetables are a particularly good source of vitamins and minerals.

    For a long time, I too was a believer. I was a vegetarian for 20 years. It is only after nearly two decades of my own research — I am a Cambridge graduate and currently studying for a PhD in nutrition —that I have changed my views.

    The message that fruit and veg are pretty useless, nutritionally, gradually dawned on me.

    The facts are these. There are 13 vitamins and fruit is good for one of them, vitamin C. Vegetables offer some vitamins — vitamin C and the vegetable form of the fat-soluble vitamins A and vitamin K1 — but your body will be able to absorb these only if you add some fat, such as butter or olive oil. The useful forms of A and K — *retinol and K2 respectively — are found only in animal foods. As for minerals, there are 16 and fruit is good for one of them, potassium, which is not a substance we are often short of, as it is found in water.

    Vegetables can be OK for iron and calcium but the vitamins and minerals in animal foods (meat, fish, eggs and dairy products) beat those in fruit and vegetables hands down. There is far more vitamin A in liver than in an apple, for instance.
    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/fo...#ixzz1C3x538YT

    LOL! I believe it. I probably eat more veggies than most people because I eat very little grain compared to the average person. I don't eat fruit except rarely but I average about 7 - 9 "servings" of veggies a day over the course of a week. Veggies have a lot going for them: they look good, taste good (not the orange ones), the nonstarchy kind are ridiculously low in calories, the fiber is probably good for something, and they are cheap.

    The idea that you have eat so many servings of fruit or veggies for health is just absurd, however. My ancestors lived almost exclusively off fish, game, domestic animals, cheese, and beer. They managed to virtually conquer their much more agriculturally-minded neighbors to the south and east. They couldn't have eaten vegetables and a lot of fruit if they had wanted to since almost no fruit aside from berries grew up there, cabbages and rutabagas were cattle feed, and the grain was needed for beer.

    Remember, you will die without fat and you will die without protein but nobody has ever died from a lack of carbohydrate alone. Now it appears that even vitamin C deficiency is more a product of carbohydrate metabolism than anything else. People who eat large amounts of meats don't seem to require more vitamin C than they get from muscle and organ meats as long those meats are minimally cooked (just the way I like them!).
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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Eating 3-5 servings of fruit and veggies a day may not be essential for life, but it helps keep the mail moving, so it's essential for a comfortable life. I usually eat about 3 a day, counting the orange juice I drink in the morning.
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    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    I think they are confusing the early picked crap that you find in most grocery stores with the fresh fruits and veggies you'll get from local growers, ones that have actually had time to fully develop and pull what they need out of the ground.

    lifestyle plays a large part, but diet plays just as big of a part. want more proof, go look at the Seventh-Day Adventist population and compare their lifestyles and diets to the general public. Adventist have been at the fore front of the health movement for over 150 years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    I think they are confusing the early picked crap that you find in most grocery stores with the fresh fruits and veggies you'll get from local growers, ones that have actually had time to fully develop and pull what they need out of the ground.

    lifestyle plays a large part, but diet plays just as big of a part. want more proof, go look at the Seventh-Day Adventist population and compare their lifestyles and diets to the general public. Adventist have been at the fore front of the health movement for over 150 years.
    Adventists also don't smoke, drink, or sleep around (much, anyway). Veggies have nothing to do with it but avoiding common lifestyle pitfalls like alcoholism and obesity probably do. I'm pro-vegetable but their magical abilities to sustain health have been overstated since Pythagoras.
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    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Adventists also don't smoke, drink, or sleep around (much, anyway). Veggies have nothing to do with it but avoiding common lifestyle pitfalls like alcoholism and obesity probably do. I'm pro-vegetable but their magical abilities to sustain health have been overstated since Pythagoras.
    thats why people/cultures with diets low in meat (any meat, fish included) have some of the longest lived people in the world. :p
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    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    My ancestors lived almost exclusively off fish, game, domestic animals, cheese, and beer.
    Throw in potatoes and I think I may be one of your ancestors.
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  7. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/fo...#ixzz1C3x538YT

    LOL! I believe it. I probably eat more veggies than most people because I eat very little grain compared to the average person. I don't eat fruit except rarely but I average about 7 - 9 "servings" of veggies a day over the course of a week. Veggies have a lot going for them: they look good, taste good (not the orange ones), the nonstarchy kind are ridiculously low in calories, the fiber is probably good for something, and they are cheap.

    The idea that you have eat so many servings of fruit or veggies for health is just absurd, however. My ancestors lived almost exclusively off fish, game, domestic animals, cheese, and beer. They managed to virtually conquer their much more agriculturally-minded neighbors to the south and east. They couldn't have eaten vegetables and a lot of fruit if they had wanted to since almost no fruit aside from berries grew up there, cabbages and rutabagas were cattle feed, and the grain was needed for beer.

    Remember, you will die without fat and you will die without protein but nobody has ever died from a lack of carbohydrate alone. Now it appears that even vitamin C deficiency is more a product of carbohydrate metabolism than anything else. People who eat large amounts of meats don't seem to require more vitamin C than they get from muscle and organ meats as long those meats are minimally cooked (just the way I like them!).
    word sista.

    I bulk on carbs and lean out on fat and protien.

    I eat bacon and eggs and my cholesteral goes down. I eat cerreal and fat free milk and it goes up....
    Last edited by Zafod; 01-25-2011 at 02:18 PM.
    One does not greet death when he knocks at your door.

    Nay you repeatedly punch him in the throat as he slowly drags you away.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    thats why people/cultures with diets low in meat (any meat, fish included) have some of the longest lived people in the world. :p
    source?
    One does not greet death when he knocks at your door.

    Nay you repeatedly punch him in the throat as he slowly drags you away.
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  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    Throw in potatoes and I think I may be one of your ancestors.
    My ancestors raped the peoples who adopted the potato. So, either way. you're speculation is making my head explode. :p
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  10. #10  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zafod View Post
    source?
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Why-D...th-53411.shtml
    There are 457 persons on Okinawa aged 100 or over, an average of 35 for each 100,000 inhabitants. It is the highest in the world.

    If Japanese people live longer than any other nation, the Okinawa inhabitants reach ages that take by surprise even the other Japaneses: an average of 86 for women and 78 for men.

    But the real shocking factor is not that Okinawa people reach these ages, but that they get old in a

    much better state. The statistics reveal a significantly lower risk of heart attack and stroke, cancer, osteoporosis, Alzheimer. And some Okinawans on their 90's ensure and reinsure that they still have sex life (without Viagra). Even if scientists insist that this has not been tested scientifically.

    The traditional diet of Okinawa consists in portions made of a bowl of cooked food and a fruit. Okinawans eat daily seven portions of vegetables and fruits, seven of cereals and two of soy products. They take various portions of fish weekly and very sporadically meat and dairy products. Overall, their diet is low in calories and contains a lot of vegetables.
    http://www.healthyeatingclub.org/inf.../Longevity.htm
    Between 1988 and 1991 data were collected on diet, health and lifetsyle on about 800 people aged 70 and over from countries/cultures experiencing longevity: Swedes, Greeks, Australians (Greeks and Anglo-Celts) and Japanese. They were followed up for 5-7 years to determine survival.

    Much to the surprise of the investigators, the elderly Greeks in Australia had the lowest risk of death (even though they had the highest rates of obesity and other CVD risk factors), followed by the slimmer and more athletic elderly Swedes, Japanese, Anglo-Australians and the elderly Greeks in Greece had the highest risk of death.

    The statistical analyses containing ten potential predictors of survival (mediterranean diet score, memory score, general health score, activities of daily living (ADL) score, exercise score,social activity score, social networks scores, wellbeing, smoking, gender) revealed that diet was one of the most important variables for survival.

    Diet was more important than most of the variables for survival, except for smoking, being male and having a poor memory. Elderly people in this study who had a more 'mediterranean style' eating pattern i.e high intakes of plant foods (cereals, legumes, vegetables, fruits and nuts), low intakes of animal foods (meat, milk and dairy products) and moderate fish and alcohol consumption had a reduced risk of death by more than 40%
    http://www.naturalnews.com/022599.html
    (NaturalNews) A study of Seventh Day Adventists, published in 2000, showed that several of their lifestyle factors increase longevity and quality of health. The study was conducted among 34,192 self-identified California Adventists. Subjects were asked to complete questionnaires that pinpointed demographics, medical history, diet, physical activity, and a few psycho-social variables. Subjects were evaluated for 12 years in regard to deaths and hospitalizations.

    Comparisons were made among the subjects according to several lifestyle choices, and secondly, the Adventist statistics as a whole were compared to the vital statistics of non-Hispanic Californians in general. It was found that there was more variation in longevity between vegetarian Adventists and non-vegetarian Adventists than between Adventists as a whole and non-Adventists. It appears that some of the factors studied are those which can add years to one's life if adopted.

    The factors evaluated for the study were: vegetarianism, body mass index, past smoking (there were no current smokers), exercise, Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) in women, and eating of nuts. A vegetarian diet was defined as meat consumption, never or less than once per month; and semi-vegetarian as eating of meats more often than vegetarians, but less than once per week. All others are non-vegetarians. Few Adventist vegetarians are vegan. Meat was identified as beef (hamburger, steak, other beef, or veal), pork, poultry, and fish. Nut consumption was included in these analyses because of previously published evidence showing protective associations between nut consumption and deaths due to coronary heart disease. Unfortunately, the article did not define what was considered a nut for the purposes of this study.

    Generally it was found that among the non-Hispanic Californian population, those identified as Seventh Day Adventists lived longer, on the average of 7.3 extra years for men, and 4.42 more years for women.
    Among the Adventist population itself, it was found that high physical activity, frequent consumption of nuts, vegetarian status, and medium body mass index each result in an approximate 1.5- to 2.5-years gain in life expectancy. Hypertension accounts for the loss of 4.2 and 3.2 years and diabetes for the loss of 4.6 and 8.6 years in men and women, respectively.
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