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  1. #1 Twitter blocked in Egypt as protests turn violent 
    Twitter blocked in Egypt as protests turn violent (Video)
    By Melissa Bell


    Anti-government protesters gather at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

    Protests have brought Cairo to a standstill this week as thousands have poured into the streets, shouting "Down with Mubarak" and clashing with riot police. The demonstrators are calling for an end to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's nearly 30 years in power and were inspired by the Tunisian uprising that ousted President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali on Jan. 14.

    The protests were organized on Facebook and Twitter, though reports are now surfacing that Twitter is being blocked in Egypt.

    Vodafone Egypt seems to confirm the news that Twitter has been blocked.

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  2. #2  
    The big Cheese
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    and it starts....
    One does not greet death when he knocks at your door.

    Nay you repeatedly punch him in the throat as he slowly drags you away.
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    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Scary, and certainly dangerous, especially since the largest, best-organized and most dangerous anti-government faction is the Muslim Brotherhood, but this doesn't mean what it does in Tunisia. From http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/pos...utions_spread:

    Simply put, most Arab regimes are quick studies when it comes to their own survival, and quickly adapt when challenged. Unlike tightly controlled Tunisia, states such as Egypt and Jordan have been grappling with protests movements for going on a decade now and have an all-too-rich experience with how to repress, divide, and defeat the new protest movements. Yesterday's massive demonstrations in Cairo may have shocked everyone -- outsiders, Egypt's government, even the protestors -- but in a country which has been rocked by pro-Palestine and anti-Iraq war protests, the Kefaya movement, the April 6 movement, the judges and lawyers protests, and massive labor unrest, the difference is in scale, not type
    So we should be rooting for the least bad guys, which, in this case, is the government. If Mubarak falls, it is very likely that the new regime will be a radical Islamist one, which will be very very very bad for everyone. Such a regime would be happy to take Gaza back from Israel, as they are already in league with Hamas, and would also be inclined to work with Iraq to attack both Israel and the US. Expect massive arms smuggling to occur, not to mention deployment of Iranian nukes on Egyptian soil. In fact, the only plus side that I can see to that scenario is my job security.
    --Odysseus
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    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Expect massive arms smuggling to occur, not to mention deployment of Iranian nukes on Egyptian soil.
    Risky. The Shia Persians might get their nukes back from the Sunni Arabs the hard way.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    Risky. The Shia Persians might get their nukes back from the Sunni Arabs the hard way.
    Only after the Israeli boogey man has been dealt with. And were that to happen, we'd become a much bigger "boogey man" for them to deal with.
    In most sports, cold-cocking an opposing player repeatedly in the face with a series of gigantic Slovakian uppercuts would get you a multi-game suspension without pay.

    In hockey, it means you have to sit in the penalty box for five minutes.
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    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djones520 View Post
    Only after the Israeli boogey man has been dealt with.
    Given the choice (as long as no one was watching), I would bet American money the Saudis, Egyptians, hell, every Sunni Arab power center with the exception of Syria (and I'm not sure about them) would rather see Iran militarily brutalized than Israel.
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    Zoomie djones520's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arroyo_Doble View Post
    Given the choice (as long as no one was watching), I would bet American money the Saudis, Egyptians, hell, every Sunni Arab power center with the exception of Syria (and I'm not sure about them) would rather see Iran militarily brutalized than Israel.
    The powers that be maybe.

    But when you take into account that those powers have spent years channelling thier populations anger at Israel to mask their own short comings, try explaining to them why you attacked a fellow Islamic nation and not the Zionist devil that they have created?
    In most sports, cold-cocking an opposing player repeatedly in the face with a series of gigantic Slovakian uppercuts would get you a multi-game suspension without pay.

    In hockey, it means you have to sit in the penalty box for five minutes.
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    I'd like to see them succeed, but I fear a repeat of Iran. :(
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    Senior Member Dan D. Doty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zafod View Post
    and it starts....
    You got that right.

    No one is going to like how this turns out ... expect for the Crazies.
    CU's Paranormal Expert.


    Keep your powder dry, your sword sharp and your wits intact.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    Scary, and certainly dangerous, especially since the largest, best-organized and most dangerous anti-government faction is the Muslim Brotherhood, but this doesn't mean what it does in Tunisia. From http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/pos...utions_spread:



    So we should be rooting for the least bad guys, which, in this case, is the government. If Mubarak falls, it is very likely that the new regime will be a radical Islamist one, which will be very very very bad for everyone. Such a regime would be happy to take Gaza back from Israel, as they are already in league with Hamas, and would also be inclined to work with Iraq to attack both Israel and the US. Expect massive arms smuggling to occur, not to mention deployment of Iranian nukes on Egyptian soil. In fact, the only plus side that I can see to that scenario is my job security.
    I don't see what's wrong with the idea of Eygpt getting Gaza back in light of the fact that Israel doesn't want the people already living there. I do see your point though. The people taking over may not be much better than the current dictatorship.
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