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  1. #1 Arab world shaken by power of Twitter and Facebook 
    Arab world shaken by power of Twitter and Facebook

    By John Timpane

    Inquirer Staff Writer
    When dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali fled Tunisia on Jan. 14, it was the first time in history that Twitter, Facebook, and other social media had helped bring down a government.

    With Egypt now in its third day of Facebook-organized political flash mobs, it may not be the last.

    Recent uprisings midwived by Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and the cable news network Al-Jazeera might not be a "Twitter revolution." But the Middle East has been shaken, and social media have done some of the shaking.

    "In the Arab world, this has never happened before," says John Entelis, director of Middle Eastern studies at Fordham University. "A dictator has been deposed by the people. That is an extraordinary first step, even if nothing else comes of it. And believe me, the whole Arab world is watching."

    Mustapha Tlili, director of New York University's Center for Dialogues and himself Tunisian, says: "For the first time, we became a world moral community, thanks to Twitter."

    Tlili says dictators in the region's other countries can block social media, but not forever, "so they must deal with the way social media make it easy to flout authority, organize opposition, and appeal to the moral conscience of the world."

    In Tunisia, nothing happened overnight. Demonstrations had been widespread since December on issues including unemployment, economic conditions, and official corruption.

    On Dec. 17, in Sidi Bouzid, deep in the interior, Mohamed Bouazizi set himself aflame in front of a government building, in protest after police confiscated his produce stand.

    Horrible images of his act circulated lightning-fast on the Internet. Protests followed. The world witnessed what Neil Postman wrote in his prescient 1985 book, Amusing Ourselves to Death: "Introduce speed-of-light transmission of images and you make a cultural revolution."

    "Thanks to Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook, images of those first protests went around the world instantly, and everyone knew about it," says Tlili. "Even 20 years ago, you could have had those uprisings in the interior and few would have known."

    Bouazizi's image went out in thousands of tweets, e-mails, and Facebook posts. He became an image of resistance. About a dozen copycat self-immolations occurred in neighboring countries. A purported last note to his mother appeared on a Facebook page in Bouazizi's name: "I will be traveling my mom, forgive me, Reproach is not helpful, i am lost in my way it is not in my hand, for give me if disobeyed words of my mom, blame our times and do not blame me, i am going and not coming back . . ."

    Al-Jazeera - drawing indignant criticism from the regime - covered the growing protests. "Al-Jazeera has been very in-your-face covering the uprisings," Entelis says.

    David Nassar, chief executive officer of Hotspot Digital and a Middle East expert, says, "Here as elsewhere, cable news has been a breath of fresh air, a powerful unifying force in the Arab world."

    One thing about information: Once it's out, you can't put it back. As Richard Goedkoop, associate professor of communication at La Salle University, puts it, "The sheer multiplicity of venues and sources makes it impossible for would-be dictators to get the genie back in the bottle. And once info is out at all, it's easily, infinitely copiable."

    Protests punctuated Bouazizi's two weeks in the hospital. He died Jan. 5, and the cycle repeated: Protesters texted and tweeted info and images, organized flash-demonstrations, and warned of police activity. Al-Jazeera kept the camera steady, covering Bouazizi's death and funeral, the unrest that followed, and the often violent government response. More repression, more protest, more tweets, more coverage. Within nine days, Ben Ali was gone.
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  2. #2  
    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if this is good or bad, other than the part about no government being able to block it out for very long, which is good.


    I thought that that smart phones and internet sites were great during the uprising in Iran, but it didn't lead to an actual overthrow of the regime. I'm sure plenty of people were tortured and killed afterward for sending images of the uprising there around the world.
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  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    I'm not sure if this is good or bad, other than the part about no government being able to block it out for very long, which is good.


    I thought that that smart phones and internet sites were great during the uprising in Iran, but it didn't lead to an actual overthrow of the regime. I'm sure plenty of people were tortured and killed afterward for sending images of the uprising there around the world.
    It's good. The Internet is a destabilizing influence. Many of these people are just now learning how the rest of the world lives and their lives aren't that great in comparison. When they can exchange information with other people, they necessarily have less faith in the edicts issued by government officials and religious lackeys.

    Revolutions don't have to follow the American pattern - not in this day and age. It's more of a relentless erosion of ignorance and frozen culture than it is an explosion of Liberty. It will eventually lead to the same result, though. ;)
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