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  1. #1 Democratic senators ditch 2012 runs 
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    By JONATHAN ALLEN & MANU RAJU | 3/3/11 8:36 PM EST Updated: 3/5/11 11:33 AM EST

    Five senators from the Democratic side of the aisle have already decided to hang ’em up after this term. Each has his own reasons, but it mostly boils down to this: For some senators, a job in the “most exclusive club” is not worth the hassle anymore.

    “It’s about campaigns,” Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), a retiring member of the Democratic Caucus, told POLITICO. “It’s about both the unremitting — that’s a bad word to use — about the constant pressure to raise money and travel all over the country doing that and the nastiness of the campaign. ... I have no second thoughts about it.”

    Lieberman, who lost a 2006 Democratic primary only to win in the general election as an independent, faced a tough path to win reelection. And he’s 69. Democrats could well lose the Senate in 2012 anyway, meaning he would lose his chairmanship of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

    “At least I’m not having to travel around the country raising money and being involved in a political back-and-forth of a campaign,” adds North Dakota Sen. Kent Conrad, who says he’d rather work to curtail the deficit than face another tough run in a conservative state.

    Democratic officials say the early retirement announcements reflect a successful push by Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray of Washington to guard against devastating last-minute surprises by pressing senators to decide sooner rather than later whether they’ll run.

    The retirements of longtime veterans on the Democratic side, such as Lieberman, Conrad, Daniel Akaka of Hawaii and Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico, are a sign, too, of the rapidly changing membership of the aging body. 2010 ushered in 16 new senators, one of the biggest classes in a generation, allowing a slew of newer members to quickly grab prized committee assignments and move up the ladder in a body long dominated by senior members.

    Republicans see the playing field expanding with each Democrat who bails on the Senate.

    “It certainly suggests that the pathway to get to 51 is achievable,” Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) said Thursday. “I think depending on what happens in the next couple of years and depending on what retirements we have, a lot of these Democrat seats that are opening up, I think there are some opportunities for us — and I hope if we can get the right candidates in the races and resource them, we’ll have a shot at changing the equation.”

    Murray may have the toughest political job in Washington: Twenty-three Democratic-held seats are on the ballot next year — compared with 10 for Republicans — and a net gain of just four seats would put the GOP in charge. Throw in a presidential election that promises to make already scarce funds even harder to come by, and Murray needs a bit of a miracle to hold the Senate.

    CONTINUED
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    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    of course running all over the country is the only way these liberal idiots can raise enough money. Personally I feel that Senators/Reps should only be able to raise money and campaign within their own states/districts. Make them answer to their constituents and not pander to a national audience
     

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    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    of course running all over the country is the only way these liberal idiots can raise enough money. Personally I feel that Senators/Reps should only be able to raise money and campaign within their own states/districts. Make them answer to their constituents and not pander to a national audience
    Now that we are going to start bailing out states with taxpayer money from all the states maybe I do have an interest in who gets elected in California or New York etc....
    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
     

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    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Now that we are going to start bailing out states with taxpayer money from all the states maybe I do have an interest in who gets elected in California or New York etc....
    especially with other senators so willing to sell out their "home" states for the sake of their own careers.
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    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    Now that we are going to start bailing out states with taxpayer money from all the states maybe I do have an interest in who gets elected in California or New York etc....
    yeah, but would we be in this hole if these ass hats were actually held responsible for actions by their actual constituents and not pandering to the rest of the country just to get their asses reelected in their own states
     

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    Destroyer of Worlds Apocalypse's Avatar
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    I would expect to see a few more. But while we look at gaining the Senate, we must also watch the House and make sure we don't lose it. Else we face Pelosi back in control.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apocalypse View Post
    I would expect to see a few more. But while we look at gaining the Senate, we must also watch the House and make sure we don't lose it. Else we face Pelosi back in control.
    which is why redistricting is so very important.
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  8. #8  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    of course running all over the country is the only way these liberal idiots can raise enough money. Personally I feel that Senators/Reps should only be able to raise money and campaign within their own states/districts. Make them answer to their constituents and not pander to a national audience
    That's a reform that I've been in favor of for a long time. What's interesting is the mix of retiring senators. Although the likelihood of a Republican takeover of the Senate won't affect most of their individual reelection chances, the fact is that they would lose the committee chairmanships and the perks that come with them, and being in the minority isn't much fun when you're used to being the top dog. My take:

    Joe Lieberman (I-CT.): The article pretty much nailed it. He's not in danger of losing his seat, despite being an independent, but if the Dems lose the senate, he would lose his chairmanship of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Better to kick back and enjoy some time at home.

    Kent Conrad (D-ND): North Dakota is trending Republican and is likely to continue to do so. Conrad's reelection odds are iffy, at best.

    Daniel Akaka (D-HI): Akaka might be vulnerable to a run by the new Republican stars in the state (the former governor, for example), but he's also getting too old for a tough fight. Even if the general election was going to be a walk, there is a very good chance of a vicious primary, as the younger party members are getting impatient with the long wait for a senate seat and are preparing to challenge the old bulls. This is a logical move for him.

    Jeff Bingaman (D-NM): An extremely competitive seat, and one which is unlikely to stay Democratic. Getting while the getting is good.

    James Webb (D-VA): The most vulnerable of the five. Virginia went overwhelmingly Republican in the last election cycle, as well as the gubernatorial race the year before. Webb can expect an extremely hard fight, with the entire state mobilized against him. Better to try to salvage his dignity and find another way to make a living.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
     

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    Senior Member Constitutionally Speaking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odysseus View Post
    That's a reform that I've been in favor of for a long time. What's interesting is the mix of retiring senators. Although the likelihood of a Republican takeover of the Senate won't affect most of their individual reelection chances, the fact is that they would lose the committee chairmanships and the perks that come with them, and being in the minority isn't much fun when you're used to being the top dog. My take:

    Joe Lieberman (I-CT.): The article pretty much nailed it. He's not in danger of losing his seat, despite being an independent, but if the Dems lose the senate, he would lose his chairmanship of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Better to kick back and enjoy some time at home.

    Kent Conrad (D-ND): North Dakota is trending Republican and is likely to continue to do so. Conrad's reelection odds are iffy, at best.

    Daniel Akaka (D-HI): Akaka might be vulnerable to a run by the new Republican stars in the state (the former governor, for example), but he's also getting too old for a tough fight. Even if the general election was going to be a walk, there is a very good chance of a vicious primary, as the younger party members are getting impatient with the long wait for a senate seat and are preparing to challenge the old bulls. This is a logical move for him.

    Jeff Bingaman (D-NM): An extremely competitive seat, and one which is unlikely to stay Democratic. Getting while the getting is good.

    James Webb (D-VA): The most vulnerable of the five. Virginia went overwhelmingly Republican in the last election cycle, as well as the gubernatorial race the year before. Webb can expect an extremely hard fight, with the entire state mobilized against him. Better to try to salvage his dignity and find another way to make a living.
    I heard Lieberman and Webb were not running again.
    I long for the days when our President actually liked our country.
     

  10. #10  
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Constitutionally Speaking View Post
    I heard Lieberman and Webb were not running again.
    They aren't. It was in the article. My point was that their motives were different. Lieberman would have been reelected, but didn't want to be in the miinority and lose his committee chairmanship, while Webb was looking at defeat. I suspect that Ben Nelson and a few others will also be making the decision to spend time with their families, or whatever the current euphemism is for running away like a scalded dog. The really interesting thing will be to see if Democrats in deeply blue states decide not to run. Akaka is one, of course, but if others who have solid reelection hopes decide to butt out, it will be a solid indicator that they expect to be in the minority and don't want to have to deal with it.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
     

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