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  1. #1 Jalapeno Pepper Jelly 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Jalapeno Pepper Jelly

    Always wear kitchen gloves when handling hot peppers .

    You haven't lived until you've taken a 'whiz' while your hands are soaked with Jalapeno pepper juice .:eek:

    Tart green apples have more pectin in them than sweet apples, so use tart green apples for this recipe, earlier in the season the better. This is especially true if you are not also using cranberries, as cranberries have their own natural pectin as well.

    Ingredients
    4 lbs of tart apples (e.g. Granny Smith), unpeeled, chopped into big pieces, including the cores
    6 jalapeño chili peppers, sliced in half lengthwise, the seeds and ribs removed from 3 of them (for mildly hot jelly. If you want a hotter jelly leave the seeds and ribs in all of them.)
    1 green bell pepper (or red if you want the color), seeds and ribs removed, chopped
    1 cup cranberries... helps with color and with setting)
    3 cups water
    3 cups white vinegar
    3 1/2 cups sugar (7/8 cup for each cup of juice)

    One 6-quart pan (Stainless steel or copper with stainless steel)
    A candy thermometer
    A large fine mesh sieve (or several layers of cheesecloth, or a muslin cloth jelly bag)
    4-5 half-pint canning jars

    Combine the apple pieces, apple cores (needed for their pectin content), jalapenos, bell pepper, cranberries (if using), water and vinegar in a large pot. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to medium-low, simmering for about 20 minutes, or until the apples, cranberries, and peppers are soft. Stir occasionally to make sure nothing is sticking to the bottom of the pan where it might burn. Use a potato masher to mash up the apple pieces to the consistency of slightly runny apple sauce. If the mash is too thick, add more water.

    Spoon the mash into a fine mesh sieve, muslin cloth, or a couple layers of cheesecloth, suspended over a large bowl. Leave to strain for several hours (even overnight). If you want a clear jelly, do not squeeze or force through the mesh. Just let it drip. If you want a fuller flavor jelly and don't mind that the result won't be clear, you can force some of the pulp through the mesh. If your pulp is too thick, and nothing is coming out, you can add an extra 1/2 cup or cup of water to it. You want to end up with about 4 cups of juice.

    Measure the juice, then pour into a large, wide, thick-bottomed pot. Add the sugar (7/8 a cup for each cup of juice). Heat gently, stirring to make sure the sugar gets dissolved and doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan and burn.

    Bring to a boil. Cook for 10-15 minutes, using a spoon to skim off the surface scum. Continue to boil until a candy thermometer shows that the temperature has reached 220-222°F (8-10°F above the boiling point at your altitude). Additional time needed for cooking can be anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour or longer, depending on the amount of water, sugar, and apple pectin in the mix.

    Candy thermometers aren't always the most reliable indicators of whether or not a jelly is done. Another way to test is put a half teaspoonful of the jelly on a chilled (in the freezer) plate. Allow the jelly to cool a few seconds, then push it with your fingertip. If it wrinkles up, it's ready.

    Pour jelly into sterilized jars* to within 1/4" from the top and seal.
    Makes approx. 4 half-pint jars.
    Serve with cream cheese on crackers.
    *There are several ways to sterilize your jars for canning. You can run them through a short cycle on your dishwasher. You can place them in a large pot (12 quart) of water on top of a steaming rack (so they don't touch the bottom of the pan), and bring the water to a boil for 10 minutes. Or you can rinse out the jars, dry them, and place them, without lids, in a 200°F oven for 10 minutes.

    Note that jalapeno jelly can be pretty "hot" if you have included a lot of the seeds in your cooking. The fat molecules in the cream cheese absorb the hot capsaicin of the jalapenos, reducing the heat, but leaving the flavor of the chiles. This is also why sour cream tastes so good with spicy Mexican food.
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  2. #2  
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    oooh. sounds yummy. I knew Sourcream etc had a cooling effect but i never knew why. Thanks for the info.
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  3. #3  
    Not doing this one. A coworker of mine always gave it as a Christmas present. It's pretty horrifying to get this stuff on toast when you aren't expecting it in the morning.

    I always ended up using this jelly as part of a pork marinade. That worked.

    Have you ever had jalapeno peanut brittle? If you haven't - don't. :(
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  4. #4  
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    I like hot stuff.

    I do not like crab jelly.
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  5. #5  
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    I love this stuff with cream cheese. I had no idea apples are used to make it.
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  6. #6  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillygirl View Post
    I love this stuff with cream cheese. I had no idea apples are used to make it.
    I had some habanero jelly that was good too, I never thought I would like pepper jelly but it's good.
    The difference between pigs and people is that when they tell you you're cured it isn't a good thing.
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  7. #7  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Not doing this one. A coworker of mine always gave it as a Christmas present. It's pretty horrifying to get this stuff on toast when you aren't expecting it in the morning.

    I always ended up using this jelly as part of a pork marinade. That worked.

    Have you ever had jalapeno peanut brittle? If you haven't - don't. :(
    You'd never make it in Mexico .Even real Texmex is hotter than plain old cool jalapenos jelly.Try some real Chilli made with Capsicum Chinense for heat.Jalapenos run 2500 ~8000,Orange Habanero's run 15,000~350,000 Scoville's .

    Take the seeds and membrane out of half of the peppers when you make the jelly .You still get the flavor but not all of the heat ....For a tasty pork marinade you want Mangio da Sola: Chipotle Chilies in Adobo Sauce .
    .
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  8. #8  
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    Thanks for the recipe. This one looks simple enough for me to make (I've had a few canning disasters in the past).

    I do love this stuff. I at first recoiled at the idea, but I've found that it is wonderfully useful in places where you never would think it would be.


    Tasty snack for parties: soften up a brick of cream cheese, then pour pepper jelly over it. Serve with crackers. The cream cheese nicely cools the heat of the pepper jelly, making a very tasty (and somewhat addictive!) spread.
    Olde-style, states' rights conservative. Ask if this concept confuses you.
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  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    You'd never make it in Mexico .Even real Texmex is hotter than plain old cool jalapenos jelly.Try some real Chilli made with Capsicum Chinense for heat.Jalapenos run 2500 ~8000,Orange Habanero's run 15,000~350,000 Scoville's .

    Take the seeds and membrane out of half of the peppers when you make the jelly .You still get the flavor but not all of the heat ....For a tasty pork marinade you want Mangio da Sola: Chipotle Chilies in Adobo Sauce .
    .
    Please do not school me on peppers. I grow Bird's Eye peppers, Habaneros, and many others every summer. I make sauces with them, pickles, dried pepper flakes, and other stuff. A little heat is fine in the right recipe but I sure don't need it something like jelly, candy, or ice cream.

    It's perfectly fine to confine hot peppers to savory dishes based on bland ingredients. We do not yet have a Federal regulation requiring hot ingredients in otherwise innocuous foods. :p
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  10. #10  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Please do not school me on peppers. I grow Bird's Eye peppers, Habaneros, and many others every summer. I make sauces with them, pickles, dried pepper flakes, and other stuff. A little heat is fine in the right recipe but I sure don't need it something like jelly, candy, or ice cream.

    It's perfectly fine to confine hot peppers to savory dishes based on bland ingredients. We do not yet have a Federal regulation requiring hot ingredients in otherwise innocuous foods. :p
    Sorry,I was responding to your comments not schooling you !I'm new to some of these concoctions and experiment to find what I like.. My, my are you getting a mite Touchie these days.
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