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  1. #1 Ronald Reagan on FDR 
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    http://www.firstprinciplesjournal.co...cle=1082&loc=r

    Reagan's quotes are in bold. Mind you, this is Reagan AFTER leaving the Democratic Party, and AFTER becoming President.

    "As president, Reagan often mentioned his admiration for FDR’s spirit of leadership. On a trip back to his alma mater, Eureka College, in 1984, he reminded his listeners what it was like to experience the Great Depression, and how the Fireside Chats had been so reassuring. “All of us who lived through those years,” he instructed them, “remember the drabness the depression brought. But we remember, too, how people pulled together, that sense of community and shared values, that belief in American enterprise and democracy that saw us through. It was that engrained American optimism, that sense of hope Franklin Roosevelt so brilliantly summoned and mobilized.” In his view, FDR was instrumental in reviving an inherent American optimism that was endangered by the economic crisis.

    Twice he spoke at events honoring Roosevelt. The first was in 1982. He had visited the FDR exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution, then returned to the White House for a luncheon that included the Roosevelt family. Naturally, when speaking in front of someone’s family, one avoids comments critical of a loved one. The speech was instead a tribute to FDR’s leadership. Reagan called him “one of history’s truly monumental figures,” “an American giant, a leader who shaped, inspired, and led our people through perilous times,” one who could “reach out to men and women of diverse races and backgrounds and inspire them with new hope and new confidence in war and peace.”

    He recalled the first time he had seen FDR, a moment he still remembered vividly—a campaign parade in Des Moines, Iowa, in 193:

    "What a wave of affection and pride swept through that crowd as he passed by in an open car … a familiar smile on his lips, jaunty and confident, drawing from us reservoirs of confidence and enthusiasm some of us had forgotten we had during those hard years. Maybe that was FDR's greatest gift to us. He really did convince us that the only thing we had to fear was fear itself."

    Reagan acknowledged that FDR had his critics, but on this occasion, he chose rather to emphasize how Roosevelt viewed all Americans as part of one social class only, a class called “We, the People.” FDR, he insisted, shared the people’s “zest for life and laughter” and praised his willingness to “make fundamental changes.” He concluded his oration with these words of encouragement:

    "Every generation of Americans has faced problems and every generation has overcome them. Like Franklin Roosevelt we know that for free men hope will always be a stronger force than fear, that we only fail when we allow ourselves to be boxed in by the limitations and errors of the past.
    This is not a political gathering. It's a celebration of a great man who led our nation through historic times. It's a celebration shared here today by many who knew and loved him well. Friends, colleagues, and relatives—and for my part, a young sportscaster who first felt the awe and majesty of this office when that familiar caped figure drove down the avenue in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1936, the figure who proved to us all that “Happy Days” could and would come again.
    "

    Reagan delivered this speech at a time in his presidency when the economy was still floundering. One can see that he used the occasion to show how he was following the same leadership path as FDR: believing in freedom rather than fear; being willing to make fundamental changes when necessary; forging a new path that corrects the errors of the past. His policies were wholly different than FDR’s, but he made the connection with the former president based on leadership style. Writing in his diary later that evening, he commented, “The press is dying to paint me as now trying to undo the New Deal. I remind them I voted for FDR. four times. I’m trying to undo the ‘Great Society.’ It was LBJ’s war on poverty that led to our present mess.”

    That diary entry indicates he saw a fundamental difference in the approaches of the New Deal and the Great Society. The Great Society had given the nation “massive increases in social spending,” yet no reduction in the number of citizens below the poverty line, fewer men in the work force, and an astounding increase in children born out of wedlock. Why was this? “I believe the answer lies in the firm difference between the New Deal and the Great Society,” he declared. “The New Deal gave cash to the poor, but the Great Society failed to target assistance to the truly needy and made government the instrument of vast transfer payments, erecting huge bureaucracies to manage hundreds of social programs. The Great Society failed in two crucial aspects: It fostered dependence on government subsidies, and it made the transfer of money from Washington bureaucrats to those in need seem like a mission impossible.” He continued, “I was a New Deal Democrat. And I still believe, today, that there is only one compassionate, sensible, and effective policy for Federal assistance: We must focus domestic spending on the poor and bypass the bureaucracies by giving assistance directly to those who need it.”

    The second event honoring FDR occurred just before Reagan left the presidency. It was at the FDR Library, another luncheon with Roosevelt family members present. The outline of this speech was similar to the earlier one, but Reagan went into more detail concerning what he considered Roosevelt’s legacy. He asserted that FDR “aroused the interest of young men and women in politics and government and drew them into the national service.” It was his “magic,” Reagan believed, that drew idealists to Washington. The effect was felt beyond the Potomac region, though. “All across the Nation, millions of new voters looked at this President who was filled with confidence in the future, faith in the people, and the joy of the democratic rough-and-tumble, and they said to themselves maybe someday they, too, would like to serve the Nation in public life.” Reagan confessed he was one of those millions.

    As he did in the previous speech before the Roosevelt family, Reagan acknowledged the debates that rage concerning FDR’s legacy, but he chose to focus once again on the dire circumstances of the era and how FDR inspired people.

    "The months before FDR took offce are far behind us now. We forget what they were like—the pink slips handed out at factories across the land with no jobs anywhere if you lost yours, the soup kitchens in every major city, the look of desperation in people's eyes. And we forget that, in the unprecedented economic crisis, many had begun to question our most basic institutions, including our democracy itself. And then along came FDR, who put his faith, as he said, “in the forgotten man.”

    ....

    There are other ways in which Reagan revealed his debt to FDR, or at least ways in which he looked to FDR’s example as a guide for his own actions. In the 1970s, Reagan wrote and delivered weekly radio commentaries. Those, by themselves, are a tribute to FDR. In one of those commentaries, he mentioned specifically that government employees have no right to strike. Whom did he quote on that issue? “Franklin Delano Roosevelt said ‘A strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to prevent or obstruct the operations of govt. until their demands are satisfied. Such action looking toward the paralysis of govt. by those who have sworn to support it is unthinkable & intolerable.’” Reagan concluded, “FDR summed it up pretty well.”

    While preparing his run for the presidency in the 1980 campaign, he wrote to the publisher of one of the most conservative newspapers in America regarding how to choose a vice president. “I must confess,” he admitted, “there is a corner way down inside of me that thinks it’s wrong for one man to dictate who the second man on the ticket will be.” He thought perhaps the Republican convention delegates should have more of a say. His model? “Maybe something like FDR used to do when he would approve a list of acceptables for the convention.”

    Even after his conversion to political conservatism, Reagan tended to excuse FDR for his policies, pointing out his good intentions while criticizing the results of those intentions. Was FDR trying to destroy the free enterprise system? Not at all, responded Reagan. He was simply “out to save it at a time of severe stress that had already caused democracy to crumble and fascism and totalitarianism to rear their ugly heads in so many other countries. In America, freedom was saved, and it gave us the strength to rescue a strife-torn Western world in the 1940s and 1950s.” Perhaps FDR did not realize what he had unleashed:

    ''With his alphabet soup of federal agencies, FDR in many ways set in motion the forces that later sought to create big government and bring a form of veiled socialism to America. But I think that many people forget Roosevelt ran for president on a platform dedicated to reducing waste and fat in government. He called for cutting federal spending by twenty-five percent, eliminating useless boards and commissions and returning to states and communities powers that had been wrongfully seized by the federal government. If he had not been distracted by war, I think he would have resisted the relentless expansion of the federal government that followed him. . . . Government giveaway programs, FDR said, “destroy the human spirit,” and he was right. As smart as he was, though, I suspect even FDR didn’t realize that once you created a bureaucracy, it took on a life of its own. It was almost impossible to close down a bureaucracy once it had been created.''

    ]
    Last edited by CaughtintheMiddle1990; 04-24-2011 at 11:13 PM.
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    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    so....what is your point?
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    so....what is your point?
    I thought FDR was an evil dictator who hated America and turned America into a Communist wasteland like the USSR. Why would Ronald Reagan, who many here say was the greatest president of the 20th century, ever say a kind word about him post his conversion to Conservatism, much less while he was President?
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaughtintheMiddle1990 View Post
    I thought FDR was an evil dictator who hated America and turned America into a Communist wasteland like the USSR. Why would Ronald Reagan, who many here say was the greatest president of the 20th century, ever say a kind word about him post his conversion to Conservatism, much less while he was President?
    /sigh didn't read much of those did you? one can admire the way someone does something without liking their policies. in the last paragraph Reagan even says that while FDR was trying in his own way to reduce government that in his short sighted way he saw the creation and increase in Gov.

    FDR might have believed that the Government could spur the private sector to create jobs but all he did was increase the length of the Depression. 1932 saw and even bigger crash of the Stock Exchange than they did in 1929. FDR used "Hope and Change" 70 years before Obama did. Policies had the same results.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    /sigh didn't read much of those did you? one can admire the way someone does something without liking their policies. in the last paragraph Reagan even says that while FDR was trying in his own way to reduce government that in his short sighted way he saw the creation and increase in Gov.

    FDR might have believed that the Government could spur the private sector to create jobs but all he did was increase the length of the Depression. 1932 saw and even bigger crash of the Stock Exchange than they did in 1929. FDR used "Hope and Change" 70 years before Obama did. Policies had the same results.
    He took affront to being accused of wanting to undo the New Deal and said clearly he wanted to do away with simply the Great Society, and even felt that the New Deal's method was compassionate, sensitive and effective, whereas the Great Society wasn't and boggled things down in too much bureaucracy.

    By 1936, unemployment had been cut by ten percent (down from the 25% it was when he took office), and the economy had become to grow again.

    But I know, he was a dictator. He was evil. He HATED America with a burning passion. He made Hitler look like an angel. Reagan will now be thrown under the bus for even admiring him.
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    Senior Member txradioguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaughtintheMiddle1990 View Post
    He took affront to being accused of wanting to undo the New Deal and said clearly he wanted to do away with simply the Great Society, and even felt that the New Deal's method was compassionate, sensitive and effective, whereas the Great Society wasn't and boggled things down in too much bureaucracy.

    By 1936, unemployment had been cut by ten percent (down from the 25% it was when he took office), and the economy had become to grow again.

    But I know, he was a dictator. He was evil. He HATED America with a burning passion. He made Hitler look like an angel. Reagan will now be thrown under the bus for even admiring him.
    Why are you trying so hard to de-construct Ronald Reagan.

    This is try number two now in 24 hours.

    It is a class project or something? A little test your Prof told you to try on us?
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

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    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    so....what is your point?
    Does CITM ever have one?
    "The efforts of the government alone will never be enough. In the end the people must choose and the people must help themselves" ~ JFK; from his famous inauguration speech (What Democrats sounded like before today's neo-Liberals hijacked that party)
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    Quote Originally Posted by txradioguy View Post
    Why are you trying so hard to de-construct Ronald Reagan.

    This is try number two now in 24 hours.

    It is a class project or something? A little test your Prof told you to try on us?
    I didn't force Reagan to say the things he said while President, did I?
    He praised FDR as a "great man" while President. He praised his leadership.He didn't view FDR as an evil man hell bent on destroying America, and in fact credited FDR with saving America from fascism and totalitarianism, from the rise of someone truly evil like Hitler coming into power--which I believe could very well have happened given the dire state of the US in 1932.

    The above in the OP are all things Ronald Wilson Reagan said. Deal with it. It's not a deconstruction, otherwise, it's Reagan deconstructing himself.
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    Senior Member txradioguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaughtintheMiddle1990 View Post
    I didn't force Reagan to say the things he said while President, did I?
    He praised FDR as a "great man" while President. He praised his leadership.He didn't view FDR as an evil man hell bent on destroying America, and in fact credited FDR with saving America from fascism and totalitarianism, from the rise of someone truly evil like Hitler coming into power--which I believe could very well have happened given the dire state of the US in 1932.
    Who here has said he was evil and trying to destroy America?

    He did save America from those things. And we are all grateful for it. Republicans at the time were calling WW II "Mr Roosevelt's war" and while they were publicly supporting it, behind closed doors they were grumbling that he'd gotten us into it on purpose.

    But it is factually correct for anyone to say that FDR stood up to despots on two different sides of the world and did what couldn't be done without America being involved.

    The above in the OP are all things Ronald Wilson Reagan said. Deal with it. It's not a deconstruction, otherwise, it's Reagan deconstructing himself.
    Deal with my dick kid. That's that I think of your "deal with is" bullshit.

    You're the one that came here to a Conservative board and started going all trollish where Reagan is concerned.

    Don't start whinging when someone calls you on it.

    See what you don't understand from your federally funded indoctrination..errr...education...is that unlike todays politicians...Reagan had no problem giving someone from the other party props when they deserved them. You won't find Obama...who has tried to steal Reagan's image as his own...or any other Libtard in D.C. giving credit to ANY Republican past present or future for anything positive they've done or might do.

    What you get from todays crop of Libtards is an invitation to a policy address under the guise of "bi-partisianship" then the speaker publicly humiliates you in front of a national TV audience while you have to sit there and take it.

    In short Reagan had class.
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

    Liberalism Is The Philosophy Of The Stupid

    To Achieve Ordered Liberty You Must Have Moral Order As Well

    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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    Quote Originally Posted by txradioguy View Post
    Who here has said he was evil and trying to destroy America?

    He did save America from those things. And we are all grateful for it. Republicans at the time were calling WW II "Mr Roosevelt's war" and while they were publicly supporting it, behind closed doors they were grumbling that he'd gotten us into it on purpose.

    But it is factually correct for anyone to say that FDR stood up to despots on two different sides of the world and did what couldn't be done without America being involved.



    Deal with my dick kid. That's that I think of your "deal with is" bullshit.

    You're the one that came here to a Conservative board and started going all trollish where Reagan is concerned.

    Don't start whinging when someone calls you on it.

    See what you don't understand from your federally funded indoctrination..errr...education...is that unlike todays politicians...Reagan had no problem giving someone from the other party props when they deserved them. You won't find Obama...who has tried to steal Reagan's image as his own...or any other Libtard in D.C. giving credit to ANY Republican past present or future for anything positive they've done or might do.

    What you get from todays crop of Libtards is an invitation to a policy address under the guise of "bi-partisianship" then the speaker publicly humiliates you in front of a national TV audience while you have to sit there and take it.

    In short Reagan had class.
    I was educated in private school, and only spent a semester and a half in college. Most of what I know historically comes from books I've read, along with other things I've read. I'm a history geek. Most of my threads here are on the subject of past leaders.

    I'd give Reagan where it's due. I totally disagree with his policies for a variety of reasons. However, I will never say that, like FDR, he didn't give hope to America when America needed it. He did. My own ideology is probably more in line with FDR's than Reagan's, but Reagan's spirit, his fatherly sense of hope and inspirational nature brought this country out of a malaise. He was in this way much like FDR, and I find them to be bookends in that sense. Were I President, I would not adopt a Reagan-esque pose like Reagan, but, I would give him historical credit where it is due. Same with Coolidge and Harding--whom I like for my own reasons unrelated to policy. Same with Nixon, whom I greatly admire, and Ford, and ESPECIALLY Eisenhower. All of those men were Republicans, and they were the right men for the job at their particular times in history, and I like them all for various reasons.

    I view the 20th century as the greatest time in America's history, and I believe for the most part, the string of leaders starting with TR and ending with GHW Bush--with the exception of Carter--was the greatest string of Presidents we've ever had after many lackluster 19th century Presidents. I find most of the 19th century Presidents--with the exceptions being Jefferson, Lincoln, Adams, Cleveland and Grant--to have been average and forgettable. I believe the 20th century was indeed America's century, and that the 21st century can also be if we try hard enough and don't lose hope.

    In simply terms of being a LEADER--an inspirational figure, an effective administrator--Reagan was probably the second best president IMO in the 20th century next to FDR.

    In terms of policies, I'd place him lower.
    Last edited by CaughtintheMiddle1990; 04-25-2011 at 12:36 AM.
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