Thread: "University of Kentucky Fired CCP Gun Owner."

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  1. #1 "University of Kentucky Fired CCP Gun Owner." 
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    UK Gun Owner Fired Over Gun in Car (Kentucky)


    The University of Kentucky has fired a graduate student and former anesthesia technician, Michael Mitchell, for keeping a gun in his car a mile away from the university hospital where he was employed.

    The university then proceeded to try to deny Mitchell unemployment compensation by claiming, unsuccessfully, that he was fired for misconduct. A hearing officer found against the University of Kentucky and in favor of Mitchell.

    All this, despite the fact that Mitchell had a Kentucky concealed carry permit, believed he had fully complied with Kentucky law governing concealed carry, and therefore cooperated fully with police and university authorities.

    And finally, Kentucky Revised Statutes sec. 27.020 seems to prevent a state institution like the University of Kentucky from interfering with the Second Amendment rights of a concealed carry permit holder. That section holds, in part, that “[n]o person or organization, public or private, shall prohibit” a concealed carry permit holder from transporting a firearm in his vehicle in accordance with law.

    So....... What’s up with the University of Kentucky?


    The answer is that it’s probably not much different from many Left-leaning universities. After all, Virginia Tech fought hard and successfully to keep guns off its campus – nearly a year, to the day, before a crazed gunman killed 31 people on that campus.....Mitchell appealed a ruling from Fayette Circuit Court Judge Pamela Goodwine, who dismissed his suit against the University of Kentucky because its anti-gun animus “was not a violation of public policy.”

    Judge Goodwine claims to have read U.S. Supreme Court language concerning “exceptions” to the Second Amendment. This language is called “dictum” and is non-binding. ....But Goodwine seems to have missed the point of the Supreme Court’s decision in Heller: Americans have a constitutional right to use firearms to defend themselves. .


    http://gunowners.org/a04272011.htm
    Last edited by megimoo; 05-01-2011 at 12:28 PM.
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  2. #2  
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    Judge Goodwine was born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio. She moved to lexington in November of 1979 to begin a career in the legal profession as a court reporter. She enrolled in the University of Kentucky in January of 1980 to begin her undergraduate studies. Despite many tragedies and obstacles, Judge Goodwine graduated with honors with a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Kentucky in 1991. She continued her graduate studies at the University of Kentucky College of Law and graduated in 1994 with a Juris Doctorate degree. Upon graduating from law school, Judge Goodwine was employed byt he law firm of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs. She practiced law from May of 1994 until her appointment to the bench in August of 1999. Judge Goodwine became the first African American female to be appointed to the bench in Fayette County and subsequently elected. She will complete the unexpired term. Judge Goodwine formerly chaired the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights and also served as a commissioner of the agency for three years. While serving as a commissioner with the Kentucky Human Rights Commission, Judge Goodwine became a certified hearing officer. Judge Goodwine continues to serve on various boards and commissions in Fayette County, including Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky, Lexington Network, Networded!, One Parent House, the Lexington-Fayette County Urban League and Operation Read.

    Judge Goodwine is married to Mr. Lee A. Padgett, Jr. They have two children and four grandchildren.



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  3. #3  
    An Adversary of Linda #'s
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    Judge Goodwine was born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio. She moved to lexington in November of 1979 to begin a career in the legal profession as a court reporter. She enrolled in the University of Kentucky in January of 1980 to begin her undergraduate studies. Despite many tragedies and obstacles, Judge Goodwine graduated with honors with a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Kentucky in 1991. She continued her graduate studies at the University of Kentucky College of Law and graduated in 1994 with a Juris Doctorate degree. Upon graduating from law school, Judge Goodwine was employed byt he law firm of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs. She practiced law from May of 1994 until her appointment to the bench in August of 1999. Judge Goodwine became the first African American female to be appointed to the bench in Fayette County and subsequently elected. She will complete the unexpired term. Judge Goodwine formerly chaired the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights and also served as a commissioner of the agency for three years. While serving as a commissioner with the Kentucky Human Rights Commission, Judge Goodwine became a certified hearing officer. Judge Goodwine continues to serve on various boards and commissions in Fayette County, including Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky, Lexington Network, Networded!, One Parent House, the Lexington-Fayette County Urban League and Operation Read.

    Judge Goodwine is married to Mr. Lee A. Padgett, Jr. They have two children and four grandchildren.



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    So....... What’s up with the University of Kentucky?


    The answer is that it’s probably not much different from many Left-leaning universities. After all, Virginia Tech fought hard and successfully to keep guns off its campus – nearly a year, to the day, before a crazed gunman killed 31 people on that campus.

    Mitchell appealed a ruling from Fayette Circuit Court Judge Pamela Goodwine, who dismissed his suit against the University of Kentucky because its anti-gun animus “was not a violation of public policy.”

    Judge Goodwine claims to have read U.S. Supreme Court language concerning “exceptions” to the Second Amendment. This language is called “dictum” and is non-binding

    But Goodwine seems to have missed the point of the Supreme Court’s decision in Heller: Americans have a constitutional right to use firearms to defend themselves.

    Kentucky concealed carry permit holders aren’t a problem in America. Rather, the problem is liberal anti-gun institutions who want to disarm their students and employees -– at the same time that they are adamantly incompetent in their efforts to protect persons on their property.

    Mitchell appealed directly to the Kentucky Supreme Court, which voted 5-2 to hear his appeal. A win in this lawsuit will end the illegal and discriminatory practice on the university.

    ......
    Pamela R. Goodwine became the first African-American female judge in Fayette County in 1999.

    Born in 1960, Goodwine grew up in Youngstown, OH and as a child dreamed of becoming a judge someday. In 1979, at age 19, she moved to Lexington to begin work as a court reporter.

    But before she could pursue her dream, she had to overcome family tragedy and a health crisis. Her mother was killed by a close relative a few months after the move to Lexington,
    and Goodwine herself battled life-threatening Crohn’s disease, a painful digestive disorder. After surgeries and extensive rehabilitation, she recovered and enrolled at the University of Kentucky, earning a bachelor’s degree in management and then a law degree.

    At Wyatt, Tarrant and Combs’ Lexington office, Goodwine focused her legal career on labor and employment law, including sexual harassment claims and policies. She was appointed a Fayette Circuit Court Judge in 1999, then won election to complete the unexpired term.
    ................................
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