Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 42
  1. #21  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    LOL. Here, the little girls write papers about Diana Ross. Most women her age in Detroit (the little girls' grandmas) despise "Diane Ross". Yet, Sojurner Truth lived in Battle Creek after she escaped from slavery and is a much more interesting historical figure, there are at least two churches in downtown Detroit that were final stops on the Underground Railroad, and numerous other truly historical african-american people and places in the area to write about.
    She's buried right next to James and Ellen White
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #22  
    Senior Member Arroyo_Doble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ft Worth
    Posts
    3,788
    What are the consequences for failure (whatever that is on this test) or the reward for passing?

    Stick a test in front of some high school kids with no consequences and they will bubble it in and lay their heads down to sleep (or disrupt the class until they can get sent out so they can play with thier phones in "detention").

    I have lost faith in testing as a way to gauge knowledge unless there is some teeth in the thing. Graduate or not graduate makes a huge difference in scores from 10th to 12th grade on standardized testing.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #23  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    25,328
    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post


    My whole problem with how a lot of educators teach black history is that they totally take it out of the context of american history, when it should be incorporated into the overall story. It confuses kids to take people and events out of their times and not address other things that were happening in the same era. You can't discuss the civil war without discussing the industrial revolution, for example. The north's win had a lot to do with their industrial development and the south's agriculturally-based economy.
    EXACTLY. And I have no problem what ever dealing with significant black figures when they come up historically. I'm less inclined to accept notion that we should cover someone just because of their skin color during a particular time of the year.
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #24  
    Our widdle friend. Wei Wu Wei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,414
    Policon I understand if you are uncomfortable giving out details (like I am), but do you teach history or social studies?

    What do you feel is important to cover about Martin Luther King Jr?

    I see that schools tend to only focus on "black civil rights" and "I Have a Dream Speech". This is only one part, and also the most Politically Correct aspect of this man's actions.

    Martin Luther King Jr was also extremely active in the anti-war movement, he gave some of the best speeches of the time on the topic of Vietnam, and spoke about the problems of Capitalism and advocated a move towards Democratic Socialism. It is when he started talking about these topics that the FBI got really involved and also when he was assassinated. Most people I talk to have no idea that he even spoke about these topics. Social Studies education in this country (especially in my bass-akwards state of Texas) is a joke.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Smith - Wealth of Nations
    It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #25  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    25,328
    Quote Originally Posted by Wei Wu Wei View Post
    What do you feel is important to cover about Martin Luther King Jr?
    Nothing. he's a small pothole in the road of American History at best.

    I'd much rather deal with Frederick Douglas - Dred Scott - Hiram Revels . . . you know - blacks men of actual historical significance - and men who are not given their due.
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #26  
    Our widdle friend. Wei Wu Wei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,414
    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    Nothing. he's a small pothole in the road of American History at best.

    I'd much rather deal with Frederick Douglas - Dred Scott - Hiram Revels . . . you know - blacks men of actual historical significance - and men who are not given their due.
    wow....
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Smith - Wealth of Nations
    It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #27  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    Nothing. he's a small pothole in the road of American History at best.

    I'd much rather deal with Frederick Douglas - Dred Scott - Hiram Revels . . . you know - blacks men of actual historical significance - and men who are not given their due.
    thats pretty harsh on MLK Jr. He was a very significant figure of the 20th Century, while I agree with you on the other men, you can't just dismiss MLK Jr and what his actions lead to dealing with segregation. No matter how twisted guys like Sharpton and Jesse Jackson have made the message.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #28  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    oklahoma
    Posts
    41,873
    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    Nothing. he's a small pothole in the road of American History at best.

    I'd much rather deal with Frederick Douglas - Dred Scott - Hiram Revels . . . you know - blacks men of actual historical significance - and men who are not given their due.
    I have always admired Booker T. Washington and have read his biography several times. I like to read it when I start feeling sorry for myself.
    How is obama working out for you?
    http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv230/upyourstruly/5d569df9-186a-477b-a665-3ea8a8b9b655_zpse9003e54.jpg
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #29  
    CU's Tallest Midget! PoliCon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    25,328
    Quote Originally Posted by fettpett View Post
    thats pretty harsh on MLK Jr. He was a very significant figure of the 20th Century, while I agree with you on the other men, you can't just dismiss MLK Jr and what his actions lead to dealing with segregation. No matter how twisted guys like Sharpton and Jesse Jackson have made the message.
    Except that the bulk of the civil rights movement had nothing what ever to do with Dr. King - and the civil rights movement as it played itself out in the 1960s did far more damage to the black community and America in general than it did benefit. So while he might have been moderately significant in 20th century American pop culture - in the reality of overall history - not so much.
    Stand up for what is right, even if you have to stand alone.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #30  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    Quote Originally Posted by PoliCon View Post
    Except that the bulk of the civil rights movement had nothing what ever to do with Dr. King - and the civil rights movement as it played itself out in the 1960s did far more damage to the black community and America in general than it did benefit. So while he might have been moderately significant in 20th century American pop culture - in the reality of overall history - not so much.
    and how much of that had to do with guys like Sharpton and Jackson others who assumed leadership after King's death and embraced policies that disintegrated the family structure in the black community?

    While I don't agree with all his stances, he was not an insignificant figure in the overall movement. I do agree that there are figures that had a much more significant and last impact in the civil rights movement and many of them being white men and women.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •