Thread: Number of long-lasting marriages in U.S. has risen, Census Bureau reports

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1 Number of long-lasting marriages in U.S. has risen, Census Bureau reports 
    Number of long-lasting marriages in U.S. has risen, Census Bureau reports

    By Carol Morello, Published: May 18

    Americans may be postponing marriage, and fewer are wedding at all. But what about the people who do get married? They’re staying together longer than they have in years.

    Three in four couples who married after 1990 celebrated a 10-year anniversary, according
    to census statistics reported Wednesday. That was a rise of three percentage points compared with couples who married in the early 1980s, when the nation’s divorce rate was at its highest.

    One reason for the increase, said demographers and sociologists who study families, is that people are marrying later in life, after they have completed their education. Not only are they more mature, but they also are more financially secure.

    “People seem to be finding a new marriage bargain that works for 21st-century couples,” said Andrew Cherlin, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist who studies families. “It’s based on pooling two incomes, replacing the old breadwinner-homemaker bargain that worked well in the ’50s.”

    Researchers increasingly are finding a connection between marriage and education. In 2009, 31 percent of brides had a college degree, up from 21 percent in 1996.

    “Marriage has become a much more selective institution in today’s society,” said W. Bradford Wilcox, director of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia. “People who are college-educated, more affluent or more religious are more likely to get married and stay married. People who are not are less likely to get married in the first place, and if they do marry, they’re more likely to divorce.”

    (snip)

    Most Americans marry once and stick to it.

    According to the census statistics, more than half of the nation’s married couples have been together at least 15 years. About a third have marked their 25th anniversaries, and 6 percent have been married more than 50 years.
    Wa Po
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Fabulous Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    10,161
    I always found it interesting that neither my parents nor any of my close friends parents were divorced. Which is not to say that everything was peachy in all of those households, my best friend's parents had essentially separated by the time we were sixteen, but they never divorced. So in my core group of about ten people, there were no divorces.

    I wonder if people whose parents were divorced at the same age, if their core group also consisted of people whose parents had divorced.

    My mother's brother was the first member of our family that I am aware of to have been divorced in the last 400 years.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    I always found it interesting that neither my parents nor any of my close friends parents were divorced. Which is not to say that everything was peachy in all of those households, my best friend's parents had essentially separated by the time we were sixteen, but they never divorced. So in my core group of about ten people, there were no divorces.

    I wonder if people whose parents were divorced at the same age, if their core group also consisted of people whose parents had divorced.

    My mother's brother was the first member of our family that I am aware of to have been divorced in the last 400 years.
    I think it certainly helps to have good role model of what marriage is really like. When parents divorce and the children are in the 8 - 16 range, I think the impacts are really devastating (but never good at any age). Working through the ups and downs is really part of the multi-year teaching that parents need to give to their kids across time.

    If you just go by TV or the Internet, marriage is one long fun fest frequently interrupted by increasingly risque sex and joyful parenthood moments. Then when the kids go off to fully paid scholarships in the Ivy League, the folks can finally embark on their lifelong learning/vacationing odyssey and maybe climb Mt. Everest sometime before they hit 90.

    Marriage is a series of shrewd decisions, thoughtful compromises, and complicated negotiations that more often than not involve small, nearly trivial things. It's about making your day-to-day experience of being part of a couple satisfying and productive. It's tough to write up in a sexy, romantic way so kids need to see it first hand.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Michigan (in Exile)
    Posts
    8,757
    I can't think of any of my close friends who's parents who got divorced, including mine, except for my wife's parent's but they got divorced in '86
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •