Thread: How to clean your washing machine

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  1. #1 How to clean your washing machine 
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    I know this sounds pretty mundane, but appliances are expensive. I found these tips to be helpful and will be sure to leave the door open on our front loading washer. We were lucky that the previous owners left their washer and dryer here.
    [QUOTE
    How to Clean a Washing Machine

    By Christina Peterson






    More from Good Housekeeping


    In order for a washing machine to continue to keep getting your clothes clean, it needs to be kept clean itself. Here's how to keep your washer in top shape.

    When a cycle's finished, remove the load promptly. This will prevent a musty smell from developing in the washtub and then being transferred to your clothes and linens.
    Running a monthly cleaning cycle can eliminate any odors that do develop. Many newer models have a special washer cleaning cycle. If yours doesn't, add liquid chlorine bleach to the dispenser and run a normal cycle with hot water; or use a speciality cleaner, like Affresh or Tide Washing Machine Cleaner (following the packaging directions. If you have a front-loader, be sure to wipe the rubber gasket.
    After each use, lift the lid or keep the door slightly ajar to allow air to circulate and dry out any remaining moisture. Don't forget to remove any water or fabric softener gunk from the dispenser drawers. For help on how to clean them out, check your washer's manual.

    If you have a pet that sheds in the house, there's no way around it, you're going to find pet hair in your washer after running several loads. The easiest way to remove it is to leave the door open until the pet hair and drum are thoroughly dry. Then, using your vac's soft brush attachment, vacuum out the pet hair.

    Don't forget to clean the exterior of your washer too. Use a soft damp cloth to wipe up spills and never use an abrasive cleanser or solvent which can scratch and damage the surface.

    There is a hidden spot in your washing machine that you may have never thought to clean before -- the inlet hose filters. You'll find them inside the water inlet connections. Their purpose is to keep minerals and debris in your water from getting inside the washer. And when they're clogged, water won't flow adequately into the machine for a wash cycle.

    If your old washer has died or you want to find a more efficient model, here's the dirt on the best washing machines. Need more info on which type of washing machine you should buy? Check out our washing machine buying guide advice.

    To get a firsthand look at how we tested washing machines, tour the Good Houskeeping Research Institute][/quote]

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  2. #2  
    Loss Prevention RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Good tips.

    I also run an empty cycle through my dishwasher once in a while also.
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  3. #3  
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    With the prices of the new ones, I am going to run my 20 year old Maytag washer and dryer forever. Neither one has ever been repaired. However, I only wash 2 or 3 loads a week.

    Good tips on keeping them clean and odorless though.
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  4. #4  
    Loss Prevention RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lacarnut View Post
    With the prices of the new ones, I am going to run my 20 year old Maytag washer and dryer forever. Neither one has ever been repaired. However, I only wash 2 or 3 loads a week.

    Good tips on keeping them clean and odorless though.
    I am not a fan of front loaders. And now with new EPA regulations that started the first of the year I hate the new ones even more, they tell me how much water I am allowed to use per load..

    That gasket on the front loading washing machine door can often get quite nasty and moldy....they used to be very hard to clean. I don't know if they have approved that or not, but if not, they should.
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post
    I am not a fan of front loaders. And now with new EPA regulations that started the first of the year I hate the new ones even more, they tell me how much water I am allowed to use per load..

    That gasket on the front loading washing machine door can often get quite nasty and moldy....they used to be very hard to clean. I don't know if they have approved that or not, but if not, they should.
    I like my top loading washing machine. Gonna keep my Maytag till it falls apart. I have had good luck with my other appliances which are Whirlpool.
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  6. #6  
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    We have the Maytag Neptune washer and dryer. It's a front loader and has a large capacity. So far we're very pleased with them. The previous owner left them, and we think they're probably about 7 years old (they had lived here 7 years and remodeled everything). So far we've had to have the refrigerator repaired and the dishwasher replaced. Appliances don't last the way they used to.

    The Maytag frontloader seems good, mainly in comparison to the ones I had in St Louis. They were the stackables, as the only place for the washer and dryer upstairs was in a small closet in the kitchen. There just was no room for anything larger. SR hated the washer, as you could hardly get anything into it and it never seemed to get stuff cleaned. Everything came out wrinkled in the tiny dryer.
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  7. #7  
    Loss Prevention RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaintLouieWoman View Post
    We have the Maytag Neptune washer and dryer. It's a front loader and has a large capacity. So far we're very pleased with them. The previous owner left them, and we think they're probably about 7 years old (they had lived here 7 years and remodeled everything). So far we've had to have the refrigerator repaired and the dishwasher replaced. Appliances don't last the way they used to.

    The Maytag frontloader seems good, mainly in comparison to the ones I had in St Louis. They were the stackables, as the only place for the washer and dryer upstairs was in a small closet in the kitchen. There just was no room for anything larger. SR hated the washer, as you could hardly get anything into it and it never seemed to get stuff cleaned. Everything came out wrinkled in the tiny dryer.
    Sounds like the Maytag Neptune is much better then you had before.

    I really liked Maytag before they moved out of Galesburg, IL and went to Mexico. The quality went down.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobJohnson View Post
    I really liked Maytag before they moved out of Galesburg, IL and went to Mexico. The quality went down.
    I think I paid around 300 bucks each for my washer and dryer. They do not make appliances like they used to and that goes for all brands. My whirlpool ice maker had to be replaced after just 4 years.
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  9. #9  
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    We just replaced a Whirlpool washer/dryer after over twenty years - not because they were broken, but because we were redoing the laundry room and replaced the machines before they needed it. Washer and dryer technology has come a long way in 20 years, as it turns out - and we bought Whirlpool again.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    We just replaced a Whirlpool washer/dryer after over twenty years - not because they were broken, but because we were redoing the laundry room and replaced the machines before they needed it. Washer and dryer technology has come a long way in 20 years, as it turns out - and we bought Whirlpool again.
    That was the brand in the home in St Louis, the compact ones. They weren't the best, but it could be due to the size.

    RobJ, when did the Maytag plant move to Mexico? The ones the previous owner left are probably at least 8 years old by now.
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