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  1. #1 UN says eat less meat to curb global warming 
    Sonnabend
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    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environmen...d.foodanddrink


    · Climate expert urges radical shift in diet
    · Industry unfairly targeted - farmers

    * Juliette Jowit, environment editor
    * The Observer,
    * Sunday September 7 2008

    People should have one meat-free day a week if they want to make a personal and effective sacrifice that would help tackle climate change, the world's leading authority on global warming has told The Observer

    Dr Rajendra Pachauri, chair of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which last year earned a joint share of the Nobel Peace Prize, said that people should then go on to reduce their meat consumption even further.

    His comments are the most controversial advice yet provided by the panel on how individuals can help tackle global warning.

    Pachauri, who was re-elected the panel's chairman for a second six-year term last week, said diet change was important because of the huge greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental problems - including habitat destruction - associated with rearing cattle and other animals. It was relatively easy to change eating habits compared to changing means of transport, he said.

    The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation has estimated that meat production accounts for nearly a fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions. These are generated during the production of animal feeds, for example, while ruminants, particularly cows, emit methane, which is 23 times more effective as a global warming agent than carbon dioxide. The agency has also warned that meat consumption is set to double by the middle of the century.

    'In terms of immediacy of action and the feasibility of bringing about reductions in a short period of time, it clearly is the most attractive opportunity,' said Pachauri. 'Give up meat for one day [a week] initially, and decrease it from there,' said the Indian economist, who is a vegetarian.

    However, he also stressed other changes in lifestyle would help to combat climate change. 'That's what I want to emphasise: we really have to bring about reductions in every sector of the economy.'

    Pachauri can expect some vociferous responses from the food industry to his advice, though last night he was given unexpected support by Masterchef presenter and restaurateur John Torode, who is about to publish a new book, John Torode's Beef. 'I have a little bit and enjoy it,' said Torode. 'Too much for any person becomes gluttony. But there's a bigger issue here: where [the meat] comes from. If we all bought British and stopped buying imported food we'd save a huge amount of carbon emissions.'

    Tomorrow, Pachauri will speak at an event hosted by animal welfare group Compassion in World Farming, which has calculated that if the average UK household halved meat consumption that would cut emissions more than if car use was cut in half.

    The group has called for governments to lead campaigns to reduce meat consumption by 60 per cent by 2020. Campaigners have also pointed out the health benefits of eating less meat. The average person in the UK eats 50g of protein from meat a day, equivalent to a chicken breast and a lamb chop - a relatively low level for rich nations but 25-50 per cent more than World Heath Organisation guidelines.

    Professor Robert Watson, the chief scientific adviser for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs, who will also speak at tomorrow's event in London, said government could help educate people about the benefits of eating less meat, but it should not 'regulate'. 'Eating less meat would help, there's no question about that, but there are other things,' Watson said.

    However, Chris Lamb, head of marketing for pig industry group BPEX, said the meat industry had been unfairly targeted and was working hard to find out which activities had the biggest environmental impact and reduce those. Some ideas were contradictory, he said - for example, one solution to emissions from livestock was to keep them indoors, but this would damage animal welfare. 'Climate change is a very young science and our view is there are a lot of simplistic solutions being proposed,' he said.

    Last year a major report into the environmental impact of meat eating by the Food Climate Research Network at Surrey University claimed livestock generated 8 per cent of UK emissions - but eating some meat was good for the planet because some habitats benefited from grazing. It also said vegetarian diets that included lots of milk, butter and cheese would probably not noticeably reduce emissions because dairy cows are a major source of methane, a potent greenhouse gas released through flatulence.


    ..aren't cows sacred in india?
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member LogansPapa's Avatar
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    Are there more or less cattle alive at this moment than 25 years ago?
    At Coretta Scott King's funeral in early 2006, Ethel Kennedy, the widow of Robert Kennedy, leaned over to him and whispered, "The torch is being passed to you." "A chill went up my spine," Obama told an aide. (Newsweek)
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  3. #3  
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    Are there more or less trees in the US than there were 100 years ago??
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member LogansPapa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubs View Post
    Are there more or less trees in the US than there were 100 years ago??
    Enough to make up for the ones lost in the Amazon in the same timeframe?
    At Coretta Scott King's funeral in early 2006, Ethel Kennedy, the widow of Robert Kennedy, leaned over to him and whispered, "The torch is being passed to you." "A chill went up my spine," Obama told an aide. (Newsweek)
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  5. #5  
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    So eating PLANTS, which supposedly are supposed to help curb global warming (via carbon indulgences, er, I mean "offsets"), is better?
    OPEACHMENT NOW!!!

    Stinger:
    "I was... ordered to drop my pants, bend over and spread my cheeks."
    --RagingInMiami achieving the DUmp's highest level of nirvana
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  6. #6  
    noonwitch
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    I do think it's better for people to either eat less meat or eat "healthier" meat. If our stores still bought beef and chicken from family farmers, instead of huge, corporate "Bovine Universities", these issues wouldn't be there, and the meat would be healthier without all those chemicals and hormones.

    I can taste the difference between amish chicken and the regular Tyson's or store brand chicken. Unfortunately, the amish is more expensive.

    I don't know about other parts of the country, but the PBB thing in Michigan in the 70s pretty much killed family farming in our state.
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  7. #7  
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    Our usual weekly diet is one or two meat dishes, one or two chicken dishes, three fish dinners, and one vegetarian. That's for health reasons, not planetary reasons.
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  8. #8  
    Sonnabend
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    Are there more or less cattle alive at this moment than 25 years ago?
    I have no idea..why dont you go and count them.

    Time to get a moooo-ove on.:D
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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by LogansPapa View Post
    Are there more or less cattle alive at this moment than 25 years ago?
    Better questions. Do the cattle alive today taste better than cattle 25 years ago? Also, has there been a price increase in BBQ sauce over the last 25 when cost of living adjustments have been factored in? These are the most pressing historical cattle questions I have.

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Our usual weekly diet is one or two meat dishes, one or two chicken dishes, three fish dinners, and one vegetarian. That's for health reasons, not planetary reasons.
    Aren't chickens considered meat?

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
    C. S. Lewis
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