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  1. #1 The Beauty of Forgiveness -- Peggy Sue 
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    It makes one wonder why humans can't forgive. Often folks say that animals can't feel or think or have emotions. It's not true in my opinion. Greyhounds suffer unbearable treatment, yet they stay loving and sweet.

    This is a story of Peggy Sue. There's a reason why I still have a framed pic of Jane Goodall in my guest bedroom. I saw her some time ago, from a distance, when I attended a lecture sponsored by the St Louis Zoo. This little story explains why Jane Goodall persists despite her age in saving the chimps from the cruel labs. Sorry, know I'm a conservative, but what they do to these animals is just wrong.

    If you knew Peggy Sue,
    then you'd know why I feel blue...

    Peggy, one of the grande dames of Save the Chimps, passed away on August 20, 2011, at the age of 48. Affectionately nicknamed “Peggy Sue” by her caregivers, Peggy was beloved by both chimpanzees and humans. Her dignity, strength, and capacity to forgive were core strengths of her character that serve as an inspiration to us all.

    Peggy was most likely born somewhere in Africa in the early 1960s. She was ended up at the Institute for Primate Studies (IPS) in Norman, OK. When IPS closed in the early 1980s, Peggy was sent to the Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Surgery in Primates (LEMSIP), where she resided for 15 years. At LEMSIP, she was darted with ketamine 163 times, was subjected to 16 liver punch biopsies, and had six children. Unlike so many of the chimps at LEMSIP who were forced to endure years of isolation, Peggy sometimes resided with other chimps, including Lulu, a resident of Black Beauty Ranch, and Mona, who was rescued by Save the Chimps this year.

    When LEMSIP closed, Peggy was sent to yet another lab, The Coulston Foundation (TCF), arriving September 17, 1996. Although she was assigned to one study while at TCF, the number of times she was subjected to anesthesia decreased markedly, enduring 16 “knockdowns” in her 6 years at TCF. She also gave birth to a daughter, Kiley, who was taken from her. Just one day shy of her 6th anniversary at TCF, Peggy was rescued by Save the Chimps, on September 16, 2002.

    The trials that Peggy endured in her life at the hands of humans could have turned her against her new caregivers forever. But she accepted us with grace and kindness, and enjoyed the positive changes in her life. Peggy became a member of the first complete chimpanzee family to migrate to Florida, which came to be known as Alice’s Group. Peggy was instrumental in the success of this family, which was composed of chimps who had traumatic pasts and little social experience. She became an adoptive mother to young Elway and Pamela, guiding them as if they were her own children. Jeffrey fell in love with her (although his passion may have been unrequited.) She developed deep and abiding friendships with fellow LEMSIP veterans Carrie, Thelma, Melissa, and Tash. She was especially connected to Carrie. When Carrie passed away, her ashes were scattered on the island, near her favorite tree and platform. Afterwards, Peggy went out onto the island and immediately visited these spots and began crying. We have never witnessed such behavior before or since.


    Peggy enjoyed the company of her chimpanzee family, her caregivers, and the beauty of her island until her final moments. She passed away peacefully, nestled in the cool grass on a sunny Florida summer day. She was a remarkable, beautiful soul who is deeply missed. May Peggy’s spirit inspire us all to be a little more kind, a little more forgiving, and to always treat others with dignity.




    If you knew Peggy Sue, then you'd know why I feel blue, about Peggy,
    my Peggy Sue. Oh well, I love you gal, I love you Peggy Sue…

    As a tribute to Peggy, Donate or Adopt Elway in Her Honor





    Thank you for your compassion and support.

    Your generosity has and continues to make a difference in the
    One of the trainers at Mote Marine also works at this chimp center on the weekends. A co-worker from the St Louis Zoo also works there. They do a world of good there.
    Last edited by SaintLouieWoman; 08-29-2011 at 07:12 PM.
    http://http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r231/SarasotaRepub/83069bcc.png

    " To the world you are just one more person, but to a rescued pet, you are the world."

    "
    A Nation of Sheep Breeds a Government of Wolves!"


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