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  1. #1 "Protester falls to his knees in tears in front of Chase Bank crying" 
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
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    Looks to me like he fell in front of the cameras...

    Sorry, I don't believe it and even if the bank did take the house there was probably a legal reason why the did.

    The DUmmies seem more upset by the fact they can't see the pic...


    Earth_First (1000+ posts) Sat Sep-24-11 09:02 PM
    Original message"Protester falls to his knees in tears in front of Chase Bank crying"




    "Protester falls to his knees in tears in front of Chase Bank crying -this is the bank that took my parents' home.".
    May the FORCE be with you!
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member Bailey's Avatar
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    I would laugh in his face and tell him that its his parents fault for getting a house they couldnt afford. No one owes you anything in this life.
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  3. #3  
    Destroyer of Worlds Apocalypse's Avatar
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    Reminds me of another photo.



    Both staged and fake as hell. If it was a spontaneous moment, he wouldn't have been surrounded by all those camera and sound recorders for his "Moment"
    Rest In Peace America
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member FDK's Avatar
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    What he should have said:

    This is the bank that foreclosed on my parents house when they stopped making mortgage payments.
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  5. #5  
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    This photo op notwithstanding, is there anyone here who doubts that Chase Bank is an international criminal enterprise with no national loyalty?

    You can't whine about the Fed and give Chase Bank a pass. Chase Bank has been bleeding the American people dry, all of the American people not simply the ones who had the misfortune to borrow money from Chase. Like the Black Hand, whatever you do, Chase gets a piece of it.
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  6. #6  
    eeeevil Sith Admin SarasotaRepub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    This photo op notwithstanding, is there anyone here who doubts that Chase Bank is an international criminal enterprise with no national loyalty?

    You can't whine about the Fed and give Chase Bank a pass. Chase Bank has been bleeding the American people dry, all of the American people not simply the ones who had the misfortune to borrow money from Chase. Like the Black Hand, whatever you do, Chase gets a piece of it.
    Chase is a bank and they do bank stuff. Why would you assume they would not act in their best interests??? If this story is true, someone defaulted on their mortgage and lost their home. Is that Chase's fault? Or is if the fault of the mortgagee?

    A story like this one is missing too much info. The guys parents may have been idiots, we don't know. We do know a bank isn't going to cut you a break just to be nice.

    Are they criminal? In this story I don't see how, and what does "national loyalty" have to do with it? Chase is a global corp that answers to its stockholders.

    I like the Black Hand reference though, very eeeeeeeeeeeeeevil. :D
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  7. #7  
    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    This photo op notwithstanding, is there anyone here who doubts that Chase Bank is an international criminal enterprise with no national loyalty?

    You can't whine about the Fed and give Chase Bank a pass. Chase Bank has been bleeding the American people dry, all of the American people not simply the ones who had the misfortune to borrow money from Chase. Like the Black Hand, whatever you do, Chase gets a piece of it.
    Here's a thought: If you borrow money from said bank and sign the papers, you are agreeing with whatever terms they put forth. If you don't agree with them, you don't sign. But if you do sign, make the payments. It really is that simple.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Here's a thought: If you borrow money from said bank and sign the papers, you are agreeing with whatever terms they put forth. If you don't agree with them, you don't sign. But if you do sign, make the payments. It really is that simple.
    How about when you get a letter in the mail which says that the bank has decided that you need to carry more flood insurance, in fact they want you to carry twice as much insurance as it would cost to build your house from scratch?

    If you don't have equity in that house, don't you think you would be tempted to tell them to stick it up their ass?

    A lot of people started off with PITA payments which were manageable but which now have doubled due to taxes and insurance. In the entire time my parents were paying for their first house, their mortgage payment didn't vary more than a few dollars. That's a big part of what's going on.
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Madisonian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJCardFan View Post
    Here's a thought: If you borrow money from said bank and sign the papers, you are agreeing with whatever terms they put forth. If you don't agree with them, you don't sign. But if you do sign, make the payments. It really is that simple.
    Not always the case, especially with a mortgage.
    We took out a mortgage with a local bank that sold it to Countrywide that sold it to Chase. We had no say in any of the transfers.
    Chase has been a particular PITA to us because years ago I had to file for bankruptcy on a failed business and Chase had lost about $20,000 in the deal. (We made them a settlement offer but they refused and the bankruptcy court stiffed them altogether.) On more than 1 occasion they have "misplaced" or "not received" the mortgage payment by the due date (we use online payment) and charge us a late fee that we then play hell to get reversed and twice have reported to the credit bureau that we were past due and only the threat of legal action against them got those fixed.

    I would rather do business with a Mexican drug cartel than Chase.
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  10. #10  
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    Oh Please. What poppycock.

    What happened is that people started using their homes as piggy banks. As the values rose, people refinanced to take out the equity. They then had a super time with all that free money. They went on vacations, they bought new stuff. They spent it. When they ran out, they refinanced again. Eventually they were refinancing in order to make the payments and pay bills. Then they ran out of refinance.

    No one forced these people to buy homes they couldn't afford, or to refinance the homes they could afford until they could no longer afford it. Chase didn't run around putting guns to people's heads forcing them to take out mortgages.

    A friend of mine did a superb job of being smarter than the stupid who had such a good time. She refinanced her home to buy a rental. Refinanced her home and the rental to buy another rental. Home values rose. She took out equity to buy two more rentals. Then she refinanced three rentals to pay off the mortgage on one rental. She used the total profit from rent to pay down the mortgage on the second rental. Refinanced and paid off that balance. Just before the bubble burst, she sold the first paid off rental and used to proceeds to pay off the mortgages on the last rental and her own home. She has three fully paid for rental homes and a fully paid for residence. In all those years, not one single vacation. Not a day off. Now, she's retired with a nice income, except for one thing. There are still too many people who feel like they shouldn't have to pay rent. It should be free.


    Yeah banks like Chase are really highway robbers. Every lender is a criminal enterprise. Every business is a criminal enterprise. Everything should be free.
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