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  1. #1 A More Progressive Tax System Makes People Happier, 54-Nation Study Finds 
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    DUer explains an inconvenient truth and the thread shuts down. I'm sure they are all sticking their head in the sand in denial so that they can claim the same lies tomorrow.

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    pampango Donating Member (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to add this author to your Ignore list Wed Sep-28-11 02:05 PM
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    A More Progressive Tax System Makes People Happier, 54-Nation Study Finds

    ... a new study comparing 54 nations found that flattening the tax risks flattening social wellbeing as well. "The more progressive the tax policy is, the happier the citizens are," says University of Virginia psychologist Shigehiro Oishi, summarizing the findings, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

    The results: On average, residents of the nations with the most progressive taxation evaluated their own lives as closer to "the best possible." They also reported having more satisfying experiences and fewer discomfiting ones than respondents living in nations with less progressive taxes. That happiness, Oishi says, was "explained by a greater degree of satisfaction with the public goods, such as housing, education, and public transportation."

    Higher government spending per se did not yield greater happiness, in spite of the well-being that was associated with satisfaction with state-funded services. In fact, there was a slight negative correlation between government spending and average happiness.

    "That data is kind of weird," Oishi says. He guesses that the misalignment might indicate national differences in the efficiency with which those services are delivered or in people's relative ability to access them. For example, the U.S. spends more on education and health care than other developed countries, "but its international standing in those areas is not so great." Such puzzling findings may be illuminated in further research.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/1109061524...
    DrunkenBoat (560 posts)
    Wed Sep-28-11 02:17 PM
    Response to Original message
    5. It's not weird at all. Less inequality = more social happiness, all other things being equal.

    Inequality breeds social/psychological problems, and the damage done by those can't be remediated by social spending, because social spending is generally a reinforcement of the existing inequality ("You get welfare/housing aid/food stamps/etc., you are inferior & I am superior").

    I am convinced that after basic needs for food, shelter, clothing are met, the most important things for human beings are respect, competence, & to be needed/have a function/role in their family/community/society.

    Inequality & phony 'competition' designed to draw an arbitrary line between the competent & incompetent screws the pooch on all that.

    As an example of fake competition, take grading on a curve rather than by mastery of a task.
    indepat (1000+ posts)
    Wed Sep-28-11 03:36 PM
    Response to Original message
    6. On the other hand, a very regressive tax system, as in the United States, Updated at 8:22 PM

    makes most of the uber-wealthy, with some noted exceptions, very happy as does it surely all Republicans elected to national office and far too many Democrats. :patriot:
    IndyPragmatist (426 posts)
    Wed Sep-28-11 03:39 PM
    Response to Reply #6
    7. According to the OECD, we have the most progressive tax system

    http://www.oecd.org/document/4/0,334..._1_1_1,00.html
    Oh Oh...
    pampango Donating Member (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to add this author to your Ignore list Wed Sep-28-11 03:53 PM
    Response to Reply #7
    8. Didn't see anything at the link to substantiate that. In the US "country notes"

    the link led to the following information:

    Rich households in America have been leaving both middle and poorer income groups behind. This has happened in many countries, but nowhere has this trend been so stark as in the United States. The average income of the richest 10% is US$93,000 US$ in purchasing power parities, the highest level in the OECD. However, the poorest 10% of the US citizens have an income of US$5,800 US$ per year about 20% lower than the average for OECD countries.

    The distribution of earnings widened by 20% since the mid-1980s which is more than in most other OECD countries. This is the main reason for widening inequality in America.

    Redistribution of income by government plays a relatively minor role in the United States. ... This is partly because the level of spending on social benefits such as unemployment benefits and family benefits is low equivalent to just 9% of household incomes, while the OECD average is 22%. The effectiveness of taxes and transfers in reducing inequality has fallen still further in the past 10 years.

    Social mobility is lower in the United States than in other countries like Denmark, Sweden and Australia. Children of poor parents are less likely to become rich than children of rich parents.
    IndyPragmatist (426 posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to add this author to your Ignore list Wed Sep-28-11 04:03 PM
    Response to Reply #8
    9. It's based on their numbers, you have to actually download the full report

    By comparing the share of taxes paid by the top 10% to the share of income earned by the top 10%, you see that the USA comes in at a ratio of 1.35.

    For comparison's sake, here are some other nations ratios.

    United States
    1.35
    Ireland
    1.26
    Italy
    1.18
    Australia
    1.29
    United Kingdom
    1.20
    New Zealand
    1.19
    Canada
    1.22
    Finland
    1.20
    Slovak Republic
    1.14
    Luxembourg
    1.15
    Belgium
    0.94
    Austria
    1.10
    Korea
    1.17
    Poland
    0.84
    Japan
    1.01
    Norway
    0.95
    France
    1.10
    Denmark
    1.02
    Sweden
    1.00
    Iceland
    0.90
    Switzerland
    0.89
    *crickets*

    What they really don't like is the disparity between the wealthy and the poor, because..........IT'S NOT FAIR!!!11!!1 The only way to get that money is to tax the wealthy, so they harp on "it's not fair" and lie about the amount the wealthy do pay in taxes, claiming they should pay more.

    They think that those who work for their money and are wealthy are obligated to give everyone else who is lazy, ignorant, and who have made bad choice after bad choice (notice I didn't say the disabled) money so the income disparity is less.
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member DumbAss Tanker's Avatar
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    Major pwnage.

    :D
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member newshutr's Avatar
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    Was going to say...we already have a progressive tax system..

    Unless they meant a tax system made up by progressives...err...socialists..
    Yes..this camera is heavy.
    No...you can't be on TV.
    Look kid, go bother the reporter...I'm busy!!!
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  4. #4  
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    So they are basically admitting that people having more than them upsets them.

    Somebody needs to bump that thread. For some odd reason, after IndyPragmatist posted the thread seems to have lost some of its popularity.

    Can anyone figure out where to go on that site to download those numbers?
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