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  1. #11  
    Sonnabend
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    The Moon landings were a crowning moment for the US and for the world. No one will ever forget those incredible moments.

    Yet what is forgotten, and ignored or conveniently brushed over, is that that one moment was the end result of the work and dedication of so many. Look at Apollo 13. Her retrieval and the safety of her crew depended on many critical factors, but had not men and women overseas watched, monitored and relayed essential data when you passed into the ecliptic, the US could have reacquired signal to find three dead crewmen.

    When Armstrong walked on the Moon, he did so with the help of others who watched his back whilst you slept.

    All I am saying, and what is being so conveniently ignored, is that that help, that work and dedication is thrown away with the words 'we did it all"

    You did NOT.

    Many scientific advances these days are made by people OUTSIDE the US, yet all i seem to hear is that the US did this, the US did that..is it so hard for you to acknowledge and accept that you do not do anything alone, and that even today, advances in space technology are a JOINT effort.?

    Look at this statement:

    and the ISS is largely American built?
    No it is not, and was not, and never was. There is a world outside the borders of the US, there are people who accomplish great things, and their achievements are NO LESS VALID.

    This is a list of ALL the nations with a stake in the ISS, and have all had a part in its success.

    Belgium
    Brazil
    Canada
    Denmark
    France
    Germany
    Italy
    Japan
    The Netherlands
    Norway
    Russia
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    The United Kingdom
    The United States

    Source


    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA headquarters, in Washington, D.C., exercises management over the NASA field Centers, establishes management policies, and analyzes all phases of the space station program.

    Roscosmos, the Russian Federal Space Agency


    Roscosmos oversees all Russian human space flight activities. Moscow Mission Control is the primary Russian facility for the control of human space flight. It is located in Korolev, outside of Moscow.

    Canadian Space Agency (CSA)

    The MSS Operations Complex in Longueuil, Quebec, provides the resources, equipment, and expertise needed for the engineering and monitoring of the Mobile Servicing System as well as for crew training.

    European Space Agency (ESA)

    The European Space Research and Technology Centre, the largest site and the technical heart of the ESA, is in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Most ESA projects are developed here by more than 2,000 specialists.

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

    In addition to the JAXA headquarters in Tokyo and other field centers throughout the country, Tsukuba Space Center and Tanegashima launch Facility are JAXA’s primary ISS facilities.

    Credit where it is due. Is asking that so hard? Hm?
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member ironhorsedriver's Avatar
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    The Chinese are definitely going to be a major player in Space. Good, maybe it will fire up a more competent US President. It really does disturb me to know that we can't even put our Astronauts in space any longer.
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  3. #13  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    I did not say that other countries didn't have a stake in the ISS, only that the majority of the modules were either built in the US or financed wholly or partially by the US including ESA and Russian modules. All the other countries were important and continue to be.
    "Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offense, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the Majesty of Heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings..." Patrick Henry
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  4. #14  
    Sonnabend
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    Whatever, Fett, grown tired of you.
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  5. #15  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonnabend View Post
    Whatever, Fett, grown tired of you.
    The US footed the bill for most of the ISS, both building and putting it in space. get over it.

    does it mean that the other countries contributions are any less? no. You're trying to make it sound like the US didn't do as much as we did. Up until July WE'VE done almost everything. Russian's put up a couple, Japan did as well, rest WE put up there.

    It's bull that this fucking idiot we have in the White House shut down the Shuttles before we had a viable alternative and canceled the Atlas V rocket program when it was close to being done (which is the program that L-M is continuing as a private operation).
    "Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offense, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the Majesty of Heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings..." Patrick Henry
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  6. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironhorsedriver View Post
    The Chinese are definitely going to be a major player in Space. Good, maybe it will fire up a more competent US President. It really does disturb me to know that we can't even put our Astronauts in space any longer.
    While I disagree that the Chinese will ever become a major player, I do sympathize with your feelings about American astronauts left stranded on an empty launch pad with their thumb out.

    In the future will there be a movie about the Last American Astronaut, and will the theater goers leave silently in tears? Maybe.:(
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  7. #17  
    PORCUS STAPHUS ADMIN Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TruckerMe View Post
    While I disagree that the Chinese will ever become a major player, I do sympathize with your feelings about American astronauts left stranded on an empty launch pad with their thumb out.

    In the future will there be a movie about the Last American Astronaut, and will the theater goers leave silently in tears? Maybe.:(
    One day Obama will leave like a bad chili dinner and maybe we can build things back up again.
    "If the Bible is true why don't we have any urns or vessels that like say expires 6/15/300 BC on the bottom?"
    Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
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  8. #18  
    Sonnabend
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    Fett, if you will be so kind as to post data on the financing and resources involved , I will read and agree with you if that data bears you out.

    Fair?

    Rock: I hope so.
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  9. #19  
    Best Bounty Hunter in the Forums fettpett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonnabend View Post
    Fett, if you will be so kind as to post data on the financing and resources involved , I will read and agree with you if that data bears you out.

    Fair?

    Rock: I hope so.
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/st...d_figures.html

    As of August 2011, there have been 135 launches to the space station since the launch of the first module, Zarya, at 1:40 a.m. EST on Nov. 20, 1998: 74 Russian vehicles, 37 space shuttles, two European and two Japanese vehicles. The final space shuttle mission July 8-21 by Atlantis delivered 4 1/2 tons of supplies in the Raffaello logistics module.
    most of the Russian launches i believe have been unmanned supplies, where as all 38 space shuttle ones have been manned.

    http://historical.whatitcosts.com/fa...tation-pg2.htm
    As in any government project, the ultimate cost is predicted to be far higher than the original expectations. And with so many different governments involved with varying currency values the true overall cost will probably never be certain.

    In the United States, NASA reports only the costs relating to the mission, mission integration, and launch facility processing as expenses for the ICC. Despite the fact that the Space Shuttle was and will be used in the future almost exclusively for ICC missions (35 of 41 missions), NASA considers the Space Shuttle Program an independent project from the ISS. For this reason, it does not include the cost of the Space Shuttle Program in their ISS costs.

    International Space Station Costs (NASA) Total: $54 to 59 billion

    1994 2005 - $26 billion
    2006 2007 - $4 billion
    2008 2016 - $24 to 29 billion (projected)

    Space Shuttle Program: $38 billion

    Total estimated costs:

    U.S.: $100 billion
    Europe: $14 billion
    Japan: $10 billion
    Russia: Unknown
    Canada: $2 billion
    part of the problem with nailing down figures is that only the EU has released any cost and puts the total cost at about 100 billion Euro's
    "Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offense, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the Majesty of Heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings..." Patrick Henry
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