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  1. #1 Most intelligent dog breeds 
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    Smart dogs

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    10 Smart Dog Breeds
    If you’re looking for a smart, healthy dog, this list of 10 breeds that are considered intelligent dogs might help:
    • Border collies. They have been bred as sheep herders and have a lot of energy. They need plenty of exercise and open space to run.
    • Doberman pinschers. These guard dogs are obedient and will watch over you, but they need regular exercise.
    • Australian cattle dogs. They’ve been bred to herd cattle and are very smart. But they need lots of exercise and something to do, such as agility training.
    • German shepherds. They’re loving guard dogs that like children, but they need regular physical activity.
    • Golden retrievers. They’re used as hunting dogs and help with search and rescue missions. They’re also friendly and love to please their owners, although they need plenty of exercise.
    • Labrador retrievers. These hunting dogs work big jobs. They’re used as guide dogs for the blind, narcotic detection dogs with police departments, and in search and rescue teams. They’re highly trainable and have good tempers.
    • Rottweilers. These obedient dogs work as herders, therapy dogs, and police dogs. They’re loving to their owners but tend to protect their homes and can be difficult with strangers. Experts recommend socializing these dogs and getting obedience training. Rottweilers also need to exercise every day.
    • Poodles. They’re beautiful, smart, and active. Poodles do well in any size home, but need to be active every day.
    • Shetland sheepdogs. Also called shelties, these herding dogs are very compliant and devoted to their owners. They can be shy with strangers and may try to herd people. They do best on a farm, but can also do well in homes if they get enough exercise.
    • Papillons. These small dogs do well in any size home and they’re considered happy and alert.
    But having a healthy pet is about more than the dog’s intelligence. If you want a happy, healthy dog, it’s best to choose one with the right energy level for your lifestyle, Beaver says. “If you come home from work and stay in your apartment, you need a dog without a lot of energy,” she says. If you live on a farm, on the other hand, a high-energy dog will have plenty of activities to keep it busy.
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  2. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaintLouieWoman View Post
    it’s best to choose one with the right energy level for your lifestyle, Beaver says.
    My Rottie was happy to sit on the couch and cuddle, or happy to walk for hours. She would play fetch the tennis ball for about ten rounds, and then eat the tennis ball.

    She was the best dog I have ever had, amazing when you consider she had been a neglected guard dog, left alone in a warehouse for days at a time. She never got over the obsession with food, but she obeyed the rule about not stealing it from your hand or the table. The kitchen counter was fair game if you left her alone, though. She was great and gentle with small dogs and children, but held her own in the big dog park.

    I would love to adopt another Rottie, but can't imagine finding another as sweet and fiercely loyal.
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    Senior Member newshutr's Avatar
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    This is our baby... Zee, an Australian Cattle Dog.. A Shelter dog. All they'd tell us is that she had "owner problems.."

    Smart as a whip. And makes sure before she goes up with us to bed, that our two boys are in their rooms by checking the rooms out.

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    We loved Nicholson, our Shih Tzu, but smart, he wasn't. Lovable, sensitive, even brave up to a point.

    Actually, he was smart for a Shih Tzu, but Shih Tzu's nearly always end near the bottom of the IQ totem pole.
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    My dog is a mix of two on that list. Dumbest I've ever owned.
    In most sports, cold-cocking an opposing player repeatedly in the face with a series of gigantic Slovakian uppercuts would get you a multi-game suspension without pay.

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    The dumbest, stupidest dog has to be the Afghan Hound. Not a brain in their entire bodies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipsycatlover View Post
    The dumbest, stupidest dog has to be the Afghan Hound. Not a brain in their entire bodies.
    But they're pretty. :D

    Irish setters aren't known for their brains, either.

    Had Norwegian elkhounds and they were smart, but stubborn. The schnauzers I had a long time ago were also clever little dogs, but also stubborn. The greyhounds are very gentle, loving dogs, that seem to be very attuned to their owners. They have to be smart to run their own races, figuring out angles in the race with no mini jockeys guiding them. :p
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaintLouieWoman View Post
    .........Irish setters aren't known for their brains, either.........
    THAT'S NOT TRUE! My ancestors came from Ireland and they were plenty smart!...............OH. Setters. I thought she said settlers.:o
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    Senior Member Constitutionally Speaking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TruckerMe View Post
    We loved Nicholson, our Shih Tzu, but smart, he wasn't. Lovable, sensitive, even brave up to a point.

    Actually, he was smart for a Shih Tzu, but Shih Tzu's nearly always end near the bottom of the IQ totem pole.

    I had one who stole my heart but no one would confuse him with a smart animal. My Labs have always been pretty smart, but the smartest dog I have ever owned was a Belgian Shepherd.
    I long for the days when our President actually liked our country.
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    I have a poodle who is highly intelligent. More intelligent than most children I've run into. She is a little girl in a fur coat.
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