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  1. #1 Warning---beware of chicken jerky 
    Administrator SaintLouieWoman's Avatar
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    In case you havenít see this Ö.

    [This may be forwarded to other lists. If you do, please mention you saw it on VETMED. - SP]

    <http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/.../ucm280586.htm>

    FDA Continues to Caution Dog Owners About Chicken Jerky Products

    November 18, 2011

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is again cautioning consumers that chicken jerky products for dogs (also sold as chicken tenders, strips or
    treats) may be associated with illness in dogs. In the last 12 months, FDA has seen an increase in the number of complaints it received of dog illnesses associated with consumption of chicken jerky products imported from China.
    These complaints have been reported to FDA by dog owners and veterinarians.

    FDA issued a cautionary warning regarding chicken jerky products to consumers in September 2007 and a Preliminary Animal Health Notification in December of 2008. After seeing the number of complaints received drop off during the latter part of 2009 and most of 2010, the FDA is once again seeing the number of complaints rise to the levels of concern that prompted release of our earlier warnings.

    Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be fed occasionally in small quantities.

    FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs that may occur within hours to days of feeding the products: decreased appetite; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours.
    Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose).
    Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

    FDA, in addition to several animal health diagnostic laboratories in the U.S., is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. FDAís Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (VLRN) is now available to support these animal health diagnostic laboratories. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA continues extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified a contaminant.

    The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem and its origin. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their state or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints1.
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  2. #2  
    Grouchy Old Broad Kay's Avatar
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    Good to know. It's strange, but one of my dogs won't eat chicken.
    She turns her nose up at any type of chicken based dog food or treat.
    The other dog will eat anything no matter what or how long its been dead.
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  3. #3  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Some people were feeding small breeds the jerky large amounts. Not good. It could also be a chocking hazard, most labels say to soak in water first if you wish.

    In China they claim they only use dark meat for cooking so the white meat is used for the treats.....we also get a lot of human food from China.

    I know one store that had about the only private brand that was never recalled, and even that is now being switched out to a new brand. When the stuff is on sale it's not uncommon to see people buy ten bags of it. I don't know if people are just too lazy to feed their dogs and load them up on the treats or what they were doing. Other stores were taking advantage of the shortage and were really jacking up the price on much smaller bags.

    The FDA is still looking for answers.
    A lot of the cases were not getting reported and the FDA would of paid for the testing:


    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to caution consumers about a potential association between the development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products. The productsóalso called chicken tenders, strips, or treatsóare imported from China. FDA continues to receive complaints of sick dogs that their owners or veterinarians associate with eating chicken jerky products. FDA issued a cautionary warning to consumers in September 2007.

    Australian news organizations report that the University of Sydney is also investigating an association between illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky in Australia. At least one firm in Australia has recalled their chicken jerky product and the recall notification stated the product was manufactured in China.

    What is FDA Doing?
    FDA, in addition to several veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the United States, is working to find out why these products are associated with illness in dogs. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a precise cause for the reported illnesses.
    FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.
    FDA continues to actively investigate the problem. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky.
    Tips for Consumers
    Do not substitute chicken jerky products for a balanced diet. The products are intended to be used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products.
    If you choose to feed your dog chicken jerky products, watch the dog closely. Stop feeding the product if your dog shows any of the following signs, which may occur within hours to days after feeding the product:
    - decreased appetite, although some dogs may continue to eat the treats instead of other foods
    - decreased activity
    - vomiting
    - diarrhea, sometimes with blood
    - increased water drinking or increased urination


    http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/Cons.../ucm092802.htm
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  4. #4  
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    It's simple, don't buy any dog treats or food that comes from China. There are plenty of home made treats that are easy to make for dogs.

    We bought a dehydrator a couple of years ago just to make jerky and other dried treats, like yams and fruits for our dog.
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  5. #5  
    Sin City Moderator RobJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thundley4 View Post
    It's simple, don't buy any dog treats or food that comes from China. There are plenty of home made treats that are easy to make for dogs.

    We bought a dehydrator a couple of years ago just to make jerky and other dried treats, like yams and fruits for our dog.
    Good idea.

    Almost all of the treat and food manufactures are starting to use Made in the USA on their labels, but that still does not mean the ingredients are US sourced.

    I just read DU and blow second hand smoke in my dogs face while feeding him Cheetos.
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