Thread: Best Books Ever

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  1. #31  
    Senior Member Jumpy's Avatar
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    I listen to audio books while I work. From the Library, or I pick them up at yardsales, or a bargain basement place. I have listened to most of the Stephen King DarkTower series and LOVED some of them. I wasn't wild about the ending.

    Books I will read, or listen to more than once are the Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisters. I absolutely loved it. So shoot me.

    I loved Ruth Rendell's, "Crocodile Bird". Listened 3 times and will listen again. It might not be as good of a read as it is a listen. The reader is amazing.

    Garden of Beasts, by Jeffrey Deaver was very good, and I will listen again.

    Dean Koontz- The Watchers. Delightful read, and listen.

    To Kill a Mockingbird-Harper

    Carrie - Stephen King

    I keep trying to listen to the Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy, but mostly I fall asleep to it.

    Oh.. one more. I actually had time to read this one. I loved it.. very easy read and couldn't put it down until the end. "The five people you meet in Heaven".

    P.S.S Another must read. Jeannette Walls - Glass Castles.

    P.S.S.S The boy named IT.

    What is all the fuss about "Catcher in the Rye"??? I recently finished that for the first time.
    Last edited by Jumpy; 06-11-2008 at 08:06 PM.
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  2. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jumpy View Post
    What is all the fuss about "Catcher in the Rye"??? I recently finished that for the first time.
    When it was published (and for way too many decades thereafter) it was considered a groundbreaking insight into adolescent angst. The futility what-his-name feels in engaging the "adult" world is supposed to make us question the hypocrisy and uselessness of most adult interaction.

    In reality, it just showed us the typical adolescent experience of an upper class, white liberal of the type who would later write wrenching Letters-to-the-Editor of the NYT about the evils of Wal-Mart while avidly investing in the commodities market. :)
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  3. #33  
    Senior Member Jumpy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap1 View Post
    When it was published (and for way too many decades thereafter) it was considered a groundbreaking insight into adolescent angst. The futility what-his-name feels in engaging the "adult" world is supposed to make us question the hypocrisy and uselessness of most adult interaction.

    In reality, it just showed us the typical adolescent experience of an upper class, white liberal of the type who would later write wrenching Letters-to-the-Editor of the NYT about the evils of Wal-Mart while avidly investing in the commodities market. :)
    It was good.. but dang, that kid had a potty mouth. Not a book I would recommend to my mother. I really liked parts of it, and might listen again, because it is in the top 10 or 20 of the greatest books ever, on most lists.
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  4. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jumpy View Post
    It was good.. but dang, that kid had a potty mouth. Not a book I would recommend to my mother. I really liked parts of it, and might listen again, because it is in the top 10 or 20 of the greatest books ever, on most lists.
    The mild (by our experience) vulgarity is what shot it to the top of the bestseller lists and made it a high school staple.

    I would not personally consider it important enough to make a top 10 list of American literature. A much better take on adolescent male coming-of-age can be found in 'A Separate Peace' from roughly the same era.
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  5. #35  
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    FeebMaster - I agree, I hope he does a good job (Brian Sanderson) as well. It looks promising though.

    For you Dean Koontz fans, how many of you loved Velocity and The Takers? I think I got that last title right.

    I'm thinking of checking out the Odd Thomas books. Any thoughts?
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  6. #36  
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    "Catcher in the Rye" AND "A Separate Peace" were both required, and very popular, reading during my prep school days (1968-1972).
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  7. #37  
    Resident Unliked Meanie Shannon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan S. View Post
    FeebMaster - I agree, I hope he does a good job (Brian Sanderson) as well. It looks promising though.

    For you Dean Koontz fans, how many of you loved Velocity and The Takers? I think I got that last title right.

    I'm thinking of checking out the Odd Thomas books. Any thoughts?
    You didn't get that last title right.;)
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  8. #38  
    Senior Member Junebug68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan S. View Post
    FeebMaster - I agree, I hope he does a good job (Brian Sanderson) as well. It looks promising though.

    For you Dean Koontz fans, how many of you loved Velocity and The Takers? I think I got that last title right.

    I'm thinking of checking out the Odd Thomas books. Any thoughts?
    I really liked the Odd Thomas books - there's a new one out now too. Kinda dreamy but fun.
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  9. #39  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junebug68 View Post
    I really liked the Odd Thomas books - there's a new one out now too. Kinda dreamy but fun.
    I just finished it a couple of weeks ago. None of them are as good as the first one but I still enjoy the series. There will definitely be another one.
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  10. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    "Catcher in the Rye" AND "A Separate Peace" were both required, and very popular, reading during my prep school days (1968-1972).
    I had to discover "A Separate Peace" on my own and I'm glad I did. :)
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