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  1. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay View Post
    What about the other 4 convicted murderers?
    I dunno. Look them up. Maybe they should stay in prison.

    We know what we've been told; what do you THINK?
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  2. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starbuck View Post
    We know what we've been told; what do you THINK?
    I think that if we let everyone (except the crazies) out of prison all at once, the same people would be back in there within a year or so.

    Now we might lose some innocent people to this experiment, but think about all the loud mouthes it will shut the fuck up. No more can the Innocence Project scam the youth and other useful idiots of this nation into thinking that a significant percentage of the men in prison are there due to institutional racism of the past, or selective enforcement, or whatever excuse they have for the fact that the demographics of prisons don't match those of the nation. I think these people watch too much Law And Order.
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  3. #13  
    Grouchy Old Broad Kay's Avatar
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    I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.
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  4. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay View Post
    I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.
    QFT
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

    Liberalism Is The Philosophy Of The Stupid

    To Achieve Ordered Liberty You Must Have Moral Order As Well

    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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  5. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starbuck View Post
    Lanie ought to read a little about exactly who got pardoned. Barbour won't discuss it.

    Some of the pardoned have already died, many are out of prison, some have already served long sentences. But it makes better headlines to say, "SOME HAVE EVEN BEEN CONVICTED OF MURDER!"
    I have no doubt that she read the whole thing.

    She was perfoming her due dilligence as a Libtard to try for a "gotcha" moment.

    And as usual...Bridget failed miserably.
    In Memory Of My Friend 1st Sgt. Tim Millsap A Co, 70th Eng. Bn. 3rd Bde 1st AD...K.I.A. 25 April 2005

    Liberalism Is The Philosophy Of The Stupid

    To Achieve Ordered Liberty You Must Have Moral Order As Well

    The libs/dems of today are the Quislings of former years. The cowards who would vote a fraud into office in exchange for handouts from the devil.
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  6. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starbuck View Post
    You have to peruse the names yourself; the press just figures you're going to read the headlines and fall in step. Here's one:
    1) Kirby Tate got 60 years in 2003 for selling marijuana to an undercover wire-wearer as a habitual offender, two prior offenses, both related to sale of marijuana less than an ounce. He was holding about 36 lbs. Here's a link to the proceedings: http://courts.ms.gov/Images/Opinions/CO24636.pdf

    2) Booker T Barnes....who died in 2009

    Here's another interesting case:
    3) WHEREAS, Harry Russ Bostick was placed in the Drug Court Program beginning on or about March 4, 2011. His estimated release date from the Drug Court Program, assuming no sanctions, is March 4, 2013….
    BUT
    Trooper Ray Hall of the Mississippi Highway Patrol says Charity Smith, 18, of Okolona, died as a result of her injuries.

    Smith was driving a Buick LeSabre and apparently tried to pull from a private drive onto Highway 278 when she pulled into the path of a 2010 Ford F-150, driven by Harry Bostick, 55, of Oxford. …


    It was Bosticks third DUI, but look at the facts.....Someone pulled out in front of him.

    And on it goes, but you'll have to do your own random search of the names, which are available many places. And when you do search you'll probably find the same information I saw.
    OK. Thanks.

    I can certainly appreciate the concerns over the one that started all of this off, David Gatlin. For those who haven't been following closely, he's the one who shot his wife in the head while she was holding their baby. The family of his victims are, I would say, understandably upset.

    One of the articles that I read on this said that there's some sort of tradition of letting well-behaved inmates not only work as a trustee (they keep calling them "trusty," but I must assume that they mean trustee) at the governor's mansion, but also to live at the governor's mansion as well. Now, Mississippi can certainly do as she pleases as a sovereign state, but I have to question the wisdom of such a policy. I shoot my wife in the head as she's holding our infant, and my "punishment" is to live at the governor's mansion? Sheesh. If these were minor offenders, I could possibly see using this program as a carrot to induce good behavior, but hardened murderers? None too swuft, if you ask me. Especially since part of this tradition is to pardon these people when the governor leaves office. That just boggles the mind.

    Like I said, Mississippi is free to do as she chooses, but damn....
    Olde-style, states' rights conservative. Ask if this concept confuses you.
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  7. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Wood View Post
    .........
    I have to say that the scenario of the guilty victim has always interested me in that the mothers of MADD and others who make their living off DUI seem to completely ignore the role of the deceased as long as they have a live drunk to blame. Fortunately, here in FLorida they do test the corpse be it a pedestrian who stepped in front of the car on Gulf Blvd, or the "(compelling description of a young man or woman)" who raced across six lanes of US 19 without regard for oncoming traffic, and landed some poor schmuck in jail because his BAC was .087 which would have been perfectly legal until 1995.

    Sorry, but if two drunks collide I don't see how we justify only blaming one of them, unless we're going to apply the same criteria we would if both had been sober. I don't approve of course, but I have known a number of habitual alcoholics (not face down on the bar drunkards) who have safer driving habits than many sober but careless people.
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  8. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Wood View Post
    OK. Thanks.

    I can certainly appreciate the concerns over the one that started all of this off, David Gatlin. For those who haven't been following closely, he's the one who shot his wife in the head while she was holding their baby. The family of his victims are, I would say, understandably upset.

    One of the articles that I read on this said that there's some sort of tradition of letting well-behaved inmates not only work as a trustee (they keep calling them "trusty," but I must assume that they mean trustee) at the governor's mansion, but also to live at the governor's mansion as well. Now, Mississippi can certainly do as she pleases as a sovereign state, but I have to question the wisdom of such a policy. I shoot my wife in the head as she's holding our infant, and my "punishment" is to live at the governor's mansion? Sheesh. If these were minor offenders, I could possibly see using this program as a carrot to induce good behavior, but hardened murderers? None too swuft, if you ask me. Especially since part of this tradition is to pardon these people when the governor leaves office. That just boggles the mind.

    Like I said, Mississippi is free to do as she chooses, but damn....
    Now you're talking from an informed position. Some of these pardons leave me a little puzzled. I would be happier if Barbour would discuss them, but evidently that's not gonna happen.

    It's too late now, though. Everyone in America is now aware that Mississippi has released Murders and Rapists into the world. And the chances of the average dude doing a little homework is about zero.

    PS...I looked up the word 'trusty'. The press got it right. A trustee is something entirely different.
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  9. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay View Post
    I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.
    Now, Kay.

    That's why there are degrees of murder and juries and guidelines and appeals. The sentencing procedure is never as simple as you have now chosen to believe. That's the way they do things in China, not the U.S. But you're right. Execution upon conviction would simplify the pardon decisions.

    The tradition of pardoning is a good tool, and I think it should remain in place. There are some pardons on the list that are hard to understand. Adam Wood found one and there are several others. Clinton got a lot of heat over his pardons, and Barbour will have to take the heat from his.
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  10. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Wood View Post
    (they keep calling them "trusty," but I must assume that they mean trustee)
    No, you mustn't assume that. Here's an explanation.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusty_system_(prison)
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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