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  1. #21  
    Senior Member namvet's Avatar
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    Judge says no way Jose

    As victims' loved ones ask why killers and rapists got pardoned by former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during his final hours in office, a Mississippi state judge has temporarily halted the release of 21 of the 200-plus pardoned inmates.

    Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood had requested the injunction against the inmates' releases, telling reporters he believes some of Barbour's pardons could have violated the state constitution by failing to give sufficient public notice that the convicts were seeking clemency.
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    Liberals: Obama's useful Idiots
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  2. #22  
    I'm hyper. Lanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    We do.If you think he was blackmailed then why the prefatory statement implying Republicans are soft on crime?
    I wanted to be a smarty pants.

    I will be happy when this governor is gone.
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  3. #23  
    I'm hyper. Lanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starbuck View Post
    Lanie ought to read a little about exactly who got pardoned. Barbour won't discuss it.

    Some of the pardoned have already died, many are out of prison, some have already served long sentences. But it makes better headlines to say, "SOME HAVE EVEN BEEN CONVICTED OF MURDER!"
    Usually if one is out of prison, they don't have certain rights. For instance, somebody convicted of murder might not have the right to own a gun or to vote. Pardoning these people allows them to be able to do this.

    Now, there's a reason some of these people got long sentences. It's because they were considered to be a danger to society.
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  4. #24  
    I'm hyper. Lanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay View Post
    I think those convicted of murder should have been executed within 6 months of their conviction. Then we wouldn't even be having this lame discussion on whether they should have been pardoned or not in the first place.
    While I'm actually against the death penalty, you're right.

    What I'd like to see is to take away the ability to pardon from politicians. These people were convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced by a judge in good standing. There is an appeals process to try to get innocent people out. There are parole boards to evaluate whether one is rehabilitated enough to enter the streets early. We don't need to give unconditional rights to pardon to politicians.
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  5. #25  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    I wanted to be a smarty pants.

    I will be happy when this governor is gone.
    He's already gone, Sweetie. He left last week.
    Try to keep up, now.:)
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  6. #26  
    Grouchy Old Broad Kay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starbuck View Post
    Now, Kay.

    That's why there are degrees of murder and juries and guidelines and appeals
    About those degrees of murder etc you mention,
    I've never been burdened with the shades of grey syndrome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    While I'm actually against the death penalty, you're right.

    What I'd like to see is to take away the ability to pardon from politicians. These people were convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced by a judge in good standing. There is an appeals process to try to get innocent people out. There are parole boards to evaluate whether one is rehabilitated enough to enter the streets early. We don't need to give unconditional rights to pardon to politicians.
    I tend to agree mostly. I don't mind a governor or president having the pardon power. But maybe there should be some type of mechanism in place where a pardon could be contested within 10 days or veto'd by their Supream Court, just as a check and balance. Better to keep 10 truly rehabilitated convicts in the pokey than let just 1 free to kill again I say.
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  7. #27  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    While I'm actually against the death penalty, you're right.

    What I'd like to see is to take away the ability to pardon from politicians. These people were convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced by a judge in good standing. There is an appeals process to try to get innocent people out. There are parole boards to evaluate whether one is rehabilitated enough to enter the streets early. We don't need to give unconditional rights to pardon to politicians.
    This coming from someone who spent years bitching about "the Texacutioner," who actually didn't have that power.

    Hmph.
    Olde-style, states' rights conservative. Ask if this concept confuses you.
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  8. #28  
    I'm hyper. Lanie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Wood View Post
    This coming from someone who spent years bitching about "the Texacutioner," who actually didn't have that power.

    Hmph.
    Hush! lol.

    I could go into other aspects about Bush and that time period, but you are right. I honestly think that's more Texan culture than anything else. Not that NC culture would have room to talk lately.

    I guess seeing Barbour do that just blew my mind. Seriously.

    He gave his explanation. He says that they've repented and should be pardoned. He brought up that he trusts them near his grand-children. I can see his point, but isn't it possible that they knew he had the power to free them? I still say that should be left to the parole boards.
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  9. #29  
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    OK here's the breakdown:

    189 were already freed from prison.

    13 were chronically ill and had had their sentences suspended. They remain under supervision and can be re-jailed if they get out of line.

    3 got conditional clemency, which means they, too, are supervised and better not screw up again or else they go straight to jail.

    5 were mansion trusties. They had worked their way up the prison system through consistent good behavior and lived in a situation where if they wanted to just walk off they could.

    I don't expect a single one of the people who called for Barbour's head to take their words back. The point is, that we were all instructed by the press to become outraged and most of us obligingly did so. The "outrage" light came on, and we responded.

    http://nems360.com/view/full_story/1...es_left_column
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