Thread: Pot Roast

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  1. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    You of all people should get a good slow cooker. I have three of them!
    I finally got one about 4 years ago. Used it twice and then broke the lid on it. The first time I put it on high and left...burned the crap out of whatever I was making. The second time I used it just to keep some meatballs warm, not for cooking. I'm a bit iffy about turning a cooking fixture on and leaving the house. I'm not certain what my homeowner's deductible is.
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  2. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillygirl View Post
    I finally got one about 4 years ago. Used it twice and then broke the lid on it. The first time I put it on high and left...burned the crap out of whatever I was making. The second time I used it just to keep some meatballs warm, not for cooking. I'm a bit iffy about turning a cooking fixture on and leaving the house. I'm not certain what my homeowner's deductible is.
    I can't imagine what happened to make it break the lid. Normally, you wouldn't put a crockpot on high and leave the house for more than an hour or so but the food inside would just slowly carbonize, it wouldn't explode or catch on fire.

    Try buying one with at least 4 settings. If you put everything in the pot the night before (except the potatoes), it's very easy to dump a few spuds in there in the morning and set it on low all day long. I use mine often enough in the fall and winter to leave it out on the counter all the time and I hate stuff cluttering up the counter. There are a couple of the good low carb cookbooks for crockpots now, too. :)
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  3. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillygirl View Post
    I finally got one about 4 years ago. Used it twice and then broke the lid on it. The first time I put it on high and left...burned the crap out of whatever I was making. The second time I used it just to keep some meatballs warm, not for cooking. I'm a bit iffy about turning a cooking fixture on and leaving the house. I'm not certain what my homeowner's deductible is.
    Those things are just about failsafe.They draw so little current on low heat the only dangerous thing that you could do is to put one on top of a bunch of papers when you leave for the day .

    As for burning foods just keep enough fluids in the cooker and it will be fine.We use it for beef stew and stewed chicken and have never had a problem with it .

    It would be great for someone like you who work and are out of the house all day long.Just learn to plan ahead for the meals and adjust the cooking times .

    Some of the high end crockpots have built in timers to start and stop at a certain time.Even if you are late coming home the pot and the food will be warm.
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  4. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    It would be great for someone like you who work and are out of the house all day long.Just learn to plan ahead for the meals...
    We may have found the weak link here...
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  5. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I can't imagine what happened to make it break the lid.
    I dropped it on my garage floor.

    Normally, you wouldn't put a crockpot on high and leave the house for more than an hour or so but the food inside would just slowly carbonize, it wouldn't explode or catch on fire.
    Yeah...I thought I put it on low. And my brother innocently asked me when I got home whether I meant to have it boiling away like that...but it smelled good ()
    Try buying one with at least 4 settings. If you put everything in the pot the night before (except the potatoes), it's very easy to dump a few spuds in there in the morning and set it on low all day long. I use mine often enough in the fall and winter to leave it out on the counter all the time and I hate stuff cluttering up the counter. There are a couple of the good low carb cookbooks for crockpots now, too. :)
    I see lots of good recipes for crockpots and really do think it sounds like a great idea. I will purchase one with multiple settings. I'm still afraid to leave the house with it on though.
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  6. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by megimoo View Post
    Those things are just about failsafe.They draw so little current on low heat the only dangerous thing that you could do is to put one on top of a bunch of papers when you leave for the day .

    As for burning foods just keep enough fluids in the cooker and it will be fine.We use it for beef stew and stewed chicken and have never had a problem with it .

    It would be great for someone like you who work and are out of the house all day long.Just learn to plan ahead for the meals and adjust the cooking times .

    Some of the high end crockpots have built in timers to start and stop at a certain time.Even if you are late coming home the pot and the food will be warm.
    So I hear. And Linda numbers is right. The planning aspect of it is not my strong suit.
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  7. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillygirl View Post
    And Linda numbers is right. The planning aspect of it is not my strong suit.
    It wasn't really a shot at you; I didn't do that sort of thing much when I was "cooking for one", either.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  8. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    It wasn't really a shot at you; I didn't do that sort of thing much when I was "cooking for one", either.
    I know what you mean. When my brother and his kids were living with me for awhile, I thought I would use it more frequently. They liked Chinese food and chicken fingers, though. In 18 months I think I cooked them 2 real meals. :p
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  9. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    I'm sure it was good, but the sodium in that version would kill me on the spot. I brown my pot roast with a bit of salt, pepper, and a little cinnamon, then put it in the crockpot on a bed of sliced onions, and add red wine.
    I have a similar method but have never used cinnamon. I sear the roast in oil, onions and seasonings. My grandmother always added ketchup with the liquid and so do I. My family loves my pot roast.
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  10. #20  
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    The cinnamon just adds a little sweetness; it's not identifiable as a flavor. It mixes with the wine very well.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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