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  1. #1 Obama Forced His Students to Read Bell at University of Chicago Law School 
    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Obama Forced His Students to Read Bell at University of Chicago Law School











    by Charles C. Johnson 1 hour ago 4post a comment
    Barack Obama made his own students at the University of Chicago Law School read some of Derrick Bell's most radical and racially inflammatory writings.

    In 1994, Barack Obama taught a course at the University of Chicago Law School entitled, "Current Issues in Racism and the Law." The reading list and syllabus for that class were made available by the New York Times in 2008, though there seems to have been little analysis of its content by Jodi Kantor, the Times’s Obama correspondent.

    Obama routinely assigned works by Bell as required reading, including Bell's racialist interpretations of seminal civil rights laws and cases. No other scholar’s work appears as often in the syllabus as Bell’s does.

    Obama relied particularly heavily upon Bell’s major work, Race, Racism, and American Law (1973). Now in its sixth edition, the book lays out Bell’s Critical Race Theory, which is based on the Alinskyite presumption that all of law is a construct--not of justice, but of power exercised by whites against blacks.

    (Obama appears to be diagramming just such a presumption in a famous photo from his campaign that ran in The Times and accompanied a piece written by Kantor on Obama’s stint as a law lecturer. The title of the diagram, “relationships built on self-interest,” links corporations, banks, and utilities, as part of a "power analysis.")

    Perhaps most interesting was Obama's decision to include and to require the introduction to Bell’s controversial 1992 book, Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism, which relied on manufactured stories (or, as Bell called them, “allegories” or “fables”) meant to portray the allegedly structural racism of American society.

    In a September 24, 1992 interview with C-Span’s Brian Lamb, Lamb quoted this paragraph from Bell’s book and asked Bell for comment.

    Black people will never gain full equality in this country. Even those Herculean efforts we hail as successful will produce no more than temporary peaks of progress, short-lived victories that slide into irrelevance as racial patterns adapt in ways that maintain white dominance. This is a hard-to-accept fact that all history verifies. We must acknowledge it, not as a sign of submission, but as an act of ultimate defiance. (p. 12, italics in original)
    “That, if I had to put down my whole thirty five years working in this [field] is [my view] reflected… If you read nothing else, I think that reflects my experience,” Bell told Lamb.
    That is what Obama wanted his fellow students at Harvard, and the students he taught at Chicago, to understand--and believe.Contrary to media spin, Obama did not encounter radical racialist professor Derrick Bell in a youthful flirtation with radicalism. Obama befriended Bell as an adult, and he used Bell's work to indoctrinate his own students about race and the law.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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    Power CUer noonwitch's Avatar
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    Part of higher education is reading diverse theories and being able to either critique them or support them with your written arguments. That definitely applies to law school.

    I had to read works by Lauffer in my econ classes, and theories in religion class that I didn't necessarily agree with when I was in college.
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    LTC Member Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    Part of higher education is reading diverse theories and being able to either critique them or support them with your written arguments. That definitely applies to law school.

    I had to read works by Lauffer in my econ classes, and theories in religion class that I didn't necessarily agree with when I was in college.
    Yes, but you were a student, not a teacher. Obama used Bell's books as classroom texts, and far more often than any other source, presumably because he considered them valuable. The questions that should have been asked was whether Obama thought that Bell's theories on racial politics are accurate at the time, how Bell's theories influence his policy decisions, and whether he still sees them as accurate. The media didn't just fail to do its job, it prevented the job from being done by anyone else, by hiding facts.
    --Odysseus
    Sic Hacer Pace, Para Bellum.

    Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the people!
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    Power CUer NJCardFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    Part of higher education is reading diverse theories and being able to either critique them or support them with your written arguments. That definitely applies to law school.

    I had to read works by Lauffer in my econ classes, and theories in religion class that I didn't necessarily agree with when I was in college.
    OK, if this is true, how often do professors have students read books written by conservative authors? Um, none probably? Funny how liberals always look to excuse their bad practices.
    The Obama Administration: Deny. Deflect. Blame.
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonwitch View Post
    Part of higher education is reading diverse theories and being able to either critique them or support them with your written arguments. That definitely applies to law school.

    I had to read works by Lauffer in my econ classes, and theories in religion class that I didn't necessarily agree with when I was in college.
    I never had to read Mein Kampf as a text book to study Hitler. Your excuse for O Blah Blah is admirable from its loyalty aspect. It fails as an excuse for the Marxist miserably.
    Education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil.
    C. S. Lewis
    Do not ever say that the desire to "do good" by force is a good motive. Neither power-lust nor stupidity are good motives. (Are you listening Barry)?:mad:
    Ayn Rand
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmPat View Post
    I never had to read Mein Kampf as a text book to study Hitler.
    Wow. I sure did.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  7. #7  
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Wow. I sure did.
    The grammar Nazi meme is making more sense now!
    The difference between pigs and people is that when they tell you you're cured it isn't a good thing.
    http://i.imgur.com/FHvkMSE.jpg
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by linda22003 View Post
    Wow. I sure did.
    I see. I suppose you were forced to read it by a NAZI sympathizer too?

    I tried to read that book on my own, twice! It was impossible to read so I put it down. O Blah Blah forcing his students to read his propaganda was not in the interest of "education" so much as "re-education."
    Education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil.
    C. S. Lewis
    Do not ever say that the desire to "do good" by force is a good motive. Neither power-lust nor stupidity are good motives. (Are you listening Barry)?:mad:
    Ayn Rand
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  9. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockntractor View Post
    The grammar Nazi meme is making more sense now!
    Why do people think it's bad to read different points of view? I'll never understand that.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmPat View Post
    I see. I suppose you were forced to read it by a NAZI sympathizer too?

    I tried to read that book on my own, twice! It was impossible to read so I put it down. O Blah Blah forcing his students to read his propaganda was not in the interest of "education" so much as "re-education."
    No; he was German but of American birth. And yes, the book is pretty turgid stuff.
    "Today, [the American voter] chooses his rulers as he buys bootleg whiskey, never knowing precisely what he is getting, only certain that it is not what it pretends to be." - H.L. Mencken
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