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  1. #1 most spectacular picture of Mars ever taken 
    PORCUS MAXIMUS Rockntractor's Avatar
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    'The next best thing to being there': NASA releases the most spectacular picture of Mars ever taken... in all its 360-degree glory

    By Eddie Wrenn

    PUBLISHED: 12:21 EST, 7 July 2012 | UPDATED: 18:05 EST, 7 July 2012

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    We might not be able to get there yet, but as NASA says, 'this is the next best thing'.

    From fresh rover tracks to an impact crater blasted billions of years ago, a newly completed view from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the ruddy terrain where the voyaging robot spent the Martian winter.

    This scene, recorded from the mast-mounted color camera includes the rover's own solar arrays and deck in the foreground, provides a sense of sitting on top of the rover and taking in the view.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...#ixzz1zzrhMrr9


    Excellent photo at link!
    The difference between pigs and people is that when they tell you you're cured it isn't a good thing.
    http://i.imgur.com/FHvkMSE.jpg
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  2. #2  
    Ancient Fire Breather Retread's Avatar
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    That could almost convince us believers that they really did film this in West Texas..





    It's not how old you are, it's how you got here.
    It's been a long road and not all of it was paved.
    Live every day as if it were your last, because one of these days, it will be.
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  3. #3  
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    Great Pictures!

    I think they are trying to ramp up interest in this thing:


    Curiosity, as the article mentions, will land next month - maybe! It is a very tricky landing. The crane device shown does all the parachuting and reverse thrusting to slow the entry. Then when curiosity touches down the crane cuts loose, flies up and away and crashes. Kind of crazy, but that's how it works. They did it like that to spare the sensitive instruments in Curiosity from any sand kicked up by landing rockets.
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